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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 23, 1996
PERTH, Scotland -- For a slab of sandstone, the Stone of Scone sure does get around.Jacob, the Hebrew patriarch, supposedly slept on it, pilgrims hauled it, Celts shipped it, Edward I stole it, Scottish students stole it back, and a line of kings and queens, including reigning monarch Elizabeth II, have been seated above it during coronation ceremonies at London's Westminster Abbey.Now, 700 years after Edward I claimed the stone for the English, the 300-plus pound slab is returning to Scotland.
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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | June 4, 2011
Inside Westminster Abbey, eight 20-foot-tall live trees lined the center aisle during the wedding of Kate Middleton and Prince William. The trees transformed the space, doing what even the most elaborate floral arrangement could not — providing a natural, living sense of permanence and an air of drama. The move was unexpected, unpretentious and bold. A potted tree on your patio or deck can have the same effect. While not every tree is well-suited for a container, there are a surprising number of options, ranging from crape myrtles to hollies.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 1997
LONDON -- White lilies for "Mummy."Boy princes weeping.A brother in grief speaking with rage.These were the scenes yesterday at Westminster Abbey, as the life of Diana, Princess of Wales, was celebrated in a funeral service that blended hymns, history and heartbreak in a national farewell.Britain's grandest church, a place for kings, queens and poets, became, for one hour, Diana's last public stage.This was the closest she would come to a state funeral, a service that covered the broad sweep of her life from her royal wedding to her personal problems to her newfound confidence in the final year of her life.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | May 5, 2011
There is nothing like the death of the world's most-wanted terrorist to blow a royal wedding right off the front page. Will and Kate's helicopter had no more taken off from Buckingham Palace the morning after their wedding than U.S. helicopters were dropping Navy SEALS into Osama bin Laden's compound to kill him. We went from watching happy throngs waving Union Jacks in Trafalgar Square to watching happy throngs waving American flags at Ground...
FEATURES
January 15, 2008
Jan. 15 1559 England's Queen Elizabeth I was crowned in Westminster Abbey. 1929 Civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta.
NEWS
April 26, 2002
Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother: A memorial service for Britain's Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, who died March 30 at age 101, will take place at 6:30 p.m. Sunday at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church, at Charles and Saratoga streets in Baltimore. The service is sponsored by the St. George's Society and the St. Andrew's Society, along with the church. The service will be sung by Old St. Paul's Choir of Men and Boys, and will include hymns, music and readings used at the Queen Mother's service in Westminster Abbey.
NEWS
December 2, 1996
Koji Kobayashi, 89, an industrial visionary who built NEC Corp. of Japan into a leader in the world electronics industry, died Saturday in a hospital in Tokyo.He served as president of NEC from 1964 until 1976 and then as chairman until 1988, overseeing the company's expansion from its initial business of telephone equipment into computers and computer chips.Today, NEC is the largest supplier of personal computers in Japan and is the second largest semiconductor manufacturer in the world, behind Intel Corp.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 17, 1995
LONDON -- They filled Westminster Abbey yesterday to remember George Peabody, a man whose story reveals that fame is often fleeting, but philanthropy can last forever.Tenants in the homes he built for London's poor were there. So were educators from schools he established in America,including the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.The audience of 1,800 was sprinkled with politicians and clergy, ambassadors and businessman, all somehow still touched by Peabody in the 200th anniversary year of his birth.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 3, 1993
LONDON -- St. Margaret's, the white church with the blue sundial on its tower, sits in the shadow of the soaring Westminster Abbey, across the street from the Houses of Parliament, and thus at the vortex of the cyclone of tourism that hits London each year.And this church has much to offer. It was founded in the 12th century. John Milton, Samuel Pepys and Winston Churchill were married here. William Caxton, who brought printing to England, is buried here. And Sir Walter Raleigh.Well, not entirely.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 1997
LONDON -- The British royal family was seeking reconciliation with its subjects.But Charles, the ninth Earl Spencer, had other plans during his funeral tribute yesterday to his sister, Diana, Princess of Wales.He aimed a broadside at the royal family when he said that Diana "needed no royal title to continue to generate her particular brand of magic." Diana was forced to give up the title "Her Royal Highness" after she divorced Prince Charles last year.Spencer also said that as the "blood family" of Diana's sons, Princes William and Harry, he and his two sisters pledged to continue steering the boys "so that their souls are not simply immersed by duty and tradition."
