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NEWS
May 17, 2011
Regarding the story ("Western to review commencement policy," May 17) which said: "A tradition that permits only those graduates going on to four year colleges to participate in commencement exercises is being reconsidered at Western High School," I ask, what kind of tradition is that? The message I get is: If you don't go on to a 4 year college your education is meaningless. Drop out now. I'm speechless as I was when I learned a few weeks ago that the same school failed to send some student transcripts to colleges thus compromising their college acceptances.
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NEWS
May 30, 2014
I read the recent commentary regarding the Baltimore School for the Arts and can understand what Patricia Schultheis was saying about helping disadvantaged students like Jabril, but the BSFA has standards ( "Who is responsible for Jabril?" May 19). Yes it's a public school but the school maintains standards that all of our public schools should have. It's a shame that the standards of regular public schools have diminished so much that the children are running the school, some teachers only do they have to because their hands are tied and parents are missing in action.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
In the words of Shonda Green, she "really had it going on." Only 17, she had her career plotted: work as a fashion designer for a few years and later get into computer programming.She was focused, outgoing, confident and smart -- she scored more than 1,300 on her PSAT, the SAT pretest, last year, her junior year at Western High School. She was creative and wanted to become the "next Versace."On Friday, Shonda died at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center from injuries suffered Aug. 27 in a fire at a friend's house in Woodlawn.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Dyane Fancey, a prominent poet in Baltimore's arts community who also worked in the city school system and at a popular Mount Vernon restaurant, died April 13 of heart failure. The Hampden resident was 63. Born Diane Margaret Fancey in Washington, D.C., Ms. Fancey was the daughter of active labor union workers, and developed a feisty and rebellious attitude at an early age, replacing the "i" in her name with a "y" in order to distinguish herself from the other girls in her high school who shared her name and dotted the "i" in their names with hearts.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
County Planning Board members yesterday approved a site for the planned western high school between Route 108 and Trotter Road, saying neighbors' objections were not a consideration in the decision."
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | January 26, 1992
County school officials will learn by mid-March whether the state government will share construction costs for the $26 million western high school building in 1992-1993.School officials, representativesof the County Council and members of the local General Assembly delegation took their case to the state Board of Public Works last week, appealing the state Interagency Committee for School Construction's deferral of the project.They are seeking planning recognition, a prerequisite for state cost-sharing, and $8.7 million in state aid.The Board of Public Works -- the governor, state comptroller and state treasurer -- is expected to issue decisions in 45 days on projects appealed Wednesday by Howard and 11 other school systems.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | March 23, 2006
Western High School, Baltimore's prestigious all-girls public high school, has lowered its admissions standards to accept 125 freshmen who would have been rejected in years past, sparking cries of outrage from students and parents clamoring for quality public education in the city. Western has a 100 percent college acceptance rate. Despite that, school system officials say, they had to lower the standards for half of the 250 girls admitted to the school's class of 2010 because they didn't have enough qualified applicants.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2000
WHEN MILDRED Wyman Smith invited me to the 65th reunion of Western High School's Class of 1935, I asked, "What has it been, two years?" "No, it's been five," Smith said. "I don't know where the time went." Neither did I. I'd covered the class' 60th reunion banquet in the same room of the Pikesville Hilton and had forgotten that these women, now in their early 80s, have gathered every five years since they walked across Western's stage into the depths of the Depression on a muggy June night in 1935.
