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By Richard M. Sudhalter and Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the Sun | November 18, 2001
There must be times, plenty of them, when Jim Chatters deeply rues the day he ever took Floyd Johnson's phone call. But then, neither man had any way of anticipating the firestorm of controversy, contumely and outright chicanery it would ignite. At issue was the very foundation of modern understanding of how, and by whom, the North American continent was first populated -- and, behind the scenes, some less-than-savory aspects of U.S. government defense policy. Chatters is a forensic anthropologist, with a small practice in Kennewick, one of three small cities straddling the Columbia River in the southern midsection of Washington state.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 24, 2012
What people go through to live their lives — war and terror, disease and pain, poverty and hunger, long journeys across continents and oceans, loss and heartbreak — always leaves me awed and humbled. You hear a story, like the one I'm offering this Christmas, and you want to raise a glass to that thing we call human spirit. Milla Dawt Hniang, who travels with crutches and guitar, has it in bunches. It has taken her 20 years past the age when her parents thought she would die. She's a Burmese-born singer-songwriter about to release her first CD and send more music of the American country-pop variety — think Taylor Swift — into the world.
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TOPIC
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2001
ST. MARC, Haiti -- Rodrigue Mortel rose from his peasant beginnings to get an education, thanks largely to the determination of his mother, and went on to a distinguished medical career in the United States. He didn't turn his back on his native land. Last month, a school he built for the poor of St. Marc, the city where he was born, opened with 63 kindergartners. Gerard Dormevil grew up in a mountainside village 2 1/2 hours north of St. Marc, one of eight children of a peasant farmer.
NEWS
January 20, 2010
Created as the ultimate "damned if you do, damned if you don't" matrix in Joseph Heller's novel of that name Catch 22, in simple terms, is the classic no-win or double bind situation and one in which the United States finds itself relative to the catastrophe in Haiti. Instantly off the mark in response to the earthquake and its aftermath, the Catch 22 scenario developed in a nanosecond. First, Rush Limbaugh, champion blowhard of America, condemned the Obama administration for acting far more quickly to the crisis in Haiti than it did when a maniac tried to explode his underwear on an airliner.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | December 20, 2009
Third night free in Garrett County What's the deal?: The Garrett County Chamber of Commerce is offering a promotion in partnership with 10 lodging companies ranging from rental homes to B&Bs to log cabin-style suites in which you stay two nights and get the third night free. Garrett County is home to Wisp Resort, the state's only ski resort, and the Adventure Sports Center International, one of only two recirculating white-water courses in the Western Hemisphere. The area also offers horse-drawn sleigh rides, dog sledding, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration, weary of the bruising annual debate with Congress over whether to certify that Mexico and other nations are cooperating in the war on illegal drugs, wants to drop that process altogether and replace it with an international treaty.A Western Hemisphere treaty on drugs has been discussed for several years. For the first time, however, the Clinton administration has said it regards the treaty as a substitute for certification."I hope in five years the United States, as one of 31 or 30 countries, has become part of a multinational attack," said Barry R. McCaffrey, the White House anti-narcotics czar.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 2, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Hours after the Supreme Court lifted an injunction that barred the forced return of Haitian exiles, the United States began sending refugees back to Haiti yesterday from the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.About 150 Haitians boarded a Coast Guard cutter yesterday afternoon for the trip to Port-au-Prince, the Haitian capital, said Lt. Cmdr. Gordon Hume, spokesman for the Joint Task Force managing the Haitian exile crisis.Haitians have been crowding into boats to flee a nation in political and economic turmoil since the military coup against the elected government of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide on Sept.
NEWS
January 20, 2010
Created as the ultimate "damned if you do, damned if you don't" matrix in Joseph Heller's novel of that name Catch 22, in simple terms, is the classic no-win or double bind situation and one in which the United States finds itself relative to the catastrophe in Haiti. Instantly off the mark in response to the earthquake and its aftermath, the Catch 22 scenario developed in a nanosecond. First, Rush Limbaugh, champion blowhard of America, condemned the Obama administration for acting far more quickly to the crisis in Haiti than it did when a maniac tried to explode his underwear on an airliner.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | November 6, 2009
"The doer is always conscienceless; no one has a conscience except the spectator." - Goethe These few words from the great German poet have what lawyers like to call "explanatory value." We spectators tend to huff and puff about broken campaign promises from our politicians. How can they renounce or ignore what they so earnestly promised when seeking our votes? The reality is, how can they not? No doubt you've noticed that it's only when their faction is out of power that politicians embrace a set of appealing "principles," which they cast aside upon attaining or regaining ruling power.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 24, 2012
What people go through to live their lives — war and terror, disease and pain, poverty and hunger, long journeys across continents and oceans, loss and heartbreak — always leaves me awed and humbled. You hear a story, like the one I'm offering this Christmas, and you want to raise a glass to that thing we call human spirit. Milla Dawt Hniang, who travels with crutches and guitar, has it in bunches. It has taken her 20 years past the age when her parents thought she would die. She's a Burmese-born singer-songwriter about to release her first CD and send more music of the American country-pop variety — think Taylor Swift — into the world.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | December 20, 2009
Third night free in Garrett County What's the deal?: The Garrett County Chamber of Commerce is offering a promotion in partnership with 10 lodging companies ranging from rental homes to B&Bs to log cabin-style suites in which you stay two nights and get the third night free. Garrett County is home to Wisp Resort, the state's only ski resort, and the Adventure Sports Center International, one of only two recirculating white-water courses in the Western Hemisphere. The area also offers horse-drawn sleigh rides, dog sledding, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | November 6, 2009
"The doer is always conscienceless; no one has a conscience except the spectator." - Goethe These few words from the great German poet have what lawyers like to call "explanatory value." We spectators tend to huff and puff about broken campaign promises from our politicians. How can they renounce or ignore what they so earnestly promised when seeking our votes? The reality is, how can they not? No doubt you've noticed that it's only when their faction is out of power that politicians embrace a set of appealing "principles," which they cast aside upon attaining or regaining ruling power.
