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BUSINESS
November 3, 1993
Output falls in Germany's westIndustrial output in western Germany fell a provisional 2 percent in September after rising 2.2 percent in August, the economics ministry said yesterday.But the figures are highly volatile, and the ministry said it expects an upward revision of the September data when they are finalized.Economists do not expect a general economic recovery in western Germany until well into 1994.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2004
FRANKFURT, Germany - A day after far-right parties made striking gains in state elections in eastern Germany, political analysts cautioned against drawing parallels to the rise of nazism during the Weimar Republic. The spectacle of angry and dispossessed voters turning to the extreme right wing, as they did this past weekend, has an obvious historical echo for Germans. But most experts said these parties would find it difficult to replicate their success in western Germany or on a national level.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 30, 1992
Elderly Americans are more satisfied with life than the elderly in other developed countries. They also seem more active, more independent, generally healthy and happy with the quality of their medical care.Those findings are part of a unique five-nation survey, released yesterday, in which older people were questioned about their attitudes toward everything from health to loneliness.Older Americans reported being "very satisfied with life" twice as often as the elderly in Japan and 50 percent more often than the elderly in western Germany.
NEWS
By Robert Gerald Livingston | April 2, 1997
TRAVEL THROUGHOUT the eastern part of Germany, the states that until 1990 composed the communist German Democratic Republic, and you see cranes, bulldozers and backhoes everywhere. Autobahns have been widened and resurfaced, railroad track relaid; shopping malls built outside large towns and small; and Dresden's baroque places along the Elbe are being lovingly restored.Behind such infrastructural improvements and a dramatic rise in eastern Germans' living standards (wages have been lifted to 80-90 percent of western levels)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 11, 1993
BONN, Germany -- Economics Minister Guenter Rexrodt delivered a gloomy assessment of Germany's short-term economic prospects yesterday, predicting zero growth this year as the country struggles to overcome the effects of a global slowdown and the task of rebuilding the former communist east."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 30, 1992
Elderly Americans are more satisfied with life than the elderly in other developed countries. They also seem more active, more independent, generally healthy and happy with the quality of their medical care.Those findings are part of a unique five-nation survey, released yesterday, in which older people were questioned about their attitudes toward everything from health to loneliness.Older Americans reported being "very satisfied with life" twice as often as the elderly in Japan and 50 percent more often than the elderly in western Germany.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2004
FRANKFURT, Germany - A day after far-right parties made striking gains in state elections in eastern Germany, political analysts cautioned against drawing parallels to the rise of nazism during the Weimar Republic. The spectacle of angry and dispossessed voters turning to the extreme right wing, as they did this past weekend, has an obvious historical echo for Germans. But most experts said these parties would find it difficult to replicate their success in western Germany or on a national level.
NEWS
July 5, 1991
Chilling as it was to read of German youths parading through Dresden last month spouting Hitlerian hate, this phenomenon needs to be seen in the context of jolting change and disruption in the eastern, formerly Communist regions of newly united Germany. Eruptions of nationalism and racism have been unwelcome fellow-travelers of freedom throughout what was the Soviet bloc. Though eastern Germany may be no different, its history is, and therefore the world watches.Unlike West German youngsters, East German youngsters were never taught that their nation bore responsibility for the horror and Holocaust of the Nazi era. Communist indoctrinators put out the line that capitalists and imperialists gave rise to Hitler, and they were all in residence in West Germany.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | November 26, 1990
BERLIN -- A near-breakdown of the former East German legal system is resulting in cynicism about the law and increased crime.Almost all the 1,493 judges and 1,237 state attorneys are suspected of having cooperated in some way with the much-hated Stasi secret police, but there is almost no way of checking their background.While legal officials try to sort out the mess and import judges from western Germany, crime has been soaring."It's a big job to reinstill respect for the law. For decades there was no real justice here, and people lost respect," said Hans-Joachim Jentsch, justice minister of the eastern German state of Thuringia.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special correspondent | February 9, 1992
HAMBURG, Germany -- Despite two years of radical political and economic changes in the former East Germany, Arno Meier gave up on his hometown and headed west to this bustling port city.Like up to 20,000 other eastern Germans who head west each month, Mr. Meier decided that change was not coming fast enough in the east and his best chance for a prosperous future lay in the west."If you look at the businesses over there, all the old bosses are the same. They're all in new political parties now, but they're the same people," said Mr. Meier, 48, who arrived in Hamburg last month.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 24, 1995
