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By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Staff Writer | September 13, 1993
Eighty food and arts and crafts booths lined the main baseball field at Druid Hill Park yesterday, and music blared from a sound stage that eventually had five bands playing reggae, calypso soca-rama and steel-band music.It was the third and concluding day of Baltimore's 12th annual Caribbean Festival -- and the event's fifth appearance in Druid Hill Park, said coordinator Mark Kendal.Sept. 10-12 were designated "West Indian/Caribbean Days" by proclamation of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.Over the three days, the festival drew thousands.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | December 1, 2006
It's just another abandoned building for now, but with a little work, Dawn Samuels thinks it could be transformed into the ultimate hub of Park Heights' Caribbean community. Creating a cultural center would take money, time and cooperation from her fellow West Indian merchants along Park Heights Avenue -- a combination that has proven difficult in the past. But a new city plan for Park Heights has given Samuels hope that her long-held dream might get a jump-start. Last month, the Baltimore City Council approved its first city master plan in 35 years, including a 47-page vision for rejuvenating one of Baltimore's most depressed neighborhoods.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | December 1, 2006
It's just another abandoned building for now, but with a little work, Dawn Samuels thinks it could be transformed into the ultimate hub of Park Heights' Caribbean community. Creating a cultural center would take money, time and cooperation from her fellow West Indian merchants along Park Heights Avenue -- a combination that has proven difficult in the past. But a new city plan for Park Heights has given Samuels hope that her long-held dream might get a jump-start. Last month, the Baltimore City Council approved its first city master plan in 35 years, including a 47-page vision for rejuvenating one of Baltimore's most depressed neighborhoods.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 9, 2005
Into the West, cable channel TNT's 12-hour epic about life on the 19th-century frontier, is American mythology retold in the voice of multiculturalism. Re-imagining the national past is a tall order, but who better to take it on than Steven Spielberg, the filmmaker and producer who helped craft new narratives about World War II heroism (Band of Brothers) and the righteousness of some European gentiles during the Holocaust (Schindler's List)? Spielberg is the executive producer of this sprawling, panoramic miniseries about the collision of cultures that took place in the American Eden, west of the Mississippi.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 9, 2005
Into the West, cable channel TNT's 12-hour epic about life on the 19th-century frontier, is American mythology retold in the voice of multiculturalism. Re-imagining the national past is a tall order, but who better to take it on than Steven Spielberg, the filmmaker and producer who helped craft new narratives about World War II heroism (Band of Brothers) and the righteousness of some European gentiles during the Holocaust (Schindler's List)? Spielberg is the executive producer of this sprawling, panoramic miniseries about the collision of cultures that took place in the American Eden, west of the Mississippi.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2004
Sandy Edwards-Reed came in search of her roots. And she found them - at least symbolically - in the flag-embroidered bandanas she purchased from a vendor. The bright green one represented Dominica, her mother's home country, and the one emblazoned with a sun, surrounded by red and black, was for Antigua, where her father is from. "I try to stay connected," the Gwynn Oak resident said. "It's important to me to know where I came from." That expression of cultural pride was on display yesterday at the Baltimore Caribbean Carnival at Druid Hill Park.
FEATURES
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | October 6, 1993
"I knew the minute I saw the script that this movie was gonna make me big -- gigantic," Doug E. Doug said of his role in "Cool Runnings," a new comedy based on Jamaica's 1988 Olympic bobsledding team.Visiting Dallas recently with fellow player Rawle D. Lewis, Mr. Doug cited "Cool Runnings" as "the first film I've had that's treated me as any kind of priority. I've hung onto this project for three years -- that's how important it's been to me."Mr. Doug, who started out at age 17 in the 1980s as a touring comedian and opening act for such musical heavyweights as Miles Davis and the Isley Bros.
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen and Steven Raichlen,Contributing Writer | August 2, 1992
At the risk of sounding older than I really am, I remember the days before lime became chic, when fresh limes were hard to find and most cooks had to make do with the sour juice in a fruit-shaped squeeze bottle.That was before la nouvelle cuisine made lime the premier citrus fruit of the '80s. It was also before Perrier, with its inevitable wedge of lime, became the quaff of a nation. Few Northerners had ever tasted a Key lime. As for the perfumed kaffir lime from Thailand, it might as well have grown on the moon.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1994
Ronald DeAbreu, an associate professor at Anne Arundel Community College (AACC), learned a great deal about the writings of dead European men in his Catholic school in Guyana.But what really affected him was the handful of books he read by West Indian authors."As a child in Guyana, I read whatever West Indian novels I could get my hands on because of the delight I took in seeing depicted a world that was familiar to me," he said.One of the first books was an early novel by V. S. Naipaul called "The House of Mr. Biswas," a Dickensian comedy about a man from Trinidad who tries to build his own house.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Richard Nicolas' daughter was 2 years old, but they had never spent even a minute alone together. A Friday night outing at Golden Ring Mall would be the first time. He would take Aja to an 8 o'clock movie, "The Adventures of Pinocchio," and return her to her mother. At the last minute, when her mother wavered about letting her go, Aja was insistent."Want to see Pinocchio!" the toddler said. "Want to see Pinocchio!"They saw the movie, but that night, July 26, would be father and daughter's last together.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2004
Sandy Edwards-Reed came in search of her roots. And she found them - at least symbolically - in the flag-embroidered bandanas she purchased from a vendor. The bright green one represented Dominica, her mother's home country, and the one emblazoned with a sun, surrounded by red and black, was for Antigua, where her father is from. "I try to stay connected," the Gwynn Oak resident said. "It's important to me to know where I came from." That expression of cultural pride was on display yesterday at the Baltimore Caribbean Carnival at Druid Hill Park.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Staff Writer | September 13, 1993
Eighty food and arts and crafts booths lined the main baseball field at Druid Hill Park yesterday, and music blared from a sound stage that eventually had five bands playing reggae, calypso soca-rama and steel-band music.It was the third and concluding day of Baltimore's 12th annual Caribbean Festival -- and the event's fifth appearance in Druid Hill Park, said coordinator Mark Kendal.Sept. 10-12 were designated "West Indian/Caribbean Days" by proclamation of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.Over the three days, the festival drew thousands.
NEWS
July 13, 2003
Charles Herbert Thompson, a retired assistant superintendent of building maintenance for the city who also had a catering business featuring West Indian food, died Tuesday of an infection after surgery at Bon Secours Hospital. He was 74 and lived on Druid Park Lake Drive in Baltimore. A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Thompson joined the U.S. Navy in 1952 -- where he learned to cook -- and was honorably discharged in 1959. He later served in the merchant marines from 1966 until 1968, when he settled in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2010
Arnold Blumberg plops the zombie head on a table at the front of the small theater. "I brought a friend," says the University of Baltimore professor, clad in an unbuttoned black shirt adorned with red skulls. Blumberg is meeting his class for the first time and it seems appropriate that he greet them beside "old Worm Eye," undead star of the 1979 Italian cult film "Zombi 2. " It was Worm Eye's decaying visage that called to a young Blumberg from the shelf of a Randallstown video store in the 1980s.
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