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By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Securities Data Co.Staff Writer | June 1, 1993
Whether driven by out-of-control budget deficits, embarrassingly inefficient services or just a new-found commitment to the open market, Western Europe's governments are embarking on an unprecedented round of privatization.The moves, which could fill governments' coffers with $65 billion over the next two years, would see the sale of companies such as Renault, Air France and VEBA -- symbols of state-owned business might that was once touted as la difference between continental Europe's government planning and other countries' heavier reliance on the market.
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NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe and Sheilah Kast | November 8, 2009
To Americans, the fall of the Berlin Wall 20 years ago this week - and the Iron Curtain with it - was more than a big move on the geostrategic chessboard. Yes, it made us safer, but it also vindicated our core national identity. Democracy, it seemed to prove, is such a universal value that it will inevitably defeat dictatorship. Since 1989, this conclusion, which spans the ideological spectrum in America, has helped drive everything from U.S. support for expansion of trade with China to the collapse of the pro-American dictator in Indonesia to the war in Iraq and continued sanctions on Myanmar and Cuba.
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NEWS
By Gerald Horne | February 23, 1997
MARYLAND HAS had the good fortune of being the home of two of the best of African-American leaders of the past two centuries. The example provided by Frederick Douglass and W.E.B. Du Bois - most notably their global outlook - continues to provide instructive lessons for today.Douglass, born a slave, spent his early years in Maryland before moving on to Massachusetts and New York. Though a noted orator and writer, perhaps his major contribution to the struggle for freedom was his frequent trips abroad to rally support for the anti-slavery struggle here.
NEWS
June 10, 2008
LJUBLJANA, Slovenia - President Bush's weeklong tour through Berlin, Rome, Paris and London appears every bit the glamorous old-style farewell tour with a leisurely schedule, jaunts to country castles and lavish dinners. But it's actually a high-stakes diplomatic mission, spurred by Bush's fear that Iran is an increasingly urgent threat and that Europe may not take it seriously enough. Bush has never been popular in Western Europe after the U.S. invasion of Iraq. "A lot of people like America.
NEWS
February 11, 1991
If all the Soviet citizens who wanted to emigrate were allowed to do so, how many would that be? One million? Thirty million? The Western world is about to find out. A law liberalizing migration passed first reading in the Soviet parliament and could receive final approval after Feb. 18.Soviet officials promise a six-month delay between passage and implementation of the reform to allow for issuance of passports and the like. Prospective host nations will need all that time and more. Some are close to panic.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- About 80 caches of U.S. weapons, hidden by CIA agents in Austria decades ago, pose a problem for U.S. diplomats and intelligence officers.The caches, dating from the early years of the Cold War, contain mortars and submachine guns, explosives and radio equipment. They were part of a network of "stay-behind" supplies tucked away throughout Western Europe and intended to supply local guerrillas in case of a Soviet invasion.Local paramilitaries, many with World War II resistance backgrounds, were trained to use them.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Soviet Union's former East European allies joined the United States and Western Europe yesterday in refusing to move forward on new conventional forces talks until the Soviets comply with an arms treaty signed last year.As talks opened in Vienna, Austria, on troop levels in Europe, the United States said it would not engage in substantive negotiations until problems with the Conventional Forces in Europe treaty were solved.Secretary of State James A. Baker III discussed the problems Wednesday with Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 9, 1991
BRUSSELS -- Western Europe's political leaders will meet today and tomorrow to try to forge their diverse nations into a unified continent that could ultimately rival the United States in diplomatic as well as economic might.A "United States of Europe," if one is to develop at all, remains years or probably decades away. The immediate goals are more modest: to cement Western Europe's economic union, which began in earnest in the mid-1980s, and to support it with "political union" -- a mechanism for developing common policies in such areas as foreign relations and even defense.
NEWS
By DANIEL HAMILTON | May 22, 1991
Washington. -- Before our eyes, the walls in Europe are going up again. This time, they are being built by the West.Economic deprivation and hunger, ethnic upheaval and social dislocation are having a dramatic impact on a free Europe in which borders are losing their divisive character. East Europeans and North Africans are beating down the doors to the rich, successful and secure societies of Western Europe. Soon they could be joined by millions of Soviet citizens using their hard-won right to free travel.
