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NEWS
September 19, 2007
Gov. Deval Patrick has heard the siren call of casinos, proposing that three be built in the state, including one in Western Massachusetts. We are confident, however, that the House, which contains the lawmakers who are best-informed and most realistic about casinos, will put the brakes on this proposal. Mr. Patrick argues the casinos will generate revenue for the state, but that is counterproductive if the casinos also drain away lottery money that is used to generate revenue for the state.
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NEWS
September 19, 2007
Gov. Deval Patrick has heard the siren call of casinos, proposing that three be built in the state, including one in Western Massachusetts. We are confident, however, that the House, which contains the lawmakers who are best-informed and most realistic about casinos, will put the brakes on this proposal. Mr. Patrick argues the casinos will generate revenue for the state, but that is counterproductive if the casinos also drain away lottery money that is used to generate revenue for the state.
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NEWS
March 28, 2003
A Georgetown University symposium tomorrow will present four Catholic women writers who will discuss the impact of their religion and heritage on their work. The symposium, "Catholicism, Ethnicity and American Fiction," will feature talks by Louisa Ermelino, the author of three novels celebrating New York City and her Italian heritage; Maria Amparo Escandon, born and raised in Mexico City and author of Esperanza's Book of Saints; Maureen Howard, author of nine novels and winner of the National Book Critics Award for her autobiography; and Suzanne Strempek Shea, who has written about life in New England in four novels set around her home region of Western Massachusetts.
NEWS
March 28, 2003
A Georgetown University symposium tomorrow will present four Catholic women writers who will discuss the impact of their religion and heritage on their work. The symposium, "Catholicism, Ethnicity and American Fiction," will feature talks by Louisa Ermelino, the author of three novels celebrating New York City and her Italian heritage; Maria Amparo Escandon, born and raised in Mexico City and author of Esperanza's Book of Saints; Maureen Howard, author of nine novels and winner of the National Book Critics Award for her autobiography; and Suzanne Strempek Shea, who has written about life in New England in four novels set around her home region of Western Massachusetts.
NEWS
By Gerald Renner and Gerald Renner,HARTFORD COURANT | May 22, 1999
SPENCER, Mass. -- "Come on," the monk says, taking his shepherd's crook to prod the ewe and her two lambs. "It's graduation day."The ewe is reluctant to leave the pen in the barn, so the Rev. Robert Morhous picks up her lambs and carries them outside.That motivates the mother ewe to follow. In the spring sunshine, the lambs wobble on their skinny legs before they find their footing in the unfamiliar mud. Then they do funny little leaps as if mounted on springs."That's the first time they discover the real world, and they are so happy," Morhous laughs.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | February 28, 1993
Starting in 1877, Connecticut banker Henry Wood Erving and his wife did something virtually unheard of each summer. They went antiquing. They didn't have to fight crowds at antiques shows or malls -- there were neither shows, malls nor crowds. Instead, it seems, they traveled around the New England countryside, following the rumor mill. They'd listen to the rumblings: "So and so has an old this" or, "A family has an old that," and they'd be off in their horse and buggy in pursuit of relics of early American life.
SPORTS
By Gary Davidson and Gary Davidson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 29, 2001
Tyler Meade assisted on Nathan Ong's decisive tally in the sixth minute of sudden death as Columbia United Premier defeated Western (Massachusetts) United, 2-1, for the under-13 boys title in the 26th annual Columbia Invitational Soccer Tournament yesterday at Fort Meade. United was the only area team to take home a crown in the event, which had 270 clubs competing in nine age groups for both boys and girls. Three other area teams lost in championship games. United forced the action in overtime, eventually gaining a right-side corner kick.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 9, 1998
The Spirit, which in two-thirds of its 18 games has been unable to average double figures in scoring, gets a huge boost this weekend with the return of Bo Vuckovic for games against Edmonton (tonight) and Cleveland (tomorrow) at Baltimore Arena.Despite missing the past six games, five of which were defeats, Vuckovic, who suffered a badly sprained ankle in practice a month ago, still holds the team scoring lead by a comfortable margin (56-38). He was, in fact, second in NPSL scoring when he went down after the first 12 games.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2005
The president of a Massachusetts community college will be named chancellor of the Community College of Baltimore County today. Sandra Kurtinitis, head of the 13,000-student Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester, Mass., will succeed Irving Pressley McPhail, who stepped down from his position in late June. Kurtinitis signed a three-year contract worth $190,000 annually. "I am both honored and humbled by the opportunity to bring leadership to the largest community college in Maryland," she said in a statement yesterday.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | January 29, 1991
Around the perimeter* NORTHEASTERN WINDS: One of New England's premier programs in the mid-1980s was Northeastern. The Boston school gained prominence thanks to Baltimoreans like Reggie Lewis, Kevin McDuffie and Derrick Lewis. All three are among the top nine scorers in Northeastern history, and while coach Karl Fogel can't anticipate similar numbers from them, he has three players from Lake Clifton with potential.Northeastern has eight seniors, which helps explain why two of the Lake Clifton grads are taking off the entire season as medical redshirts.
NEWS
By Gerald Renner and Gerald Renner,HARTFORD COURANT | May 22, 1999
SPENCER, Mass. -- "Come on," the monk says, taking his shepherd's crook to prod the ewe and her two lambs. "It's graduation day."The ewe is reluctant to leave the pen in the barn, so the Rev. Robert Morhous picks up her lambs and carries them outside.That motivates the mother ewe to follow. In the spring sunshine, the lambs wobble on their skinny legs before they find their footing in the unfamiliar mud. Then they do funny little leaps as if mounted on springs."That's the first time they discover the real world, and they are so happy," Morhous laughs.
NEWS
April 2, 1996
THE SELF-STYLED Freemen of Montana, holding off federal law enforcement, are in an American tradition as old as the republic. But so is the authority that must in the end prevail. Most of the Freemen were debtors who came to dispute the legitimacy of the political authority enforcing creditors' rights. So were some Chesapeake tobacco planters in the 1770s who became Patriots in the American Revolution.More relevant forerunners were the farmers of Western Massachusetts who rallied behind Capt.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1994
John R. Merritt, who retired in 1989 as superintendent of the Naval Academy Dairy in Gambrills, died yesterday of lung cancer at North Arundel Hospital. The Severn resident was 76.Mr. Merritt relished the job of managing the 856-acre farm in Anne Arundel County where 200 cows provided 1,000 gallons of milk daily for the Naval Academy's mess hall."He just loved farming every waking hour," recalled a son, Harry W. Merritt of Lexington, Ky. "He was also an ardent Orioles fan."Born in Lanesboro, Mass.
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