BONN, Germany -- Closing a final chapter of the Cold War, Germany's highest court ruled yesterday that East Germany's spymasters could not be tried in a reunited Germany and that top espionage officials already convicted would not have to serve their sentences.The ruling, on a 5-3 vote, amounted to a virtual amnesty for former Communist spymasters such as Markus Wolf, the shadowy figure behind three decades of East German intelligence operations.Under the decision, the highest-ranking espionage controllers of the former East Germany will no longer be obliged to serve sentences imposed on them or face criminal proceedings, even though many of the agents they ran will remain in jail.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1993
Output falls in Germany's westIndustrial output in western Germany fell a provisional 2 percent in September after rising 2.2 percent in August, the economics ministry said yesterday.But the figures are highly volatile, and the ministry said it expects an upward revision of the September data when they are finalized.Economists do not expect a general economic recovery in western Germany until well into 1994.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 23, 1993
BONN, Germany -- Answering calls from France and elsewhere to stimulate the sagging European economy, the German central bank again lowered two of its key interest rates yesterday amid signs that Germany's recession had worsened substantially in recent months.Symbolically at least, the Bundesbank's rate cuts, the second round in about a month, amounted to a German gesture of economic solidarity with France, its most important European partner, whose new government has been reducing its own interest rates and calling for the Bundesbank to cut its rates further.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 11, 1993
BONN, Germany -- Economics Minister Guenter Rexrodt delivered a gloomy assessment of Germany's short-term economic prospects yesterday, predicting zero growth this year as the country struggles to overcome the effects of a global slowdown and the task of rebuilding the former communist east."
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | December 28, 1992
KLEINMACHNOW, Germany -- People of the little suburba town of Kleinmachnow have taken to the streets in their fight to stay in the Hansel and Gretel houses where they live.They come out on Saturday mornings to stand in polite groups of 200 to 500 at the roads into their town. There they turn aside traffic from Berlin and let people know of their complaint -- one more legacy of the Berlin Wall, whose bare-dirt scar is still visible here.They protest government property policies that have allowed former owners in western Germany to make claims on 2,300 of 3,200 homes in Kleinmachnow in the three years since the reunification.
NEWS
By JEFFREY GEDMIN | November 29, 1992
As if to mock the tougher line German officials have been hinting at, extremists pounded Germany last week with one of its worst periods of right-wing violence since unification. The terror peaked early Monday when neo-Nazis firebombed two apartment buildings in a North Sea town, killing a Turkish woman and two girls, ages 10 and 14.More lives have already been taken this year by right-wingradicals and skinheads than the notorious Baader-Meinhof gang was able to extinguish at the height of its activity in 1977.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 3, 1990
BERLIN -- Helmut Kohl took his place in history as the first chancellor of a reunited Germany last night, after the first free all-German elections since 1932 swept his conservative Christian Democratic Union party to victory.Mr. Kohl had staked his political career on an unwavering commitment to swift unification of eastern and western Germany, and last night, the beaming chancellor embraced the reward."This is a day of joy," said Mr. Kohl, speaking in Bonn. "This is a great result, and we may take pride in it."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | April 27, 1992
The search ended simply enough when the telephone rang in Inge Calvert's Brooklyn Park home last Jan. 25. Her younger brother was callingfrom Germany, alive, well and anxious to know how she was doing.It had taken her 47 years to find him. The next day her older brothercalled, 47 years after she last saw him as a 7-year-old boy in theirhometown on the German-Polish border, the day she waved goodbye and moved to western Germany in search of work."They were just in shock as much as I was," said Calvert, 63. "They thought I had passed away."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 30, 1992
Elderly Americans are more satisfied with life than the elderly in other developed countries. They also seem more active, more independent, generally healthy and happy with the quality of their medical care.Those findings are part of a unique five-nation survey, released yesterday, in which older people were questioned about their attitudes toward everything from health to loneliness.Older Americans reported being "very satisfied with life" twice as often as the elderly in Japan and 50 percent more often than the elderly in western Germany.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 30, 1992
Elderly Americans are more satisfied with life than the elderly in other developed countries. They also seem more active, more independent, generally healthy and happy with the quality of their medical care.Those findings are part of a unique five-nation survey, released yesterday, in which older people were questioned about their attitudes toward everything from health to loneliness.Older Americans reported being "very satisfied with life" twice as often as the elderly in Japan and 50 percent more often than the elderly in western Germany.
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