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By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 7, 2000
"MY INTEREST in art developed from my interest in history," said Tom Dawson, owner of a popular Annapolis gallery that specializes in 19th-century American art. He will exhibit both those interests in a talk at the Mitchell Gallery at St. John's College at 4 p.m. tomorrow. "It will be a dialogue between myself and Jay Phelan discussing the themes of his collection of Western art on display there." The term "Western art," Dawson explained, conjures up images of cowboys and Indians. The Phelan collection shows other aspects of the West, however.
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October 11, 2011
Collaboration between McDaniel professor Sue Bloom, Westminster physician Dr. Dean Griffin and McDaniel College will bring a special talk on the western art of E. William Gollings to the college's Peterson Hall on Thursday, Oct. 13, at 7 p.m. The premier authority on Gollings' work, Dr. William Ward, will speak. The event is free and open to all. "The lecturer is a friend of mine from Wyoming," said Griffin said in an email interview. "Last year I traveled to Wyoming to hear him give this lecture to a group from the Cowboy Hall of Fame Museum in Oklahoma City.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2003
The Grinch gets the rap for stealing Christmas, but what about Charles Dickens? A well-meaning heist, surely, but just the same. The manger and Bethlehem and anything to do with the region where the celebrated event actually occurred has long been overshadowed by A Christmas Carol's luscious steam of plum pudding, goose, candied fruit, chestnuts, mince pies, punch ... You could go on this way for some time before you got to, say, tabbouleh or chickpeas....
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 27, 2006
Richard Wagner's Ring of the Nibelung - about 15 hours of music and drama, divided into four chapters - remains not just a pinnacle of Western art, but a continual source of fresh inspiration. Hardly frozen in a world of ancient myth, the Ring cycle has the curious ability to speak in different ways to different people at different times in different places. It's a living thing, which makes it all the more magnetic. WNO's `Das Rheingold' 7:30 p.m. Thursday and five more performances through April 10 at Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues N.W. Tickets $45 to $190 (higher for box seats)
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 27, 2006
Richard Wagner's Ring of the Nibelung - about 15 hours of music and drama, divided into four chapters - remains not just a pinnacle of Western art, but a continual source of fresh inspiration. Hardly frozen in a world of ancient myth, the Ring cycle has the curious ability to speak in different ways to different people at different times in different places. It's a living thing, which makes it all the more magnetic. WNO's `Das Rheingold' 7:30 p.m. Thursday and five more performances through April 10 at Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues N.W. Tickets $45 to $190 (higher for box seats)
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | June 22, 1997
ROBERT Colescott's art is such a powerful indictment of white racism that for years the NAACP picketed his exhibitions -- and the museums that showed them -- as blatantly racist.The paradox is: Colescott is black. Yet many black people, not knowing this, thought that his paintings were outrageous and offensive. That some African-Americans are still offended even after they realize Colescott's race only shows how ghastly our American dilemma truly is.Actually Colescott, the only American to represent the United States in the prestigious Venice Biennale this year, has made a career of spoofing the myth of white superiority.
FEATURES
By Arthur B. Hirsch and Arthur B. Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
No shots are fired in anger or scalps taken in Arthur J. Phelan Jr.'s Old West. Buffalo are not hunted to near extinction; neither the frontier's westward advance nor its blue-eyed pioneers are celebrated as heroic. Phelan, raised and still living in Montgomery County, has his Old West, as Hollywood has its versions, as the National Museum of American Art's curators had theirs. For 30 years Phelan has been hunting paintings, drawings and photographs of what one authority on the subject called "a moving target": the American West.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2000
From the prairie, to the Rockies and Sierras, to the Pacific, the American West has captured our imagination as no other region of our vast and beautiful country. That point will prove hard to escape when you take in "The Phelan Collection of Western Art," which is on display at the Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis. The collection of 50 paintings, prints, drawings and photographs from the 19th century revolves around three main themes: scenic splendor, Western settlement and Manifest Destiny's human side.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 20, 2001
The Western eye can easily become lost in the vast panorama of Indian art. We don't recognize the signposts, as it were, of the Buddhist and Hindu inner world views. In the art of the West, these signposts are familiar from daily experience, from books and pictures, and from our knowledge of history, especially the history of Western art. But in the Buddhist and Hindu art of South Asia there is no such easy familiarity. We have to learn anew all the personages represented in this art, their attributes and powers and the stories they embody.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
As a student at Washington's H.D. Woodson High School, her teachers made sure that Sandy Bellamy learned all about the black artists, writers and performers who have contributed so much to Western culture - even if many academic textbooks and curricula ignore them. Much of her professional life has been spent ensuring other children gain a similar awareness of the diversity of our culture - a job that should become much easier, given yesterday's announcement that she has been named executive director of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 13, 2005
Reeling in fright and horror under the claws of a raging lion that has leapt onto its back, a white stallion with flowing mane and tail twists and turns in a frantic attempt to escape. The horse's large, luminous eyes already sense impending doom, yet the flared nostrils and bared teeth attest to a powerful will to fight and survive. Every muscle is taut, every movement seemingly animated by instinct. The entire scene is a desperate frieze of arrested motion. Whatever you think about horse paintings, this picture, intended to represent the overpowering emotions of awe and wonder that the 18th century called the sublime, will convince you that George Stubbs (1724-1806)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
As a student at Washington's H.D. Woodson High School, her teachers made sure that Sandy Bellamy learned all about the black artists, writers and performers who have contributed so much to Western culture - even if many academic textbooks and curricula ignore them. Much of her professional life has been spent ensuring other children gain a similar awareness of the diversity of our culture - a job that should become much easier, given yesterday's announcement that she has been named executive director of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2003
The Grinch gets the rap for stealing Christmas, but what about Charles Dickens? A well-meaning heist, surely, but just the same. The manger and Bethlehem and anything to do with the region where the celebrated event actually occurred has long been overshadowed by A Christmas Carol's luscious steam of plum pudding, goose, candied fruit, chestnuts, mince pies, punch ... You could go on this way for some time before you got to, say, tabbouleh or chickpeas....