FEATURES
January 15, 2008
Jan. 15 1559 England's Queen Elizabeth I was crowned in Westminster Abbey. 1929 Civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta.
NEWS
April 26, 2002
Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother: A memorial service for Britain's Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, who died March 30 at age 101, will take place at 6:30 p.m. Sunday at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church, at Charles and Saratoga streets in Baltimore. The service is sponsored by the St. George's Society and the St. Andrew's Society, along with the church. The service will be sung by Old St. Paul's Choir of Men and Boys, and will include hymns, music and readings used at the Queen Mother's service in Westminster Abbey.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 1, 2002
LONDON -- It didn't take mourners long yesterday to walk through St. James's Palace to sign condolence books honoring the life of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. The short line seemed a sign of the times and the changed relationship over the decades between Britons and the royal family, the Windsors. The days when the Windsors were at the center of public life seem as long gone as the era that ended with the queen mother's death Saturday at age 101. Even some of the monarchy's biggest backers -- and plenty are left in the land -- seem resigned to the notion that the old times can never be rekindled.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2000
The ghost floating above the television this evening will be familiar enough: the bad hairpiece, the face of a dyspeptic Bela Lugosi and the voice like a guy behind a Brooklyn delicatessen counter reciting Leviticus. It's Howard Cosell, of course, drifting through the living room as "Monday Night Football" begins a new season, the Cosell chair in the play-by-play booth changing occupants once more, ABC-TV calling upon comedian Dennis Miller to jack up ratings for a former prime-time hit. With a few ex-jocks in between, we've gone from Howard the Humble to Dennis the Droll.
NEWS
September 27, 1997
WHEN THIS year's Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards were announced, two of the three winners were from the Johns Hopkins University. In New York City yessterday, Victor McKusick accepted an award for special achievement, while Alfred Sommer was honored for his clinical research.The two scientists join five previous researchers who won the Lasker prize while at Hopkins.Aspiring young scientists can learn much from the careers of these two men.Dr. McKusick began his medical career in cardiology, but became intrigued by genetics.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 1997
LONDON -- White lilies for "Mummy."Boy princes weeping.A brother in grief speaking with rage.These were the scenes yesterday at Westminster Abbey, as the life of Diana, Princess of Wales, was celebrated in a funeral service that blended hymns, history and heartbreak in a national farewell.Britain's grandest church, a place for kings, queens and poets, became, for one hour, Diana's last public stage.This was the closest she would come to a state funeral, a service that covered the broad sweep of her life from her royal wedding to her personal problems to her newfound confidence in the final year of her life.
NEWS
September 27, 1997
WHEN THIS year's Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards were announced, two of the three winners were from the Johns Hopkins University. In New York City yessterday, Victor McKusick accepted an award for special achievement, while Alfred Sommer was honored for his clinical research.The two scientists join five previous researchers who won the Lasker prize while at Hopkins.Aspiring young scientists can learn much from the careers of these two men.Dr. McKusick began his medical career in cardiology, but became intrigued by genetics.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 3, 1997
GREAT BRINGTON, England -- The wind plays in the long grass of St. Mary the Virgin Church. It whips the dying thistles against the headstones.Inside repose the notable kinsmen of Diana, Princess of Wales, 20 generations of prideful knights and their ladies. A place has been prepared there for her.On Saturday, Diana will be interred in the Spencer family chapel, a place separate from the public area of the church. It was added in 1616 by John Spencer, founder of the dynasty.Diana will be placed next to her father, the eighth earl.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 1997
LONDON -- The British royal family was seeking reconciliation with its subjects.But Charles, the ninth Earl Spencer, had other plans during his funeral tribute yesterday to his sister, Diana, Princess of Wales.He aimed a broadside at the royal family when he said that Diana "needed no royal title to continue to generate her particular brand of magic." Diana was forced to give up the title "Her Royal Highness" after she divorced Prince Charles last year.Spencer also said that as the "blood family" of Diana's sons, Princes William and Harry, he and his two sisters pledged to continue steering the boys "so that their souls are not simply immersed by duty and tradition."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 3, 1997
GREAT BRINGTON, England -- The wind plays in the long grass of St. Mary the Virgin Church. It whips the dying thistles against the headstones.Inside repose the notable kinsmen of Diana, Princess of Wales, 20 generations of prideful knights and their ladies. A place has been prepared there for her.On Saturday, Diana will be interred in the Spencer family chapel, a place separate from the public area of the church. It was added in 1616 by John Spencer, founder of the dynasty.Diana will be placed next to her father, the eighth earl.
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