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FEATURES
September 11, 2007
Sept. 11 2001 In the single worst act of terrorism committed on U.S. soil, nearly 3,000 people died when hijacked jetliners crashed into New York's World Trade Center and the Pentagon and in western Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
June 14, 2014
I would like to personally thank The Sun's editorial board for providing the questionnaire responses of candidates for the primary election. I particularly would like to reference those provided by Tony Campbell, a Republican running for Baltimore County executive. Mr. Campbell has acknowledged growing up in western Pennsylvania and graduating from Blackhawk High School and the University of Pittsburgh. His roots are as a Pennsylvania Democrat. I found his answer regarding the creation of additional council districts to be ambiguous.
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NEWS
By Samantha Bennett | April 22, 2008
PITTSBURGH - Another day, another crowd of suits loitering beside police cars and SUVs in front of the Post-Gazette building. Another candidate is going to grace us with his or her presence and entourage. In the days before the primary, there has been such an invasion of candidates, pundits and press that the population of Western Pennsylvania has doubled. Now I know how Iowans and New Hampshire ... New Hampshirites? New Hampshireans? New Hampshirelles? ... feel when all these yahoos from the big cities parachute in and try to go all native on the locals.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
On this morning 200 years ago, a plucky Irish immigrant, John O'Neill, matched wits with British Adm. Sir George Cockburn, a veteran sea dog in command of a fleet of 19 vessels that sailed into Havre de Grace during the War of 1812. O'Neill was born in Ireland in 1768 and immigrated to America in 1786. After serving under Gen. Henry "Light-Horse Harry" Lee, helping to put an end to the Whiskey Rebellion in western Pennsylvania in 1794, he settled in Havre de Grace, then a small Upper Chesapeake Bay village with about 60 wooden houses.
NEWS
April 2, 1996
THE SELF-STYLED Freemen of Montana, holding off federal law enforcement, are in an American tradition as old as the republic. But so is the authority that must in the end prevail. Most of the Freemen were debtors who came to dispute the legitimacy of the political authority enforcing creditors' rights. So were some Chesapeake tobacco planters in the 1770s who became Patriots in the American Revolution.More relevant forerunners were the farmers of Western Massachusetts who rallied behind Capt.
NEWS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,rick.maese@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
MOON TOWNSHIP, Pa. - With less than two weeks before the election, John McCain is eager for any vote he can get in Pennsylvania, a battleground state that could decide the fate of the Republican's bid for the White House. Even those like Jim Boni, who say that fixing the economy is critical but aren't sure that McCain can do it. Boni retired two years ago from the school district where he taught for 35 years, yet was repeatedly checking his watch as he sipped a cup of coffee yesterday and waited for his shift as a hotel shuttle driver to start.
FEATURES
January 5, 1991
How's the skiing within relatively easy driving distance of Baltimore? Here's a list of popular areas, none more than four hours away. Included is the principal resort number rather than just a taped ski condition report, to enable callers to inquire about lodging, prices and other items.In addition, the Baltimore Sun's SUNDIAL service also offers current conditions at a number of resorts. For information call 783-1800 (in Anne Arundel County call 268-7736), Ext. 5100.* Western Maryland: Wisp, (301)
NEWS
By Sandy Bauers and Sandy Bauers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 16, 2001
SPRINGFIELD, Pa. - Tom Pugel retired early so he could volunteer for a tough job that will take until 2015. And that will just get him to the initial hurdle - witnessing the first of a new generation of American chestnut trees. Unless Pugel, who is 55, lives to a very old age, he will be dead long before the restoration of once-vast forests of chestnut trees, all but wiped out by a blight half a century ago. "I think sometimes," said Pugel, a shy and slender man, "about how long I'm going to live and how far along this project will be."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 27, 1991
FARRELL, Pa. -- When Ann Wilson heard that her daughter's Army Reserve unit in Saudi Arabia might have been hit by an Iraqi Scud missile, she feared the worst."
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | March 31, 2008
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- On Saturday night, Barack Obama went bowling for the first time in 30 years. Part of his new effort to get closer to working-class voters, the presidential candidate grabbed a bite at Altoona's Original Texas Hotdogs, then strapped on a pair of size 13 1/2 shoes at Pleasant Valley lanes, to cheers from patrons. He never loosened his tie and the bowling wasn't pretty - basketball's his game - but from a public-relations standpoint, it was a ten-strike. "Sen. Barack Obama makes a surprise visit to Altoona today," the local CBS TV station announced during the NCAA basketball playoffs.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
John Waters could have been starring in a John Waters movie today when he was picked up hitchhiking in Ohio by members of an indie rock band. It's so weird, it can only be true. The website DCist had the amazing details. The band Here We Go Magic was motoring in a van through eastern Ohio, close to the Pennsylvania border, when they pass a dude on the side of the road holding up a sign. They pick the dude up, who turns out to be Baltimore's own quirky filmmaker Waters. And, like anyone would do, the band immediately Tweets the news: "Just picked up John Waters hitchhiking in the middle of Ohio..
