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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Evening Sun Staff | September 23, 1991
DURING THE PAST few years, scholar Martin Bernal has accomplished an Olympic feat: He has managed to make the subject of Ancient Greece both popular and controversial.His award-winning history "Black Athena" presents evidence that Greek civilization -- long acknowledged as the foundation of European culture -- owes more to African and Semitic ancestry than to Aryan roots. It claims that the scholarship of the past 150 years has ignored available evidence about the past because of various cultural inhibitions.
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NEWS
December 5, 2012
It is amusing and ironic that pop singer Adam Levine should be talking about "the decay of Western civilization" (Celebrities, Dec. 4). He is himself an icon of what journalist Carl Bernstein once described as "the idiot culture. " For the first time in our history, the weird, the stupid and the coarse are becoming not just the norm but our cultural ideal. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson
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By Stephen O'Shea and Stephen O'Shea,Los Angeles Times | April 5, 2009
The House of Wisdom By Jonathan Lyons Bloomsbury / 272 pages / $26 Dust will never gather on Jonathan Lyons' lively new book of medieval history - the opening page of his The House of Wisdom cites a cleric scandalized by the Crusader ladies of Antioch and their penchant for the plunging neckline and the bejeweled merkin. If this is the Middle Ages, thinks the reader, bring it on! But this pleasure gradually gives way to another beguilement, to be found in Lyons' subtitle: "How the Arabs Transformed Western Civilization."
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By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
A controversial student group at Towson University has again drawn criticism from other students who claim it is racist. But school administrators say they won't be taking any action against the group. On Saturday night, the group, Youth for Western Civilization, chalked messages that included the words "White Pride" at several visible locations on campus, including the Student Union and Freedom Square, said its president, Matthew Heimbach. When discovered Monday, the messages angered other student groups, who saw them as having nationalist connotations.
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By Linda Lowe Morris | March 3, 1991
There's a lot of heart at the Syrumie Cafe. You can see it on the walls.AOne whole side of the restaurant -- the right side as you come in the door -- is covered with a huge map in relief of the Middle East -- not the Middle East we see every minute these days on television, but as it was 3,000 years ago, when it truly cradled what we know as our Western civilization.There are no lines dividing countries here, only names: Greece on the far left, then Cyprus, down to Minoa, then Egypt, then Canaan . . . Mesopotamia, Babylonia, Persia, Media . . . over to Urartu on the far right.
NEWS
December 5, 2012
It is amusing and ironic that pop singer Adam Levine should be talking about "the decay of Western civilization" (Celebrities, Dec. 4). He is himself an icon of what journalist Carl Bernstein once described as "the idiot culture. " For the first time in our history, the weird, the stupid and the coarse are becoming not just the norm but our cultural ideal. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson
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By Los Angeles Times | March 15, 1995
BOSTON -- In a highly unusual gesture in an era when even prestigious Ivy League institutions are counting pennies, Yale University said yesterday it would return a $20 million gift to Texas financier and Yale alumnus Lee M. Bass.The announcement followed a series of articles in the Wall Street Journal capped by a scathing editorial yesterday that lambasted the Connecticut university for failing to implement a Western civilization curriculum mandated in the 1991 donation from Mr. Bass, a 1979 Yale graduate.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 28, 2001
A declaration by the Italian prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi, that Western civilization is superior to the culture of the Islamic world drew a furious outcry yesterday in Italy, Europe and beyond. The West, given the superiority of its values, "is bound to occidentalize and conquer new people," he said Wednesday in Berlin. "It has done it with the communist world and part of the Islamic world, but unfortunately, a part of the Islamic world is 1,400 years behind. From this point of view, we must be conscious of the strength and force of our civilization," he said.
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By Jonathan Lear | March 23, 1995
THE ENTIRE drama of Lee Bass' generous $20 million gift to Yale for a program in Western civilization, Yale's administrative fumble, Mr. Bass' subsequent request that the money be returned and Yale's accession to that request is a drama poorly understood.As one who believes that the great works of Western literature, philosophy, history and art are among the most wonderful things humans have ever created, I think that a truly distinctive program in Western civilization would have been a genuine contribution.
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By THOMAS V. DiBACCO | February 12, 1995
The Smithsonian Institution's decision to scrap much of the Enola Gay exhibit should teach Americans that controversy is the inherent price of rewriting history.Rather than adhere to the original plan of providing viewers with a 10,000-square-foot exhibit and a 600-page script that, in part, was critical of American decisions, museum officials decided to present only the fuselage of the famous plane.History will be limited to a small plaque delineating essential facts of the bombing.For years the prevalent interpretation of President Harry S. Truman's decision to use atomic weaponry was that it was the only alternative.
