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November 6, 2013
Who is this wacko Tom Schaller, and why does he harbor so much hostility toward the people of Western Maryland ( "Don't secede; vote with your feet," Oct. 29)? The fact is that the interests of Maryland's western counties are not well represented by their state government. So why shouldn't they make some noise? Mr. Schaller labels these people as "Maryland haters. " After looking up his all-too-short biography on the Internet, it turns out that Mr. Schaller himself is not a native of Maryland but rather of New York and he has lived all over.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Joy remembers the day that risking a few dollars for fun turned into a rush she couldn't control. It was Feb. 14, 2000, at the casino in Charles Town, W.Va. She plunked some money into a slot machine, and out came hundreds of dollars - and the start of an addiction she could never satisfy. "I went out with $30 and went home with $400 and that's all she wrote," she said. Like an alcoholic who needs more drinks to get drunk, she needed to wager ever larger sums to recapture the thrill.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | April 23, 2012
It's a wet, snowy day in Western Maryland. The storm may not dump as much snow in Maryland as expected, or as much as has already fallen a bit further north, though. Traffic cameras show slick roadways and white on everything else. Forecasters are calling for 2-4 inches in Allegany and Garrett Counties, according to the National Weather Service. Two inches were reported in Frostburg as of 7 a.m., according to a weather spotter report to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
October 7, 2014
The development of natural gas supplies located deep in the rocky landscape of Western Maryland carries significant environmental risks, but there are regulations the state can impose that would reduce those dangers. The latest study of this issue - a draft report released last Friday by Maryland's Department of the Environment and Department of Natural Resources - takes a somewhat optimistic view of that circumstance, but isn't exactly a game-changer. The assessment looked at the various phases of the fracking process, from site preparation and drilling to production and finally, reclamation, and rated the potential risks involved from low to high.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
Ed Coile and his husband are true-blue Democrats. But they were thinking about saving money, not their congressional representation, when they decided to move from Washington to conservative Frederick County last year. "Politics just didn't play a role," said Coile, 52, after getting off the commuter train at the tiny red-brick MARC station in Western Maryland on the Virginia border. "This is where we could afford to buy a house. " Democratic strategists in this part of the state, however, are thinking an awful lot about transplants from the Washington area such as Coile and husband Barry Stampler.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Not since Brooks Robinson has any Arkansan been more welcome in Maryland than David Wrightam. And in the tiny Western Maryland hamlet of Williamsport, he may be getting top billing -- at least since last Friday, when he visited the town's Desert Rose Cafe in answer to a challenge from Howard County Executive and Democratic lieutenant governor candidate Ken Ulman. It seems Ulman was on a campaign swing through Western Maryland last week when he stopped at the Desert Rose and noticed a U.S. map owner Rose Harris had hanging on the wall.
NEWS
April 1, 2012
Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich will be campaigning in Western Maryland ahead of Tuesday's primary. Gingrich is scheduled to hold a rally at the Frederick Motor Company at 11 a.m. Monday and to speak at Hood College at 2 p.m. Hood spokesman Dave Diehl tells The Frederick News-Post that Gingrich's campaign called the college's director of student activities to schedule the visit. Gingrich will meet with student Republicans after his speech. Gingrich has conceded that Mitt Romney is the likely Republican nominee, and his campaign laid off one-third of its staff last week to save money.
