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NEWS
September 30, 1996
A tunnel may seem an implausible spark for mayhem.But it was Israel's decision to open a 2,000-year-old tunnel in Jerusalem's Old City that ignited the violence that has taken at least 68 lives -- 54 Palestinians and 14 Israelis. What mattered was that the tunnel lay at the base of the Temple Mount. Because for Jews and Muslims, the Temple Mount is the holiest ground of a holy city.When prophets spoke of Last Days or of God's final settling of accounts, the presumed setting was the Temple Mount, a natural plateau west of the Mount of Olives.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
With outposts in both Baltimore and Los Angeles and appearances all over the world, Duff Goldman has done his share of traveling. Recently the Ace of Cakes shared some of his favorite destinations and a few travel tips with Johnny Jet . He told the website that he travels four to six times a month, has been to more than 20 countries and five continents. Even so, he counts Baltimore as his favorite city.  Istanbul is his fave international city and Jerusalem's Western Wall his favorite global site.
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2005
Seemingly transported across the ages, more than 600 blocks of limestone from Jerusalem rise in a simple yet breathtaking wall above the sanctuary of the Har Sinai Congregation synagogue in Owings Mills. Over 45 days, they were lifted, one at a time, by two masons on scaffolding using muscle and pulley, then placed and mortared with the deft touch of craftsmen. In commemoration of the fourth anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the synagogue's tribute to Jerusalem's Western Wall will be dedicated tomorrow to the memory of those lost in the attacks and their families -- and to future world peace.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2005
Seemingly transported across the ages, more than 600 blocks of limestone from Jerusalem rise in a simple yet breathtaking wall above the sanctuary of the Har Sinai Congregation synagogue in Owings Mills. Over 45 days, they were lifted, one at a time, by two masons on scaffolding using muscle and pulley, then placed and mortared with the deft touch of craftsmen. In commemoration of the fourth anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the synagogue's tribute to Jerusalem's Western Wall will be dedicated tomorrow to the memory of those lost in the attacks and their families -- and to future world peace.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 27, 1997
JERUSALEM -- After serving 15 1/2 years of a life sentence for a terrorist attack on a Muslim holy shrine, Baltimore-born Alan H. Goodman was released from an Israeli prison last night under an agreement that enabled the convicted killer to return to Maryland, prison officials said.Goodman, 53, was scheduled to leave Israel on a flight bound for the United States and a reunion with his mother, Fannie, in Baltimore.Goodman was convicted on murder and assault with intent to murder charges in an April 11, 1982, shooting in the courtyard of the Al Aqsa mosque on the sacred Temple Mount in Jerusalem, the third-holiest shrine in Islam.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 28, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israeli police clashed yesterday with Muslims at a contested holy site in the Old City here, firing rubber pellets and tossing stun grenades to quell what Israel described as a rock attack on officers. The brief encounter, which Muslim officials said took place after the police officers entered the compound without cause, resulted in minor injuries. It added to the tensions crackling this week, which began with a Palestinian suicide bombing on a Jerusalem bus and also saw violence-marred protests over the barrier that Israel is building in and around the West Bank.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
With outposts in both Baltimore and Los Angeles and appearances all over the world, Duff Goldman has done his share of traveling. Recently the Ace of Cakes shared some of his favorite destinations and a few travel tips with Johnny Jet . He told the website that he travels four to six times a month, has been to more than 20 countries and five continents. Even so, he counts Baltimore as his favorite city.  Istanbul is his fave international city and Jerusalem's Western Wall his favorite global site.
TOPIC
By Aron U. Raskas | July 30, 2000
A recent day in the Old City of Jerusalem. An Arab laborer works at the South Wall archeological site. To his north stand the Jewish Temple Mount, the Al Aqsa mosque and the Dome of the Rock; to his south, hundreds of miles away, the Muslim shrine of Mecca. As the time for Muslim prayer arrives, the Arab laborer unfolds his prayer mat. He turns his back on the two mosques previously before him and prostrates himself in prayer to the south. The picture is striking. As the Camp David postmortems continue, while Arab disinformation campaigns work overtime to generate perceptions of moral and historical equivalence between the Palestinian and Jewish perspectives of Jerusalem, and as the U.S. administration blithely apologizes for the Palestinian negotiating position by suggesting that Jerusalem is "at the core of what it means to be a Palestinian," a candid moment like this is particularly telling.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2005
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - They had jostled along the narrow streets that disappear into the dark warrens of the Dheisheh refugee camp, pressing forward to see Pope John Paul II and desperate for words of encouragement. That was in March 2000. The pope, who died yesterday, promised a new school, and the United Nations promptly built one. In Manger Square, Pope John Paul kissed a bowl of Palestinian soil and said, "Your torment is before the eyes of the world. And it has gone on too long." Pope John Paul, then 79, was already frail and suffering from Parkinson's disease when he embarked on what he described as a "jubilee pilgrimage" to Jordan, Syria, Israel and the West Bank.
NEWS
October 16, 1996
Holding on for telephone serviceTelephone service has taken a giant step backward.Business calls that took minutes a few years ago now take hours, and sometime days, to complete.Most companies have answering machines answer all their calls. Press one for this service, two for that service; it's not unusual to have seven selections.Your selection, of course, is answered by another recording: ''Our customer service representatives are all busy at the moment; please hold.''Don't they realize our time is important?