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By Stephen O'Shea and Stephen O'Shea,Los Angeles Times | April 5, 2009
The House of Wisdom By Jonathan Lyons Bloomsbury / 272 pages / $26 Dust will never gather on Jonathan Lyons' lively new book of medieval history - the opening page of his The House of Wisdom cites a cleric scandalized by the Crusader ladies of Antioch and their penchant for the plunging neckline and the bejeweled merkin. If this is the Middle Ages, thinks the reader, bring it on! But this pleasure gradually gives way to another beguilement, to be found in Lyons' subtitle: "How the Arabs Transformed Western Civilization."
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By Steven K. Wisensale | July 18, 2005
ANTHROPOLOGIST Joseph Campbell once provided us with a wonderfully concise history of Western civilization. In the early years, he said, the church steeple was the tallest structure in the community because religion mattered most. As government grew in size and importance, the steeple was dwarfed by the capital dome or the town hall tower. More recently, both the steeple and the dome have been dwarfed by the corporate skyscraper as business has become the driving force in Western civilization.
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By R. K. Ramazani | April 19, 2005
LET US HOPE that the successor to Pope John Paul II, the first pope in history to step inside a mosque, will continue his unprecedented policy of talking to the Muslim world. Muslim leaders who expressed sympathy after his death did not do so simply because the pope opposed the invasion of Iraq or spoke out against the wall of separation in the Israeli-occupied territories. They did so because the pope believed firmly that Christianity should engage in a dialogue with Islam. Western and Middle Eastern cultures have been in contact since ancient times.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2004
Walther Kirchner, who taught European, Russian and Baltic history and was the author of several textbooks, died of cancer Wednesday at Roland Park Place, where he had lived for 20 years. He was 99. He taught at the University of Delaware for a quarter-century and in later years held its H. Rodney Sharp chair in history. He moved to Baltimore and continued his research at the Johns Hopkins University and the Enoch Pratt Free Library. Born in Berlin, he was a graduate of Franzosisches Gymnasium in Berlin and sailed in 1926 to New York, where his family wanted him to gain business experience.
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By Michael Pakenham | April 14, 2002
The Extraordinary Voyage of Pytheas the Greek, by Barry Cunliffe (Walker and Co., 192 pages, $24). Setting out from the Greek city now known as Marseille, in the year 330 B.C., the explorer Pytheas traveled to the coasts of France and Denmark and then to the British isles, perhaps getting as far as Ireland and even Iceland -- making him, by most judgments, the first literate person to get to those areas that were unknown and feared by the civilizations on...
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By Michael Pakenham | December 23, 2001
We are living in a moment of intense concern about the events of Sept. 11 and what they portend. Is it decent to stop now and care about the delicate differences in social attitudes of a century, two centuries past? Yes. Decent, and valuable, quite possibly immensely instructive -- as the United States and much of the rest of the Western industrial world hover on the edge of cultural evolution that in some important manifestations can be seen as parallel to the Victorian era. Many of us feel we know a good deal about the people, the times, that are commonly called Victorian.
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By Michael Pakenham | April 14, 2002
The Extraordinary Voyage of Pytheas the Greek, by Barry Cunliffe (Walker and Co., 192 pages, $24). Setting out from the Greek city now known as Marseille, in the year 330 B.C., the explorer Pytheas traveled to the coasts of France and Denmark and then to the British isles, perhaps getting as far as Ireland and even Iceland -- making him, by most judgments, the first literate person to get to those areas that were unknown and feared by the civilizations on...
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By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | December 4, 1991
With books in one hand and cans of corn, beans and soup in the other, 25-year-old Eun Kang was ready for class.Bringing canned goods to feed poor county residents will mean an open book final exam for Kang and her 37 Western Civilization classmates at Anne Arundel CountyCommunity College.With class discussions yesterday focusing on the 14th-century bubonic plague in Europe, teacher RitaVictoria Gomez has repeatedly tried to make classwork relevant. Students at the college are encouraged to extend their classroom to the community.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 28, 2001
A declaration by the Italian prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi, that Western civilization is superior to the culture of the Islamic world drew a furious outcry yesterday in Italy, Europe and beyond. The West, given the superiority of its values, "is bound to occidentalize and conquer new people," he said Wednesday in Berlin. "It has done it with the communist world and part of the Islamic world, but unfortunately, a part of the Islamic world is 1,400 years behind. From this point of view, we must be conscious of the strength and force of our civilization," he said.
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