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By Thomas L. Friedman | March 25, 2003
PARIS - There are three fronts in this Iraq war: One in Iraq, one between America and its Western allies and one between America and the Arab world. They are all being affected by this unilateral exercise of U.S. power. For now, I've embedded myself on the Western front, where, I can report, all is quiet. France is shocked and awed. No, there is no massive retreat here from the position staked out by the French government and public opinion against the war in Iraq. But the angry chasm this has opened between Paris and both London and Washington has shocked many people here and prompted some to ask whether France went too far. The title of the latest cover story in the French newsmagazine Le Point said it all: "Have They Gone Overboard?"
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NEWS
November 25, 2007
Steven David is the director of the certificate program in national security studies and professor of international relations at the Johns Hopkins University. His scholarly focus is on security issues arising from the developing world, with a special emphasis on the Middle East. He is now finishing his third book, on the implications for American security of civil conflict in key states. "History of the Peloponnesian War" / by Thucydides / Penguin Classics / 656 pages / $15 A great work showing the enduring truths of human nature and international politics.
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NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | January 22, 1995
50 Years Ago* Reports are current that the Navy Department has renewed its interest in acquisition of the St. John's College campus for expansion of the Naval Academy. The present quarters are inadequate as a training school for what has become the world's greatest Navy. -- The Sun, Feb. 12, 1945.* The 76th Infantry Division, organized and for many months trained at Fort Meade, is now in combat as a part of Lieut. Gen. George S. Patton's Army on the Western front. -- The Sun, Feb. 13, 1945.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | July 27, 2006
Those of us old enough to remember World War II face many painful reminders of how things have changed in Americans' behavior during a war. Back then, the president's defeated opponent in the 1940 election, Wendell Willkie, not only supported the war, he became a personal envoy from President Franklin D. Roosevelt to British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. We were all in it together - and we knew it. People who had been highly critical of American foreign policy before we were attacked at Pearl Harbor now fell silent and devoted themselves to winning the war. What if the people, institutions, and attitudes of today were somehow taken back in time to World War II?
NEWS
July 25, 2003
Jack Davis, 108, long recognized as Britain's oldest World War I veteran, died Sunday in a nursing home in Stoke Hammond, Buckinghamshire, England. Mr. Davis lived to mourn almost all of the 5 million Britons who fought with him in the war. "They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old; age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them," his voice boomed out in a typical Flanders Fields observance in Belgium last year.
NEWS
November 27, 1997
HERE ARE a few footnotes on World War I. The A group is less taxing than the B group, which is for serious Great War junkies.PeopleA) Baron Manfred von Richthofen. was the war's top-scoring air ace and, thanks to the ''Peanuts'' cartoon, may be its best-remembered figure. The real Red Baron racked up 80 victories before being shot down and killed in 1918.B) Expatriate American Gene Bullard was heavily decorated for bravery in the French Foreign Legion, then transferred to the French air force and became the world's first black fighter pilot.
NEWS
November 25, 2007
Steven David is the director of the certificate program in national security studies and professor of international relations at the Johns Hopkins University. His scholarly focus is on security issues arising from the developing world, with a special emphasis on the Middle East. He is now finishing his third book, on the implications for American security of civil conflict in key states. "History of the Peloponnesian War" / by Thucydides / Penguin Classics / 656 pages / $15 A great work showing the enduring truths of human nature and international politics.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | July 27, 2006
Those of us old enough to remember World War II face many painful reminders of how things have changed in Americans' behavior during a war. Back then, the president's defeated opponent in the 1940 election, Wendell Willkie, not only supported the war, he became a personal envoy from President Franklin D. Roosevelt to British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. We were all in it together - and we knew it. People who had been highly critical of American foreign policy before we were attacked at Pearl Harbor now fell silent and devoted themselves to winning the war. What if the people, institutions, and attitudes of today were somehow taken back in time to World War II?
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 22, 1996
YPRES, Belgium -- All is not quiet on the Western Front.Here on one of World War I's busiest and bloodiest battlefields, unexploded artillery shells stir from an 80-year slumber, rising by the thousands from the mud of Flanders.Some are awakened by plows and backhoes. Others are simply heaved to the surface by the steady workings of frost and thaw. Having outlived nearly everyone who once built them, fired them or cowered beneath their flight, the shells remain ready to kill. And sometimes not even the full-time efforts of 73 Belgian soldiers and civilians are enough to stop them.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2005
At last, it had come. Sixty years ago today, the news the world had waited to hear for five years, eight months and six days - ever since Hitler's army invaded Poland - came from a schoolhouse in Reims, France. Edward Kennedy, the Associated Press chief on the Western front, was first to flash the word of Germany's surrender to a war-weary world. "Germany surrendered unconditionally to the Western Allies and Russia at 0241 (French time) today in the big Reims red schoolhouse which is the headquarters of Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower," Kennedy wrote.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2005
At last, it had come. Sixty years ago today, the news the world had waited to hear for five years, eight months and six days - ever since Hitler's army invaded Poland - came from a schoolhouse in Reims, France. Edward Kennedy, the Associated Press chief on the Western front, was first to flash the word of Germany's surrender to a war-weary world. "Germany surrendered unconditionally to the Western Allies and Russia at 0241 (French time) today in the big Reims red schoolhouse which is the headquarters of Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower," Kennedy wrote.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 11, 2004
La Fanciulla del West - profound tale of morality and the redemptive power of love, or Cliche City in chaps? Either way, Puccini's opera provides 10-gallon's worth of good old entertainment, not to mention some of his most brilliantly organized and orchestrated music. It works the way even Hollywood's lesser oaters can, by presenting familiar characters and situations, conflicts and resolutions, in a setting we know - and, deep down, prefer - to be mythologized. As the Baltimore Opera Company's first-ever staging of Fanciulla reaffirms, there is plenty of vigor in this 1910 horse.