NEWS
By Jennifer Pesonen and Jennifer Pesonen,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
It is usually believed that cavalry played a very minor role in the Gettysburg campaign, but nothing could be further from the truth. According to Edward G. Longacre's book The Cavalry at Gettysburg, published in 1986, the brigades led by Confederate Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and those of the Union's Brig. Gen. David McMurtie Gregg would take part in "one of the largest and most influential mounted battles ever waged in the Western Hemisphere." In the early morning of July 3, Stuart and Gregg eased their men into position.
TOPIC
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2001
ST. MARC, Haiti -- Rodrigue Mortel rose from his peasant beginnings to get an education, thanks largely to the determination of his mother, and went on to a distinguished medical career in the United States. He didn't turn his back on his native land. Last month, a school he built for the poor of St. Marc, the city where he was born, opened with 63 kindergartners. Gerard Dormevil grew up in a mountainside village 2 1/2 hours north of St. Marc, one of eight children of a peasant farmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard M. Sudhalter and Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the Sun | November 18, 2001
There must be times, plenty of them, when Jim Chatters deeply rues the day he ever took Floyd Johnson's phone call. But then, neither man had any way of anticipating the firestorm of controversy, contumely and outright chicanery it would ignite. At issue was the very foundation of modern understanding of how, and by whom, the North American continent was first populated -- and, behind the scenes, some less-than-savory aspects of U.S. government defense policy. Chatters is a forensic anthropologist, with a small practice in Kennewick, one of three small cities straddling the Columbia River in the southern midsection of Washington state.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2001
It would be hard to imagine a more striking contrast to the affluent congregation of St. Louis Roman Catholic Church in Clarksville than its sister parish of St. John the Evangelist in Gonaives, Haiti. "To visit the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere ... you can't even compare it to the poverty here," says St. Louis pastoral associate Anne Buening, who traveled to Haiti last summer. Buening had been a social worker in American inner cities, but she was not prepared for what she found in Haiti.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Polio, the dreaded scourge that killed or paralyzed millions of children worldwide and caused near-hysteria among U.S. parents during the first half of the century, has been eradicated from the Western Hemisphere, the World Health Organization declared yesterday.This achievement "should be a source of pride to all of us, and it shows what can be done when everybody works together for a common cause for the benefit of mankind," said Dr. Carlyle Guerra de Macedo, director of the Pan American Health Organization, or PAHO, which is the Western Hemisphere office of WHO."
FEATURES
By Robin and Arlene Karpan | October 6, 1991
The most beautiful land human eyes have ever seen" is how Christopher Columbus described the island of Hispaniola during his first voyage to the New World in 1492.More importantly, it was here that the epic traveler put down roots and paved the way for Spanish expansion into the Western Hemisphere.The Dominican Republic, which occupies the eastern two-thirds of the island, is busy preparing for the 500th anniversary of that discovery in 1992. Historic sites are being restored, celebrations are planned and even the pope is invited.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration, weary of the bruising annual debate with Congress over whether to certify that Mexico and other nations are cooperating in the war on illegal drugs, wants to drop that process altogether and replace it with an international treaty.A Western Hemisphere treaty on drugs has been discussed for several years. For the first time, however, the Clinton administration has said it regards the treaty as a substitute for certification."I hope in five years the United States, as one of 31 or 30 countries, has become part of a multinational attack," said Barry R. McCaffrey, the White House anti-narcotics czar.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Polio, the dreaded scourge that killed or paralyzed millions of children worldwide and caused near-hysteria among U.S. parents during the first half of the century, has been eradicated from the Western Hemisphere, the World Health Organization declared yesterday.This achievement "should be a source of pride to all of us, and it shows what can be done when everybody works together for a common cause for the benefit of mankind," said Dr. Carlyle Guerra de Macedo, director of the Pan American Health Organization, or PAHO, which is the Western Hemisphere office of WHO."
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