NEWS
June 2, 1994
President Clinton's first official visit to Western Europe calls to mind some incendiary comments made by former German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt about how Americans go about choosing their leaders. The time was the early Eighties, soon after Ronald Reagan took office. Mr. Schmidt was in his usual arrogant state of mind.His disdain for President Jimmy Carter was already legendary. What was new was his low opinion of Mr. Reagan, then embroiled in the backlash of some unfortunate remarks about how he would conduct a nuclear defense of Western Europe.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[ Special to The Sun] | August 26, 2007
The Most Noble Adventure The Marshall Plan and the Time When America Helped Save Europe By Greg Behrman Free Press / 448 pages / $27 World War II left Europe in ruins. More than 36 million people had died. With half of the houses in major cities reduced to rubble, 13 million more were "displaced persons." Winston Churchill watched as "a vast quivering mass of tormented, hungry, careworn and bewildered human beings ... scanned the dark horizons for the approach of some new peril, tyranny or terror.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | November 27, 2006
ATLANTA -- Perhaps President Bush believes the ultraconservative political operatives who claim the GOP lost its majority because the party didn't move far enough to the right. Or perhaps the president just has no use for moderate politics or bipartisan compromise. Whatever the reason, Mr. Bush continued his dogged resistance to reality - and the conventions of the 21st century - several days ago when he gave the job of overseeing federally funded family planning programs to Dr. Eric Keroack.
NEWS
By JIM GOODBY AND KENNETH WEISBRODE | February 27, 2006
The Bush administration's rhetoric about bringing freedom to the people of North Korea and the Middle East is intended to sow the seeds for a future democratic peace in both regions. But the soil remains infertile. As we have seen recently in Palestine, Iran and Iraq, free elections do not automatically lead to democracy. A new tone - and strategy - are needed. This starts with a more realistic appreciation of the forces that drive regional powers to arm and threaten their neighbors - namely, strident nationalism, racial ideology and volatile borders.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | January 2, 2006
MOSCOW -- The tense relationship between Russia and Ukraine soured further yesterday when Russia's natural gas monopoly made good on its threat to cut shipments to its western neighbor after the two sides failed to agree on the terms of a price increase. The bold step by Gazprom, a monopoly that supplies Ukraine with about a third of its natural gas, came after Ukraine rejected an 11th-hour proposal by Russian President Vladimir V. Putin that would have delayed for three months a steep increase.
NEWS
July 14, 2005
THE SUICIDE bomber has reached Western Europe's shores. From Jerusalem to Casablanca to Baghdad, the terrorist has plied his evil ways, detonating a belt of explosives to kill and maim and terrorize in a ghastly display of self-destruction. For years now, the strategy of suicide bombings has been considered a creation of another culture, viewed from afar with horror but also a disquieting sense of relief that this twisted brand of political warfare was peculiar to the Middle East. We can no longer take comfort in that.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews | June 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - It was no accident that a major international conference on aiding Iraq recently occurred in Brussels, headquarters of the European Union. But just when President Bush realizes that he needs Europe, the continent has been thrown into what may be a long period of internal debate following French and Dutch voters' rejection of a new EU constitution. The political turmoil will likely turn its leaders' attention away from world trouble spots and limit what help they can give the United States.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | October 2, 1990
A panel of experts gathered by Planned Parenthood of Maryland asserted yesterday that the United States lags many years behind Western Europe and even some Third World nations in making new forms of contraceptions available.The experts -- who included physicians, research scientists and family-planning advocates -- blamed the sluggish pace of contraceptive development on a lack of federal research grants, DTC corporate fears that birth control is unprofitable and the specter of multimillion-dollar liability suits.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2003
CONSTANTA, Romania - Kurt Sanger is only a captain, and so he will leave to higher-ups the question of whether Romania would make a good ally, as the United States sets about a historic reordering of its military alliances from its old friends in Western Europe to new ones in the east. He does, however, have some thoughts about Romania as a place where American soldiers like him, perhaps soon, might find a new home. "Paradise isn't too strong a word," said Sanger, 31, a U.S. Marine reservist.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 17, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush announced yesterday that he is altering how and where U.S. forces are deployed abroad, closing scores of military installations in Western Europe and redeploying up to 70,000 troops in Europe and Asia to new countries or back to the United States over the next decade. Bush, during a stop in the campaign battleground state of Ohio, said he envisions a more agile and lethal military than the one designed for the Cold War, a reshaped force that could respond quickly to modern threats such as terrorists and rogue states.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 12, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. -- President Bush delivered a speech last week to the National Endowment for Democracy. Quoting Ronald Reagan's 1982 address at Westminster Palace, in which Mr. Reagan spoke of a turning point in history, Mr. Bush noted Mr. Reagan had argued that Soviet communism had failed "precisely because it did not respect its own people -- their creativity, their genius and their rights." The Bush address understandably came from a Western perspective. But, as former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher noted at a U.N. disarmament conference more than two decades ago, we in the West make a mistake when we "transpose" our morality on those who don't share it. President Bush asked, "Are the peoples of the Middle East somehow beyond the reach of liberty?"
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