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By Michael Vitez and Michael Vitez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 3, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - For years, Ann Marie Gore cleaned the toilets and polished the pews of an old stone church in West Philadelphia. She was the janitor. Now she is the pastor. And the administrator of a 60-child day-care center at the church. And the founder of a soup kitchen. Twice a week she cooks lunch in the church basement for 100 people. Ann Marie Gore has blossomed from a janitor into a custodian, in the grandest sense of the word. "Any way you can, come see Miss Ann," said Michael Newsuan, 52, a self-described alcoholic and Vietnam veteran who stood in line one recent Thursday for his plate of ribs, greens, rice, and yellow cake with chocolate icing.
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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2013
As warm afternoons give way to cool, crisp evenings, cities awaken from their summer nap, abuzz with new openings, performances and cultural events. Vibrantly hued country roads become stamping grounds for food festivals, wine tours and leaf peepers. Rather than retreat to the sofa when it's time to put away the hammock, check out these fall getaway itineraries. They are all within a few hours' drive from Baltimore. Festive fall cities Philadelphia This city, filled with historic sites, also offers world-renowned arts venues and cultural communities.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 8, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - It's one of the showpieces of the city, a 24-year-old tradition designed to "recognize and celebrate Philadelphia's ethnic pluralism and tolerance [and] its historic role as a port of entry welcoming immigrants to the United States." But to the 800 Eritreans who live in the city, the International Flag Display on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway has made them feel unwelcome. For the past five years, two years after the nation declared its independence, the local Eritrean community has lobbied unsuccessfully to add its red, green and blue flag to the 89 banners included in the array.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | November 5, 2008
PHILADELPHIA - Despite a last-minute frenzy for Pennsylvania's electoral plenty, John McCain failed to switch this traditionally blue state, which awarded its 21 votes to Barack Obama and helped him win the presidency. Polls closed at 8 p.m. and, moments later, based on exit poll data, NBC called the state for Obama. Other news organizations followed within an hour. Although Pennsylvania has not voted for a Republican presidential candidate in 20 years, it was seen by many political analysts - and the McCain campaign - as a potential Election Day surprise.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | May 5, 1992
Philadelphia. -- It's not just unseemly, says the University of Pennsylvania's vice dean, Ira Harkavy, for universities located in inner cities to ignore the chaos at their doorsteps, ''to be islands of affluence in seas of poverty, oases in deserts of despair.''The dereliction goes farther, he says: It is a betrayal of the optimistic 18th- and 19th-century missions of American universities -- not simply to advance learning, but to create a new and better society.Dr. Harkavy has University of Pennsylvania professors and instructors, graduate students and undergraduates involved in outreach to some of West Philadelphia's most ravaged neighborhoods and troubled schools.
SPORTS
By Mike Jensen and Mike Jensen,Knight-Ridder | September 1, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- The phone in Mary Eaddy's West Philadelphia rowhouse rang a marathon Friday. Her daughters called. Cousins called. Nieces called. Old friends called. The deacon at her Baptist church called.Everybody wanted to talk, or just scream. The first blast came shortly before 8 a.m., when Eaddy's daughter broke the news that Mike Powell, Eaddy's grandson, had shattered one of the untouchable records in sports.Powell had jumped 29 feet, 4 1/2 inches at the World Track and Field Championships in Tokyo, breaking Bob Beamon's world record, set at the 1968 Olympics.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | January 15, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Virthel Jones, a small, wiry 81-year-old resident of West Philadelphia, was sweeping her porch when a man came up, asking for help. He said he had a toothache and asked her for aspirin.She told him to wait on the porch. He didn't. He followed her into the house. He would regret that decision yesterday.After taking the pills, the man left.That's when she noticed that her pocketbook was gone.Jones, who is barely 5 feet tall, chased the man as he hustled down the street. "I said to him, 'Hey, I forgot to tell you something.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1997
PHILADELPHIA - Philadelphia has opened the first in a chain of soup kitchens that provide meals exclusively to children."There are children not being fed regularly," said Kellie Bowker, Greater Philadelphia Food Bank outreach coordinator, who helped organize the after-school dinner program for children ages 6 through 10. The first kitchen will be in the Cookman United Methodist Church."