NEWS
July 25, 2003
Jack Davis, 108, long recognized as Britain's oldest World War I veteran, died Sunday in a nursing home in Stoke Hammond, Buckinghamshire, England. Mr. Davis lived to mourn almost all of the 5 million Britons who fought with him in the war. "They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old; age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them," his voice boomed out in a typical Flanders Fields observance in Belgium last year.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 25, 2003
PARIS - There are three fronts in this Iraq war: One in Iraq, one between America and its Western allies and one between America and the Arab world. They are all being affected by this unilateral exercise of U.S. power. For now, I've embedded myself on the Western front, where, I can report, all is quiet. France is shocked and awed. No, there is no massive retreat here from the position staked out by the French government and public opinion against the war in Iraq. But the angry chasm this has opened between Paris and both London and Washington has shocked many people here and prompted some to ask whether France went too far. The title of the latest cover story in the French newsmagazine Le Point said it all: "Have They Gone Overboard?"
NEWS
September 8, 2002
THE SPECTACULAR engagements in the war against terrorism have taken place in the dust-brown regions of central and southern Asia, where bombings and assassinations and betrayals and the hunt for Osama bin Laden still continue. Asia is crucial, but the action there tends to mask a fundamental truth about this struggle: The staging ground for terror isn't in Asia at all, but in Europe. In recent weeks, the Dutch rounded up men suspected of helping to finance terrorist groups. The Swedes arrested a man with a gun trying to get on a plane; his motives are unclear.
NEWS
November 27, 1997
HERE ARE a few footnotes on World War I. The A group is less taxing than the B group, which is for serious Great War junkies.PeopleA) Baron Manfred von Richthofen. was the war's top-scoring air ace and, thanks to the ''Peanuts'' cartoon, may be its best-remembered figure. The real Red Baron racked up 80 victories before being shot down and killed in 1918.B) Expatriate American Gene Bullard was heavily decorated for bravery in the French Foreign Legion, then transferred to the French air force and became the world's first black fighter pilot.
NEWS
September 8, 2002
THE SPECTACULAR engagements in the war against terrorism have taken place in the dust-brown regions of central and southern Asia, where bombings and assassinations and betrayals and the hunt for Osama bin Laden still continue. Asia is crucial, but the action there tends to mask a fundamental truth about this struggle: The staging ground for terror isn't in Asia at all, but in Europe. In recent weeks, the Dutch rounded up men suspected of helping to finance terrorist groups. The Swedes arrested a man with a gun trying to get on a plane; his motives are unclear.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 11, 2004
La Fanciulla del West - profound tale of morality and the redemptive power of love, or Cliche City in chaps? Either way, Puccini's opera provides 10-gallon's worth of good old entertainment, not to mention some of his most brilliantly organized and orchestrated music. It works the way even Hollywood's lesser oaters can, by presenting familiar characters and situations, conflicts and resolutions, in a setting we know - and, deep down, prefer - to be mythologized. As the Baltimore Opera Company's first-ever staging of Fanciulla reaffirms, there is plenty of vigor in this 1910 horse.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 20, 1997
MOSCOW -- Igor Podgorny has a simple way to explain Russia's problem with NATO plans to expand its membership eastward into former Soviet bloc nations ."Suppose I have a nice little summer cottage," the thermonuclear physicist and World War II veteran says with a big, friendly smile."And suppose my neighbor gets a submachine gun. He points it toward my summer cottage. He tells me he just wants to ensure his security, even though he feels peaceful toward me."The United States says it wants to be considered friendly.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1996
"The world went mad yesterday with a divine madness. It was good, it was noble to be insane," said The Sun in an editorial the day after Germany surrendered at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918."Joy had only one language, and that was a cry of happiness that sounded around. The pent-up emotions of four years of hopes and fears broke the restraining barriers of doubt and swept through the earth in a mighty volume of triumphant sound It was Christmas on the 11th of November, the Day of Days had dawned at last," said the newspaper.
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