NEWS
May 3, 2011
April is the cruelest month: It's the time of year when the state's high school seniors anxiously await those long-anticipated college acceptance letters in the mail. As they focus on their futures, they have enough on their minds without having to worry about their high school guidance departments potentially failing to send academic transcripts and other required information to the schools they hope to attend in the fall. Yet that's what appears to have happened to at least a dozen of Western High School's 186 seniors this year.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
They came together Thursday, as they do every five years. They sang their school song, exchanged pictures of grandchildren, ate Pikesville Hilton chicken and thanked Providence "for still being able to limp in here," as one of them said.The reunion of the Western High School Class of 1935 attracted 81 women, about a fourth of the graduates who had walked across the commencement stage on North Avenue on a humid June evening 60 years ago.There wasn't a lot of speechifying at this year's gathering.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
A Baltimore high school teacher lost part of her finger Wednesday while breaking up a fight at Western High School, according to a school police report obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The incident took place about 2 p.m. when the teacher was attempting to intervene in an altercation among five students at the premier all-female high school, according to the report sent to school officials. During the altercation, which started when students were attempting to block other students from coming into a classroom, someone pushed the classroom door and the tip of the teacher's finger was partially cut off when it got caught in the door.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
Sarah A. Harris, a former longtime president of the Baltimore chapter of Hadassah who also was president of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, died Aug. 5 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at the North Oaks Retirement Community in Pikesville. She was 103. The daughter of Russian immigrant parents - her father, Samuel Fox, owned a Saratoga Street grocery store and later became a successful real estate owner, and her mother, Minnie Fox, was a homemaker - the former Sarah Ann Fox was born in Baltimore and raised on Callow Avenue.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
School never closed this summer for about 30 Baltimore City middle-school students. They arrive at Franklin Square Elementary/Middle School with enthusiasm for a day that may be shorter and more laid-back, but still enhances their academic and athletic skills. These kids are reading books of their own choosing, writing in their personal journals, zipping through math calculations and working out on the basketball court. They spend two hours a day in an air-conditioned classroom and two in the gym — cooled only with fans — at the school on West Lexington Street, a few miles from downtown.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Baltimore Reads hopes to collect 75,000 titles at its 17th annual Books for Kids Day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday on the parking lot of Poly-Western High School, Falls Road and Cold Spring Lane. The nonprofit organization, dedicated to fostering literacy, will accept new or gently used books and redistribute them through its Book Bank. It collects books for Baltimore-area schools, teachers, Head Start centers, social services agencies, community organizations and needy families. Since the book bank was founded 20 years ago, more than 1.6 million books have been collected and given away.
NEWS
May 18, 2011
What in the heck is wrong with our city schools? Your almost half page story about Western High School commencement policy ( "Western to review commencement policy" May 17) indicates there are some idiots in charge. Denial of the commencement right only because of post-graduate intentions, i.e., attending a four year college, borders on elitism, snobbery, whatever else one chooses to call it. It is also unconstitutional. If one attends four years and gets a lot of C's in the process but has passed all subjects, he/she is entitled to graduate with a formal commencement like everyone else.
NEWS
May 17, 2011
Baltimore school officials were wise to suspend the rule stating that only Western High School students accepted at four-year colleges could participate in this year's graduation ceremonies. Given that some Western students' college application efforts were botched by the school's failure to send transcripts and other materials to admissions offices, they could hardly have done otherwise. But the policy needs to be shelved for good. It is predicated on the one-size-fits-all notion that a four-year college education is the right path for every student.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | November 7, 2007
Jeanne Louise Baer, who taught at Western High School for nearly four decades, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 88 and had lived in Pimlico for many years. Born Jeanne Louise Groleau in Monaca, Pa., she earned a teaching degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She later attended the Johns Hopkins University. She moved to Baltimore and joined the Baltimore City Department of Education in 1941 and was a volunteer in the USO - a group whose members entertained military personnel at social gatherings - during World War II. "My mother loved dancing and meeting people," said her daughter, Deborah Baer of Cedarcroft.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
Facing a segregated Baltimore County school system that taught blacks only up to the 11th grade, Dorothy Briscoe and her parents did the one thing they knew would secure her a high school diploma.They told a fib.She pretended to be a Baltimore resident and signed up for Frederick Douglass High School by using a relative's address."But don't tell anyone," she said last week, laughing about her 50-year-old indiscretion.No one is likely to begrudge her the fib she told to get an education -- not now, as she retires as head of the mathematics department at Western High School, one of the city's elite.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
Gaetana Vitale was excited to start in the fall at Anne Arundel Community College studying pre-veterinarian science — until she says she was told the decision would cost her an opportunity to walk across a stage in front of her friends and family to receive her diploma from Western High School. So Vitale, 17, said she made a "last-ditch effort" to get an acceptance letter from a four-year college, Coppin State University, by May 1 to participate in the school's graduation ceremony, a longstanding requirement that Western school leaders said they will review this year to decide whether it should continue.
NEWS
May 17, 2011
Regarding the story ("Western to review commencement policy," May 17) which said: "A tradition that permits only those graduates going on to four year colleges to participate in commencement exercises is being reconsidered at Western High School," I ask, what kind of tradition is that? The message I get is: If you don't go on to a 4 year college your education is meaningless. Drop out now. I'm speechless as I was when I learned a few weeks ago that the same school failed to send some student transcripts to colleges thus compromising their college acceptances.
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