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2005
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - They had jostled along the narrow streets that disappear into the dark warrens of the Dheisheh refugee camp, pressing forward to see Pope John Paul II and desperate for words of encouragement. That was in March 2000. The pope, who died yesterday, promised a new school, and the United Nations promptly built one. In Manger Square, Pope John Paul kissed a bowl of Palestinian soil and said, "Your torment is before the eyes of the world. And it has gone on too long." Pope John Paul, then 79, was already frail and suffering from Parkinson's disease when he embarked on what he described as a "jubilee pilgrimage" to Jordan, Syria, Israel and the West Bank.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 28, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israeli police clashed yesterday with Muslims at a contested holy site in the Old City here, firing rubber pellets and tossing stun grenades to quell what Israel described as a rock attack on officers. The brief encounter, which Muslim officials said took place after the police officers entered the compound without cause, resulted in minor injuries. It added to the tensions crackling this week, which began with a Palestinian suicide bombing on a Jerusalem bus and also saw violence-marred protests over the barrier that Israel is building in and around the West Bank.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 21, 2003
JERUSALEM - She climbed aboard Bus No. 2 in the Old City without hesitating, her small grandchildren trailing behind, tired after a busy day touring a museum and the ancient ruins in the Jewish Quarter. They sat in the middle, by the swivel point of the articulated bus, and settled in for the short, jerky ride across town. They hardly seemed concerned that the night before on the same line a Palestinian suicide bomber had blown up a nearly identical bus, killing 20 passengers. "That happens all the time," said Judy Berkovitz, smiling down at her 7-year-old granddaughter squirming in the seat beside her, the family exhibiting the stoicism typical of Israelis determined to go about their routines despite attempts by Palestinian militants to create fear and havoc.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 18, 2003
After viewing a children's video of Israel's holy sites, Gabriella Hughes and Sharon Rogers sat elbow to elbow at Columbia's Camp Gan Israel, painting colorful Hebrew lettering carved into wooden signs. The 10-year-olds' rectangular signs spelled mizrach, Hebrew for "east" - a reminder of the Jewish tradition to face east toward Jerusalem during daily prayers. "I will put it on the east side of my room," said Gabriella, as she painted a wooden sun. Sharon will hang her sign, painted teal , in her bedroom, as well.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 30, 2001
JERUSALEM -- Hundreds of Israeli police stormed the city's most fought-over religious shrine yesterday and secured the hilltop compound after rocks rained down on Jewish worshippers bowed in prayer at the Western Wall. It marked the third time that police have gone to the area, sacred to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as Haram al-Sharif, since the outbreak of the Palestinian uprising in September. The uprising began after Ariel Sharon, then the main Israeli opposition leader, visited the Temple Mount, site of the Al Aqsa mosque compound, triggering clashes a week apart that left seven Palestinians dead.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 30, 2000
JERUSALEM - Bloodshed and anger rocked the Holy City and the West Bank yesterday as Israeli police used live ammunition and rubber bullets to quell Palestinian rioting at a plateau sacred to Muslims and Jews and a Palestinian policeman shot and killed an Israeli counterpart on a joint patrol. In all, the past three days of clashes and bombings have killed four Palestinians and two Israelis, injured hundreds, and brought the worst violence in four years to the Temple Mount, or Haram al Sharif, the shrine at the heart of the Arab-Israeli conflict.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 1, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Defying all sorts of doomsday scenarios, this "City of Peace" lived up to its name yesterday. There were no reports of mass suicides by religious cultists, terrorism or rock-throwing mobs, and there were only a few altercations between believers of varied faiths. Instead, the ancient walled town became, for a day, a quiet crossroad of religions and civilizations. The weeks leading up to the year 2000 were filled with official preparations for the direst contingencies. Besides worrying about possible spectacular acts of violence, authorities also were concerned about the mix of crowds of Christians marking the beginning of the third millennium since Jesus' birth, Jews worshiping at the start of the Sabbath and up to half a million Muslims praying at the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa mosques on the final Friday of the holy month of Ramadan.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 30, 2001
JERUSALEM -- Hundreds of Israeli police stormed the city's most fought-over religious shrine yesterday and secured the hilltop compound after rocks rained down on Jewish worshippers bowed in prayer at the Western Wall. It marked the third time that police have gone to the area, sacred to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as Haram al-Sharif, since the outbreak of the Palestinian uprising in September. The uprising began after Ariel Sharon, then the main Israeli opposition leader, visited the Temple Mount, site of the Al Aqsa mosque compound, triggering clashes a week apart that left seven Palestinians dead.
TOPIC
By Aron U. Raskas | July 30, 2000
A recent day in the Old City of Jerusalem. An Arab laborer works at the South Wall archeological site. To his north stand the Jewish Temple Mount, the Al Aqsa mosque and the Dome of the Rock; to his south, hundreds of miles away, the Muslim shrine of Mecca. As the time for Muslim prayer arrives, the Arab laborer unfolds his prayer mat. He turns his back on the two mosques previously before him and prostrates himself in prayer to the south. The picture is striking. As the Camp David postmortems continue, while Arab disinformation campaigns work overtime to generate perceptions of moral and historical equivalence between the Palestinian and Jewish perspectives of Jerusalem, and as the U.S. administration blithely apologizes for the Palestinian negotiating position by suggesting that Jerusalem is "at the core of what it means to be a Palestinian," a candid moment like this is particularly telling.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and By Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 20, 2000
JERUSALEM - Of all the tough issues at Camp David, Jerusalem has proved the most intractable. And when the talks practically collapsed yesterday, the question of sovereignty over the holy city was widely believed to be the cause. The gaps were said to be too wide. Or are they? Given the white-hot passions over the issue among Israelis and Palestinians, neither side could be seen to have given up Jerusalem. It could cost Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak his job. Some say it could cost Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat his life.
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