TRAVEL
By Hal Smith and Hal Smith,Special to the Sun | April 6, 2003
It's been 15 years since a major Eastern museum has devoted a show to Frederic Remington, America's best-known sculptor, illustrator and painter of the frontier. So for anyone with a passion for American or Western art, the hot ticket this spring will be the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Opening next Sunday, The Color of Night will be the first exhibit devoted entirely to Remington's nocturnes, or night paintings, which are causing art historians to reassess his stature. From 1900 until his death in 1909, Remington produced at least 72 canvases in which he explored the difficulties of painting darkness.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 20, 2001
The Western eye can easily become lost in the vast panorama of Indian art. We don't recognize the signposts, as it were, of the Buddhist and Hindu inner world views. In the art of the West, these signposts are familiar from daily experience, from books and pictures, and from our knowledge of history, especially the history of Western art. But in the Buddhist and Hindu art of South Asia there is no such easy familiarity. We have to learn anew all the personages represented in this art, their attributes and powers and the stories they embody.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 2, 2001
In a famous 1966 essay entitled "Against Interpretation," the writer Susan Sontag complained that most art criticism "amounts to a philistine refusal to leave the work of art alone." She argued: "Real art has the capacity to make us nervous. By reducing the work of art to its content and then interpreting that, one tames the work of art. Interpretation makes art manageable, conformable." Since then, artists have adopted all kinds of strategies to avoid the burdens of the kind of criticism that seeks not only to explain works of art, but to explain them away.
TRAVEL
By Hal Smith and Hal Smith,Special to the Sun | April 6, 2003
It's been 15 years since a major Eastern museum has devoted a show to Frederic Remington, America's best-known sculptor, illustrator and painter of the frontier. So for anyone with a passion for American or Western art, the hot ticket this spring will be the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Opening next Sunday, The Color of Night will be the first exhibit devoted entirely to Remington's nocturnes, or night paintings, which are causing art historians to reassess his stature. From 1900 until his death in 1909, Remington produced at least 72 canvases in which he explored the difficulties of painting darkness.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | February 1, 1998
THE QUILTS OF Elizabeth Talford Scott, on display at the Maryland Institute, College of Art through March 1, are an apt metaphor for the artistic contributions of African-Americans that are being celebrated this Black History Month.Scott's richly patterned quilts, which record bits of family history, folklore and Bible stories, are made up of hundreds of individual pieces painstakingly stitched together to commemorate the passage of time and the power of tradition.Like the subjects of Scott's quilts, the artistic contributions of African- Americans are, as the scholar W. E. B. DuBois once noted, woven "into the very warp and woof of this nation."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | September 3, 2000
PARIS -- At the Louvre, you could always peruse galleries of Old Master paintings. You could pause on the grand marble staircase crowned by the Winged Victory of Samothrace, or join the crowd in front of the Mona Lisa. Now, for the first time, you can also view masterworks of African art. A 15th-century bronze sculpture from the ancient kingdom of Benin, for example, or a 19th-century wooden mask of the Baga people. They are part of a new exhibition of more than 100 objects from Africa, Asia, the Americas and Oceania -- an exhibition that marks the first long-term display of what, in this bastion of Western Art, has been referred to as "primitive art."
FEATURES
By Arthur B. Hirsch and Arthur B. Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
No shots are fired in anger or scalps taken in Arthur J. Phelan Jr.'s Old West. Buffalo are not hunted to near extinction; neither the frontier's westward advance nor its blue-eyed pioneers are celebrated as heroic. Phelan, raised and still living in Montgomery County, has his Old West, as Hollywood has its versions, as the National Museum of American Art's curators had theirs. For 30 years Phelan has been hunting paintings, drawings and photographs of what one authority on the subject called "a moving target": the American West.
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