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By Scott Shane | March 10, 1992
In the room the women come and goTalking of Michelangelo.! -- T.S. EliotWhat would Buonarroti think,Landing in U.S.A. today?From Toys-R-Us to Compu-LinkHis name's our culture's main mainstay.At first, perhaps, he'd be amazedHis genius spans the centuries.Pieta still leaves 'em dazed;Sistine's ceiling still can please.''Nah, Mikie's not some boring dead guy --like, this turtle freak, y'know?''(As some kind kid would clarify)''These chemicals, like, made him grow.''As Buonarroti scratched his headSome hardened software type would say:''Your hard disk data's simply deadIf Michelangelo has its way.''Thus, baffled, would the great man flee-- With floppy disk and turtle gum, too --Back to the 16th centuryTo tell them just what things would come to.Buonarroti saw in marbleHeroes struggling to be free.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 5, 2007
The Rape of Europa horrifies you with its depiction of the Nazis' assault on Western culture but also inspires you with its portrait of dedicated museum workers and archivists and a U.S. Army team known as "monuments men" who saved much of Europe's artistic legacy from destruction. In this cogent documentary, writers-directors Richard Berge, Bonni Cohen and Nicole Newnham, working from Lynn H. Nicholas' groundbreaking 1994 book, take an illuminating and inclusive look at their still-incendiary subject.
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NEWS
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | March 21, 1993
CULTURE AND IMPERIALISM.Edward W. Said.Knopf.360 pages. $25.Mansfield Park in Jane Austen's novel represents the virtues of English life: humane order and a gracious material prosperity, temperately enjoyed. Sir Thomas Bertram is the Prospero of this kingdom, and his impoverished niece, Fanny Price, sparks her way up through distractions and conflicts to be worthy of it. We are gratified and more. Austen did for her four-square theme what Mozart did for the dominant-tonic cadence.Dr. Edward W. Said, a consciously complicated man, is a professor of comparative literature, an expounder of his lover's quarrel with Joseph Conrad and other great Western writers, a polemicist for the Palestinian cause, and a musicologist.
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2006
The Ethical Assassin David Liss The Sultan's Seal Jenny White W.W. Norton & Co. / 384 pages / $24.95 The Ottoman Empire conjures up images of decadence, intrigue and secrecy, which makes it surprising that this time period is hardly explored in crime fiction. Along comes anthropologist and scholar Jenny White to delve into the sumptuous depths and murky conflicts of that earlier time, delivering a thoughtful, highly absorbing debut with a compelling mystery at its center. Kamil Pasha, a magistrate in the newly formed secular courts of the late 1880s, is asked to investigate the murder of a young English governess found drowned in the river.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 30, 1992
TEHRAN, Iran -- The Muslim clerics who set out 14 years ago to rid Iran of the decadence of secular Western culture are fighting a losing battle against a host of black marketeers who provide everything from music videos of Madonna to novels by Emile Zola.The tapes of banned Iranian singers and Western pop stars, especially female soloists, are sold under the counter or out of the trunks of cars.Worn copies of the prohibited works of authors like Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Milan Kundera, who deal with the intricacies of human relationships, are passed hand to hand.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | August 1, 1995
BEIJING -- In many ways, Liu Dongkai is terribly proud of his son. The young man graduated high school this year, has been accepted to study science at an elite university and stands a good chance of landing a four-year scholarship.One thing, though, troubles Mr. Liu, a professor of Chinese philosophy at Beijing University."He thinks that what I do is a waste of time. He doesn't know anything about Chinese philosophy or culture and has no interest in it at all," says Mr. Liu. "He thinks it's irrelevant to the present -- especially to making money."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 5, 2007
The Rape of Europa horrifies you with its depiction of the Nazis' assault on Western culture but also inspires you with its portrait of dedicated museum workers and archivists and a U.S. Army team known as "monuments men" who saved much of Europe's artistic legacy from destruction. In this cogent documentary, writers-directors Richard Berge, Bonni Cohen and Nicole Newnham, working from Lynn H. Nicholas' groundbreaking 1994 book, take an illuminating and inclusive look at their still-incendiary subject.
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2006
The Ethical Assassin David Liss The Sultan's Seal Jenny White W.W. Norton & Co. / 384 pages / $24.95 The Ottoman Empire conjures up images of decadence, intrigue and secrecy, which makes it surprising that this time period is hardly explored in crime fiction. Along comes anthropologist and scholar Jenny White to delve into the sumptuous depths and murky conflicts of that earlier time, delivering a thoughtful, highly absorbing debut with a compelling mystery at its center. Kamil Pasha, a magistrate in the newly formed secular courts of the late 1880s, is asked to investigate the murder of a young English governess found drowned in the river.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 1, 1994
TOKYO -- In this city's chic Roppongi district, a record store known as The Wave is a beacon to the young, announcing its presence in neon letters 10 feet tall. Yesterday, at rush hour, as music blared from loud speakers, it was packed with fashionably dressed young men and women poring over its seemingly inexhaustible stock.It could have been a scene from any U.S. metropolis such as New York or Los Angeles -- except that the music booming through the store was Wagner's opera Tannhauser and the CDs of choice for the hip were classical, not pop.The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, which begins a three-week swing through Japan with a concert in Fuji tonight, is discovering on its Asia tour that there is far more interest in classical music here than in the United States, particularly among the young.
