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West Nile Virus

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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 10, 2012
An adult in Central Maryland has been diagnosed with this year's first case of West Nile Virus, according to The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The virus was also detected in a pool of mosquitoes collected in Montgomery County by the U.S. Department of Defense. Most people with West Nile virus do not show symptoms. Those who do will have a fever, headache, body aches, skin rash and swollen lymph glands 3 to 15 days after a bite by an infected mosquito.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State health officials reported Thursday they have confirmed the first case of West Nile Virus in Maryland for the year. The infected adult lives in the suburbs of Washington. The virus has also been detected in a Washington-area horse, and in special mosquito traps placed in Harford, Montgomery, Prince George's and Talbot counties. Officials at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the human case was not unexpected - there were 16 reported cases last year. But they reminded people to take precautions by avoiding areas where mosquitoes are prevalent, covering their skin with clothes and hats, using insect repellent, and if possible, avoiding outdoor activities during mosquitoes' most active times at dusk and dawn.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State health officials reported Thursday they have confirmed the first case of West Nile Virus in Maryland for the year. The infected adult lives in the suburbs of Washington. The virus has also been detected in a Washington-area horse, and in special mosquito traps placed in Harford, Montgomery, Prince George's and Talbot counties. Officials at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the human case was not unexpected - there were 16 reported cases last year. But they reminded people to take precautions by avoiding areas where mosquitoes are prevalent, covering their skin with clothes and hats, using insect repellent, and if possible, avoiding outdoor activities during mosquitoes' most active times at dusk and dawn.
NEWS
September 27, 2013
National recovery month The Department of Health is joining with community groups and providers in a program to support a healthy lifestyle for people in long-term recovery from mental and substance use disorders. The department's recovery support services programs provide peer support, care coordination and recovery centers. Information: 410-222-7164 or follow @AAC_Recovery on Twitter. Health fair Baltimore Washington Medical Center will sponsor a health fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4 in the food court at Arundel Mills, 7000 Arundel Mills Circle, Hanover.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
Sharon Taylor is a Maryland public health lab technician whose job it is to pluck the brains from dead crows. Her work isn't pretty, but it's a vital part of the state's defensive mobilization against the deadly West Nile virus that killed seven people in New York City last year. The birds' brains are harvested daily in the basement of a Baltimore state office building. Later they're ground up and tested for infection by the West Nile virus. Nearby, state health department workers are also grinding batches of mosquitoes for testing, and processing the blood drawn from Maryland's flock of early-warning "sentinel" chickens.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker | August 16, 2012
A second person in Maryland has been diagnosed with West Nile Virus this year, according to state health officials. The state doesn't identify victims of the disease, but said the diagnosis was in the Washington suburbs, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. This year's first case of West Nile Virus was diagnosed in an adult male in Central Maryland The viruswas also detected in a pool of mosquitoes collected in Montgomery Countyby theU.S. Department of Defense.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 1, 1999
Vote tomorrow. Preferably in Baltimore, even if Philadelphia has the contest.A Bush in the bush is a shoo-in. If he can avoid debates, unscripted appearances, confrontations and issues entirely, no one else would stand a chance.The economy confuses itself with Ol' Man River and just goes rollin'. Must be Bill.West Nile virus, stay away from our door.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Pikesville and Catonsville are the next area locations to be sprayed for mosquitoes in response to cases of West Nile Virus, Baltimore County Department of Health officials said Friday. The Maryland Department of Agriculture will spray parts of Pikesville Sept. 18 and parts of Catonsville Sept. 19. Officials recommend residents and their pets stay inside during the spraying, after 7:30 p.m., of Biomist 30-30, though the active ingredient permethrin is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
EXPLORE
Staff Reports | September 17, 2012
Baltimore County is conducting mosquito sprayings this week in Catonsville and next week in Pikesville in the wake of two human cases of West Nile Virus being discovered in the county. Weather permitting, sprayings are scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 19, in parts of Catonsville (click for map); and Mondays, Sept. 24 and Oct. 1, in parts of Pikesville (click for map). Officials said spraying would take place after 7:30 p.m. and residents in those areas should stay indoors during spraying to minimize direct contact with the spray.
EXPLORE
August 2, 2011
Editor: After reading your recent article onbats reported at apartment complexes in Aberdeen, for the sake of balance in your paper as well as the ecosystem, please publish thatbats come with benefits too. Bats eat tons of mosquitos, preventing the spread of West Nile virus, malaria and other diseases to humans. Farmers would have to use more toxic pesticides on the crops we eat, if not for the consumption of agricultural pests by bats. A mysterious fungus called white nose syndrome has been wiping out whole bat colonies (and maybe species)
EXPLORE
Staff Reports | September 17, 2012
Baltimore County is conducting mosquito sprayings this week in Catonsville and next week in Pikesville in the wake of two human cases of West Nile Virus being discovered in the county. Weather permitting, sprayings are scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 19, in parts of Catonsville (click for map); and Mondays, Sept. 24 and Oct. 1, in parts of Pikesville (click for map). Officials said spraying would take place after 7:30 p.m. and residents in those areas should stay indoors during spraying to minimize direct contact with the spray.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 17, 2012
Spraying to control mosquitoes in Baltimore County's Pikesville neighborhoods has been postponed until next week, health officials said. The state Department of Agriculture will spray Sept. 24 and Oct. 1 in parts of Pikesville. Spraying in Catonsville will be Sept. 19 and 26.  Spraying will begin after 7:30 p.m. each evening.(More information and maps can be found at the county health department website .) Agriculture officials recommend residents and their pets stay inside as not to come in direct contact with the spray, Biomist 30-30.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Pikesville and Catonsville are the next area locations to be sprayed for mosquitoes in response to cases of West Nile Virus, Baltimore County Department of Health officials said Friday. The Maryland Department of Agriculture will spray parts of Pikesville Sept. 18 and parts of Catonsville Sept. 19. Officials recommend residents and their pets stay inside during the spraying, after 7:30 p.m., of Biomist 30-30, though the active ingredient permethrin is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties are getting sprayed for mosquitoes and health officials are warning residents to take precautions as the nation copes with the worst season of West Nile Virus since the disease was discovered in the United States in 1999. One person in Maryland has died from the disease this summer and 21 have contracted it, according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Nationally, the potentially fatal disease, spread by mosquitoes that pick it up from infected birds, has afflicted 1,993 people, according to the Centers for Disease Control.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 17, 2012
Spraying to control mosquitoes in Baltimore County's Pikesville neighborhoods has been postponed until next week, health officials said. The state Department of Agriculture will spray Sept. 24 and Oct. 1 in parts of Pikesville. Spraying in Catonsville will be Sept. 19 and 26.  Spraying will begin after 7:30 p.m. each evening.(More information and maps can be found at the county health department website .) Agriculture officials recommend residents and their pets stay inside as not to come in direct contact with the spray, Biomist 30-30.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Diana Sugg and Rafael Alvarez and Diana Sugg,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1999
A dead crow found in downtown Baltimore this month was infected with the West Nile virus that caused the death of seven people in and around New York City this summer, Maryland health officials said last night. The confirmation of the virus -- which is transmitted by mosquitoes and usually found in Africa -- was made yesterday by the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The infected bird was found Oct. 14 in the 300 block of E. Lombard St. The disease can be spread to humans only from the bite of an infected mosquito.
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