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2011
A pair of Chesapeake Bay Foundation employees left Annapolis Saturday morning on a 1,300-mile journey through the six states in the bay's watershed — by bicycle. John Rodenhausen and Beth McGee will attempt to ride through the 64,000-square-mile watershed, which stretches to Cooperstown, N.Y., and as far west as the Shenandoah Valley, to raise money for the Bay Foundation. They will spend their first night in southern Pennsylvania, pedal to New York and circle back through western Pennsylvania, then to Virginia and return via the Eastern Shore over the next three weeks.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Su | December 11, 2010
He'd just finished a club gig one February night and was sliding his guitar into the back of his SUV when Dana Biagini, a full-time Annapolis musician, heard the sounds of a commotion in the street. He turned his head to look, finished closing the trunk, and suddenly felt a strange pain shooting through the index finger on his playing hand. "It was such a freak thing. I looked down and saw it was bent, and I couldn't straighten it out," says Biagini, a veteran bass player and guitarist in the local music scene.
NEWS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,rick.maese@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
MOON TOWNSHIP, Pa. - With less than two weeks before the election, John McCain is eager for any vote he can get in Pennsylvania, a battleground state that could decide the fate of the Republican's bid for the White House. Even those like Jim Boni, who say that fixing the economy is critical but aren't sure that McCain can do it. Boni retired two years ago from the school district where he taught for 35 years, yet was repeatedly checking his watch as he sipped a cup of coffee yesterday and waited for his shift as a hotel shuttle driver to start.
NEWS
By Samantha Bennett | April 22, 2008
PITTSBURGH - Another day, another crowd of suits loitering beside police cars and SUVs in front of the Post-Gazette building. Another candidate is going to grace us with his or her presence and entourage. In the days before the primary, there has been such an invasion of candidates, pundits and press that the population of Western Pennsylvania has doubled. Now I know how Iowans and New Hampshire ... New Hampshirites? New Hampshireans? New Hampshirelles? ... feel when all these yahoos from the big cities parachute in and try to go all native on the locals.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | March 31, 2008
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- On Saturday night, Barack Obama went bowling for the first time in 30 years. Part of his new effort to get closer to working-class voters, the presidential candidate grabbed a bite at Altoona's Original Texas Hotdogs, then strapped on a pair of size 13 1/2 shoes at Pleasant Valley lanes, to cheers from patrons. He never loosened his tie and the bowling wasn't pretty - basketball's his game - but from a public-relations standpoint, it was a ten-strike. "Sen. Barack Obama makes a surprise visit to Altoona today," the local CBS TV station announced during the NCAA basketball playoffs.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | January 22, 2005
MY WEEKLY trip from Baltimore to Dover, Pa., to visit my 80-year-old friend Jim Jacques on his farm - 120 acres nestling in a bend in the Big Conewago Creek - has taken on wildly educational and entertaining overtones. Even Jim, a decidedly non-sports fan, wants to see if the Steelers and Eagles can do it. If the Keystone State was a key player in the November presidential election, necessitating endless hours of talk radio by which to judge Pennsylvanians' heart, soul and political leanings, what are we to make of Pennsylvania's currently hyperbolic state and status?
NEWS
June 14, 2014
I would like to personally thank The Sun's editorial board for providing the questionnaire responses of candidates for the primary election. I particularly would like to reference those provided by Tony Campbell, a Republican running for Baltimore County executive. Mr. Campbell has acknowledged growing up in western Pennsylvania and graduating from Blackhawk High School and the University of Pittsburgh. His roots are as a Pennsylvania Democrat. I found his answer regarding the creation of additional council districts to be ambiguous.
FEATURES
September 11, 2007
Sept. 11 2001 In the single worst act of terrorism committed on U.S. soil, nearly 3,000 people died when hijacked jetliners crashed into New York's World Trade Center and the Pentagon and in western Pennsylvania.
TRAVEL
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
A monthly series about weekend escapes for $500 or less. Tucked away in the mountains of Western Pennsylvania are two houses that the modern homeowner might not want to live in, but hundreds a day want to see. They are two of famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright's designs: Fallingwater and the lesser-known Kentuck Knob. The houses have no basements, attics or garages because Wright said such things encourage clutter. And the kitchens seem like afterthoughts, probably because Wright didn't cook.
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