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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | June 5, 1999
From little baseball games do mighty cultural exchanges grow.Charm City's newfound buddy-buddy relationship with Fidel Castro's Cuba continues next week, as five representatives from Baltimore arts organizations leave Sunday for Havana to share things cultural with their Caribbean counterparts. The group will be attending the First International Culture and Development Congress, being held under the auspices of UNESCO and UNICEF.Those traveling to Cuba are Steven Baxter, dean of the Peabody Conservatory; Dennis Fiori, director of the Maryland Historical Society; Leslie King-Hammond, dean of graduate studies at the Maryland Institute, College of Art; Ted Rouse, chairman of the board of the American Visionary Arts Museum; and Steve Ziger, chairman of the board of the Contemporary Museum.
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FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | September 15, 1996
Antiques are not just beautiful objects to be admired. They often tell part of the story of how life was lived in the past.The sugar chest -- a large wooden box, sometimes on a floor-standing base -- was a popular furniture form in the Southern United States in the 18th and 19th centuries.It was an attractive piece of furniture often displayed in the dining room.Fancy desserts, which took time to make and used expensive ingredients, were featured at dinner parties. They gave added prestige to the party-giver.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 19, 1998
It's high time black America buried Willie Lynch. Let's bury him deep and bury him for good. Old Willie - or at least the speech he supposedly gave to Virginia slaveholders on the banks of the James River in 1712 - has been making the rounds in America's black community for years. Louis Farrakhan quoted extensively from Lynch's speech at the Million Man March in 1995. Lynch supposedly urged American slaveholders to use envy, fear and distrust to divide their slaves, the better to control them.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 2007
FORT-DE-FRANCE, MARTINIQUE // Strolling down the narrow, cobblestone streets of Fort-de-France, the nearly 400-year-old capital of the Caribbean island of Martinique, I wipe my brow in the midday heat and wonder whether I should interrupt my sightseeing for a cold, creamy glace -- French ice cream. As I make my way down rue Victor-Hugo, passing boutiques, cafes and shops in the lively shopping district, I spot two Martinican women in business suits, holding colorful parasols to shield the beaming sun. The ladies look cool, composed and tres chic, despite the soaring temperatures.
NEWS
February 22, 1998
Gentlemen, I greet you here on the bank of the James River in the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and twelve. First, I shall thank you, the gentlemen of the Colony of Virginia, for bringing me here. I am here to help you solve some of your problems with slaves. Your invitation reached me on my modest plantation in the West Indies where I have experimented with some of the newest and still oldest methods for control of slaves. Ancient Rome would envy us if my program is implemented.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
Mercedes Linton Shriver, an ardent environmentalist and an artist whose designer silk wraps are sold worldwide, died Wednesday of internal injuries after a fall down a cliff while hiking one of her favorite trails near her home in Saint-Barthelemy. She was 41 and had lived on the small Caribbean island in the French West Indies for about five years. Born in Baltimore and known as Merc, Ms. Shriver was a graduate of Maryvale Preparatory School and studied art later at a variety of places, including the Maryland Institute College of Art, the San Francisco Art Institute and the Telluride AhHa School.
NEWS
January 13, 2010
Local faith leaders call for immigration reform Several Baltimore-area faith leaders speaking at St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church on Tuesday called for immigration reform, a month after Congress introduced legislation addressing the topic. The Rev. Joe Muth of St. Matthew Roman Catholic Church on Loch Raven Boulevard said he opened an immigration center at his church 10 years ago. He said the center guides people through the legalization procedure and would like to see the federal government adopt a model that would expedite the naturalization process.
NEWS
October 24, 1992
"Yet do I marvel at this curious thing," the American poet Countee Cullen wrote in the 1920s, "to make a poet black and bid him sing!" For West Indian poet Derek Walcott, there was cause to rejoice this month when the Swedish academy awarded him the Nobel Prize for Literature.Mr. Walcott, who teaches writing and literature at Boston University, has been compared to the Greek poets of antiquity for his luminous language and majestic narratives. His poems both celebrate the rich cultural diversity of his native West Indies and evoke the darkness of colonialism, slavery and exile.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1994
A former Lutherville securities dealer pleaded guilty yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court to fraud and the sale of unregistered securities in several schemes, including a venture that was supposed to import latex gloves for resale in the battle against AIDS.Lee Paul Der, 52, formerly of the 13900 block of Mantua Mill Road in Glyndon was arrested in September in Hong Kong. He and a co-defendant were indicted a year ago, accused of bilking 10 clients of more than $768,000 in multiple counts of securities fraud, conspiracy, theft and other violations dating from 1987.
NEWS
July 30, 2006
Rise and fall of Joppa A land certificate dated July 28, 1661, shows 300 acres on the north side of the eastern branch of the Gunpowder River laid out for John Taylor, a planter. This tract, known as "Taylor's Choice," became the thriving town of Joppa. Joppa was destined to become the county seat of old Baltimore County from about 1710 or 1712 to 1768. According to The Story of Harford County, the original Joppa was a booming seaport, where ships from Europe and the West Indies brought manufactured goods and took away great quantities of tobacco and corn.
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