NEWS
By R. C. Longworth | May 18, 1997
In mid-1993, Harvard Professor Samuel P. Huntington published an article in Foreign Affairs that sparked more debate than anything the magazine had published in the previous 45 years. Huntington argued that with the Cold War's end, the ideological divisions among nations had been replaced by divisions of historical cultures and civilizations. While much of the world still was locked in Cold War thinking, Huntington was predicting that "the fault lines between [these] civilizations will be the battle lines of the future."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
As a student at Washington's H.D. Woodson High School, her teachers made sure that Sandy Bellamy learned all about the black artists, writers and performers who have contributed so much to Western culture - even if many academic textbooks and curricula ignore them. Much of her professional life has been spent ensuring other children gain a similar awareness of the diversity of our culture - a job that should become much easier, given yesterday's announcement that she has been named executive director of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
TORONTO - Roman Catholic youths from around the world gave Pope John Paul II a rowdy welcome worthy of a rock star yesterday as the pontiff called on them to reject the hatred of violence and terror and to resist the materialism of Western culture. A cheering crowd of about 400,000 youths from 170 nations gathered at a public park on the shores of Lake Ontario to greet Pope John Paul, who made his first appearance at the weeklong 17th World Youth Day celebration. The crowd included more than 50,000 from the United States.
NEWS
By Shira J. Boss and Shira J. Boss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 1999
ISTANBUL, Turkey -- As foreign languages infiltrate Turkey's schools and culture, Turkish is starting to sound like Turkey talk.Just as Americans will toss an occasional "je ne sais quoi" into conversation, Turkish intellectuals pepper their speech with foreign words and phrases.But not always for show. After so much reading and research in foreign languages, the elite are forgetting their native tongue.Sometimes the use of English is snobbish, admits Gursel Ugurlu, head of the English department at Sultan Fatih private high school in Istanbul.
NEWS
By R. C. Longworth | May 18, 1997
In mid-1993, Harvard Professor Samuel P. Huntington published an article in Foreign Affairs that sparked more debate than anything the magazine had published in the previous 45 years. Huntington argued that with the Cold War's end, the ideological divisions among nations had been replaced by divisions of historical cultures and civilizations. While much of the world still was locked in Cold War thinking, Huntington was predicting that "the fault lines between [these] civilizations will be the battle lines of the future."
NEWS
By Merle Rubin and Merle Rubin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 1995
Far from being bastions of civility, civilized and civilizing places that give students a safe place to learn and develop, schools have become battlegrounds for skirmishes in the "culture wars." Subject to pressures from government on the one hand and outraged parents and "communities" on the other, the prestige and independence of public schools have been eroded to a point where it seems a wonder they can function at all.What children are taught at school can be - indeed, often should be - a kind of counterweight to what they learn at home or in the streets.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | August 1, 1995
BEIJING -- In many ways, Liu Dongkai is terribly proud of his son. The young man graduated high school this year, has been accepted to study science at an elite university and stands a good chance of landing a four-year scholarship.One thing, though, troubles Mr. Liu, a professor of Chinese philosophy at Beijing University."He thinks that what I do is a waste of time. He doesn't know anything about Chinese philosophy or culture and has no interest in it at all," says Mr. Liu. "He thinks it's irrelevant to the present -- especially to making money."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
TORONTO - Roman Catholic youths from around the world gave Pope John Paul II a rowdy welcome worthy of a rock star yesterday as the pontiff called on them to reject the hatred of violence and terror and to resist the materialism of Western culture. A cheering crowd of about 400,000 youths from 170 nations gathered at a public park on the shores of Lake Ontario to greet Pope John Paul, who made his first appearance at the weeklong 17th World Youth Day celebration. The crowd included more than 50,000 from the United States.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
As a student at Washington's H.D. Woodson High School, her teachers made sure that Sandy Bellamy learned all about the black artists, writers and performers who have contributed so much to Western culture - even if many academic textbooks and curricula ignore them. Much of her professional life has been spent ensuring other children gain a similar awareness of the diversity of our culture - a job that should become much easier, given yesterday's announcement that she has been named executive director of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 1, 1994
TOKYO -- In this city's chic Roppongi district, a record store known as The Wave is a beacon to the young, announcing its presence in neon letters 10 feet tall. Yesterday, at rush hour, as music blared from loud speakers, it was packed with fashionably dressed young men and women poring over its seemingly inexhaustible stock.It could have been a scene from any U.S. metropolis such as New York or Los Angeles -- except that the music booming through the store was Wagner's opera Tannhauser and the CDs of choice for the hip were classical, not pop.The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, which begins a three-week swing through Japan with a concert in Fuji tonight, is discovering on its Asia tour that there is far more interest in classical music here than in the United States, particularly among the young.
NEWS
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | March 21, 1993
CULTURE AND IMPERIALISM.Edward W. Said.Knopf.360 pages. $25.Mansfield Park in Jane Austen's novel represents the virtues of English life: humane order and a gracious material prosperity, temperately enjoyed. Sir Thomas Bertram is the Prospero of this kingdom, and his impoverished niece, Fanny Price, sparks her way up through distractions and conflicts to be worthy of it. We are gratified and more. Austen did for her four-square theme what Mozart did for the dominant-tonic cadence.Dr. Edward W. Said, a consciously complicated man, is a professor of comparative literature, an expounder of his lover's quarrel with Joseph Conrad and other great Western writers, a polemicist for the Palestinian cause, and a musicologist.
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