NEWS
July 29, 2010
All who hate mosquitoes and garden pests should be pleased with the news that the "Bike trail will spare bat refuge" (July 27). The last thing the best bat cave in the East needed to face was construction for a bike path and a steady stream of bikers. People can pedal elsewhere. Whole bat species are struggling to survive against the march of white nose syndrome. This fungus has decimated bat populations in the Northeast and is relentlessly spreading. Mortality is over 90 percent once a winter roost is infected.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2010
There is little argument that fall is one of the most beautiful seasons of the year. And spending some of it among the mountains of Western Maryland is a sure bet, even if all you do is take in the views. So if you're looking for a change of scenery from your office cubicle, this week's Autumn Glory Festival in Garrett County is more than worth the trip. The 43rd annual fest offers dozens of activities taking place at a host of venues near Deep Creek Lake. There's a Haunted Mountain Coaster at Wisp.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2010
While Maryland's energy future might lie in harnessing the breezes off Ocean City, the frontier for now is in the same place it's always been — in the mountains of Western Maryland — where the region's winds and coal and natural gas reserves are drawing prospectors. That's unsettling to some environmentalists and Western Marylanders, who fear the impact of new and traditional energy development on the region's rich natural resources, its outdoors-oriented tourist industry and its rural quality of life.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
To hear Larry Hogan tell it, the multibillion-dollar effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay has been a dismal failure - and the biggest problem is getting Pennsylvania and New York to stop sending sediment pollution down the Susquehanna River. The Republican gubernatorial candidate vows to "stand up" for Maryland farmers, watermen and homeowners, who he contends have been unfairly burdened with the bay's restoration, and says he'd take the other states to court if necessary to get them to do more.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
- In the heart of this town on the old U.S. National Road in Western Maryland, a woman leans on the front desk of an 1890s-era hotel, her face a study in mixed emotions. Tina Storey loves her work as office manager of Failinger's Hotel Gunter, the grande dame of lodging in Frostburg with its polished oak staircase, Victorian settees and zillions of artifacts and displays that evoke the history of the so-called "Mountain Side of Maryland. " But she's still grieving the woman who revived the place.
NEWS
By Michael J. Wilson | September 1, 2014
Fifty years ago this week, the Food Stamp Act of 1964 was signed into law. The goal was to ensure that those of us with the least would not be without food. In the ensuing decades, the program adapted to cultural, economic and technological changes and has provided millions of people with better nutrition. Today, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, the modern incarnation of food stamps) remains our nation's most effective tool in the fight against hunger. The Food Supplement Program (FSP, Maryland's name for SNAP)
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Residents inundated by June floods in Western Maryland can apply for $5,000 in state cash, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Friday. The program will give grants to help cover medical, housing, and food expenses caused by June 12 flash floods that officials said destroyed about 200 homes in Allegany and Washington counties.  O'Malley promised the state would help ease the burden of distressed residents when he visited the area on Wednesday....
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 6, 2014
Top Maryland officials highlighted a change in the way hospitals are charging patients for treatment - and a related push to prevent unnecessary admissions -- during a stop Wednesday in Western Maryland. Maryland has long regulated hospital rates under a unique agreement with federal officials, but has altered its waiver in a way that provides hospitals with a budget based on their projected patient population rather than a fee for every service performed. The idea is to cut costs and improve care by encouraging more preventive measures.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Not since Brooks Robinson has any Arkansan been more welcome in Maryland than David Wrightam. And in the tiny Western Maryland hamlet of Williamsport, he may be getting top billing -- at least since last Friday, when he visited the town's Desert Rose Cafe in answer to a challenge from Howard County Executive and Democratic lieutenant governor candidate Ken Ulman. It seems Ulman was on a campaign swing through Western Maryland last week when he stopped at the Desert Rose and noticed a U.S. map owner Rose Harris had hanging on the wall.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2010
Two well-paying blue-collar employers in Washington County are shuttering their businesses, adding to the woes of this Western Maryland county that already has a jobless rate among the highest in the state. The soaring unemployment rate is a painful step back for a county that has tried in recent years to diversify its economy and attract new, high-technology businesses to the area. Known as "Hub City," Hagerstown has been at the center of a regional economy for years, with its highway connections and rail lines offering trucking and distribution companies easy access.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | April 20, 2012
Some weather models are predicting snow in Western Maryland on Monday, on the tail end of the rainy system expected to move through this weekend. But the chances are slim and variable, according to AccuWeather meteorologists. Moisture from a storm moving up from the Carolinas could meet cold air coming from the north, potentially producing the most snow in western Pennsylvania and New York, AccuWeather blogger Elliot Abrams wrote. But AccuWeather severe weather blogger Henry Margusity cautioned   factors including "the temperatures in the lower level of the atmosphere, the time of day the snow falls and the intensity of the snow" could determine whether it's something or nothing.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Stuart F. Oster, an environmental health specialist who worked for the Howard County Health Department, died June 28 of undetermined causes at his Ellicott City home. He was 55. "We are waiting for the results of the toxicologist's report from the medical examiner as to the cause of death," said a brother, Kevin R. Oster of Monkton. The son of Edwin F. Oster Jr., an engineer, and LaRue K. Oster, a homemaker, Stuart Frederick Oster was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville.
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