NEWS
By Elisa Ung and Elisa Ung,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 17, 2001
PHILADELPHIA -- Nearly all of the 250,000 trees that line Philadelphia streets have a story or two. There's the branch that slammed into the hood of a brand-new car in Olney. The limb that took a chunk out of a Victorian porch in West Philadelphia. The dying maple that Germantown neighbors named "The Tree of Damocles" after the mythical sword that was always ready to fall. When the city begins a program to eliminate the backlog of thousands of sick and dead street trees in July, it will begin to overhaul a system that has been woefully underfunded and, in some cases, fatal.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | November 5, 2008
PHILADELPHIA - Despite a last-minute frenzy for Pennsylvania's electoral plenty, John McCain failed to switch this traditionally blue state, which awarded its 21 votes to Barack Obama and helped him win the presidency. Polls closed at 8 p.m. and, moments later, based on exit poll data, NBC called the state for Obama. Other news organizations followed within an hour. Although Pennsylvania has not voted for a Republican presidential candidate in 20 years, it was seen by many political analysts - and the McCain campaign - as a potential Election Day surprise.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | October 22, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- Raymond McCray showed up, bringing along four teenage relatives and his 5- and 8-year-old sons. The 29-year-old North Philadelphian had told his boys, "Y'all going out with Daddy today, for a good cause." Torrence Trayham, 25, showed up with 20 members of the youth congregation from Prayer Chapel Church of Christ in Upper Darby, Pa. "We got permission from our pastor to take the day off from church for this," he said. And 44-year-old Will Col- quitt, who lives in Burlington, N.J., showed up because he has elderly relatives in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Michael Vitez and Michael Vitez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 3, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - For years, Ann Marie Gore cleaned the toilets and polished the pews of an old stone church in West Philadelphia. She was the janitor. Now she is the pastor. And the administrator of a 60-child day-care center at the church. And the founder of a soup kitchen. Twice a week she cooks lunch in the church basement for 100 people. Ann Marie Gore has blossomed from a janitor into a custodian, in the grandest sense of the word. "Any way you can, come see Miss Ann," said Michael Newsuan, 52, a self-described alcoholic and Vietnam veteran who stood in line one recent Thursday for his plate of ribs, greens, rice, and yellow cake with chocolate icing.
NEWS
By Elisa Ung and Elisa Ung,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 17, 2001
PHILADELPHIA -- Nearly all of the 250,000 trees that line Philadelphia streets have a story or two. There's the branch that slammed into the hood of a brand-new car in Olney. The limb that took a chunk out of a Victorian porch in West Philadelphia. The dying maple that Germantown neighbors named "The Tree of Damocles" after the mythical sword that was always ready to fall. When the city begins a program to eliminate the backlog of thousands of sick and dead street trees in July, it will begin to overhaul a system that has been woefully underfunded and, in some cases, fatal.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 8, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - It's one of the showpieces of the city, a 24-year-old tradition designed to "recognize and celebrate Philadelphia's ethnic pluralism and tolerance [and] its historic role as a port of entry welcoming immigrants to the United States." But to the 800 Eritreans who live in the city, the International Flag Display on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway has made them feel unwelcome. For the past five years, two years after the nation declared its independence, the local Eritrean community has lobbied unsuccessfully to add its red, green and blue flag to the 89 banners included in the array.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1997
PHILADELPHIA - Philadelphia has opened the first in a chain of soup kitchens that provide meals exclusively to children."There are children not being fed regularly," said Kellie Bowker, Greater Philadelphia Food Bank outreach coordinator, who helped organize the after-school dinner program for children ages 6 through 10. The first kitchen will be in the Cookman United Methodist Church."
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | May 5, 1992
Philadelphia. -- It's not just unseemly, says the University of Pennsylvania's vice dean, Ira Harkavy, for universities located in inner cities to ignore the chaos at their doorsteps, ''to be islands of affluence in seas of poverty, oases in deserts of despair.''The dereliction goes farther, he says: It is a betrayal of the optimistic 18th- and 19th-century missions of American universities -- not simply to advance learning, but to create a new and better society.Dr. Harkavy has University of Pennsylvania professors and instructors, graduate students and undergraduates involved in outreach to some of West Philadelphia's most ravaged neighborhoods and troubled schools.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | October 22, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- Raymond McCray showed up, bringing along four teenage relatives and his 5- and 8-year-old sons. The 29-year-old North Philadelphian had told his boys, "Y'all going out with Daddy today, for a good cause." Torrence Trayham, 25, showed up with 20 members of the youth congregation from Prayer Chapel Church of Christ in Upper Darby, Pa. "We got permission from our pastor to take the day off from church for this," he said. And 44-year-old Will Col- quitt, who lives in Burlington, N.J., showed up because he has elderly relatives in West Philadelphia.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2013
As warm afternoons give way to cool, crisp evenings, cities awaken from their summer nap, abuzz with new openings, performances and cultural events. Vibrantly hued country roads become stamping grounds for food festivals, wine tours and leaf peepers. Rather than retreat to the sofa when it's time to put away the hammock, check out these fall getaway itineraries. They are all within a few hours' drive from Baltimore. Festive fall cities Philadelphia This city, filled with historic sites, also offers world-renowned arts venues and cultural communities.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | January 15, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Virthel Jones, a small, wiry 81-year-old resident of West Philadelphia, was sweeping her porch when a man came up, asking for help. He said he had a toothache and asked her for aspirin.She told him to wait on the porch. He didn't. He followed her into the house. He would regret that decision yesterday.After taking the pills, the man left.That's when she noticed that her pocketbook was gone.Jones, who is barely 5 feet tall, chased the man as he hustled down the street. "I said to him, 'Hey, I forgot to tell you something.
SPORTS
By Mike Jensen and Mike Jensen,Knight-Ridder | September 1, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- The phone in Mary Eaddy's West Philadelphia rowhouse rang a marathon Friday. Her daughters called. Cousins called. Nieces called. Old friends called. The deacon at her Baptist church called.Everybody wanted to talk, or just scream. The first blast came shortly before 8 a.m., when Eaddy's daughter broke the news that Mike Powell, Eaddy's grandson, had shattered one of the untouchable records in sports.Powell had jumped 29 feet, 4 1/2 inches at the World Track and Field Championships in Tokyo, breaking Bob Beamon's world record, set at the 1968 Olympics.
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