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By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Staff Writer | September 13, 1993
Eighty food and arts and crafts booths lined the main baseball field at Druid Hill Park yesterday, and music blared from a sound stage that eventually had five bands playing reggae, calypso soca-rama and steel-band music.It was the third and concluding day of Baltimore's 12th annual Caribbean Festival -- and the event's fifth appearance in Druid Hill Park, said coordinator Mark Kendal.Sept. 10-12 were designated "West Indian/Caribbean Days" by proclamation of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.Over the three days, the festival drew thousands.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | December 1, 2006
It's just another abandoned building for now, but with a little work, Dawn Samuels thinks it could be transformed into the ultimate hub of Park Heights' Caribbean community. Creating a cultural center would take money, time and cooperation from her fellow West Indian merchants along Park Heights Avenue -- a combination that has proven difficult in the past. But a new city plan for Park Heights has given Samuels hope that her long-held dream might get a jump-start. Last month, the Baltimore City Council approved its first city master plan in 35 years, including a 47-page vision for rejuvenating one of Baltimore's most depressed neighborhoods.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | December 1, 2006
It's just another abandoned building for now, but with a little work, Dawn Samuels thinks it could be transformed into the ultimate hub of Park Heights' Caribbean community. Creating a cultural center would take money, time and cooperation from her fellow West Indian merchants along Park Heights Avenue -- a combination that has proven difficult in the past. But a new city plan for Park Heights has given Samuels hope that her long-held dream might get a jump-start. Last month, the Baltimore City Council approved its first city master plan in 35 years, including a 47-page vision for rejuvenating one of Baltimore's most depressed neighborhoods.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 9, 2005
Into the West, cable channel TNT's 12-hour epic about life on the 19th-century frontier, is American mythology retold in the voice of multiculturalism. Re-imagining the national past is a tall order, but who better to take it on than Steven Spielberg, the filmmaker and producer who helped craft new narratives about World War II heroism (Band of Brothers) and the righteousness of some European gentiles during the Holocaust (Schindler's List)? Spielberg is the executive producer of this sprawling, panoramic miniseries about the collision of cultures that took place in the American Eden, west of the Mississippi.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 9, 2005
Into the West, cable channel TNT's 12-hour epic about life on the 19th-century frontier, is American mythology retold in the voice of multiculturalism. Re-imagining the national past is a tall order, but who better to take it on than Steven Spielberg, the filmmaker and producer who helped craft new narratives about World War II heroism (Band of Brothers) and the righteousness of some European gentiles during the Holocaust (Schindler's List)? Spielberg is the executive producer of this sprawling, panoramic miniseries about the collision of cultures that took place in the American Eden, west of the Mississippi.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2004
Sandy Edwards-Reed came in search of her roots. And she found them - at least symbolically - in the flag-embroidered bandanas she purchased from a vendor. The bright green one represented Dominica, her mother's home country, and the one emblazoned with a sun, surrounded by red and black, was for Antigua, where her father is from. "I try to stay connected," the Gwynn Oak resident said. "It's important to me to know where I came from." That expression of cultural pride was on display yesterday at the Baltimore Caribbean Carnival at Druid Hill Park.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Richard Nicolas' daughter was 2 years old, but they had never spent even a minute alone together. A Friday night outing at Golden Ring Mall would be the first time. He would take Aja to an 8 o'clock movie, "The Adventures of Pinocchio," and return her to her mother. At the last minute, when her mother wavered about letting her go, Aja was insistent."Want to see Pinocchio!" the toddler said. "Want to see Pinocchio!"They saw the movie, but that night, July 26, would be father and daughter's last together.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1994
Ronald DeAbreu, an associate professor at Anne Arundel Community College (AACC), learned a great deal about the writings of dead European men in his Catholic school in Guyana.But what really affected him was the handful of books he read by West Indian authors."As a child in Guyana, I read whatever West Indian novels I could get my hands on because of the delight I took in seeing depicted a world that was familiar to me," he said.One of the first books was an early novel by V. S. Naipaul called "The House of Mr. Biswas," a Dickensian comedy about a man from Trinidad who tries to build his own house.
NEWS
July 13, 2003
Charles Herbert Thompson, a retired assistant superintendent of building maintenance for the city who also had a catering business featuring West Indian food, died Tuesday of an infection after surgery at Bon Secours Hospital. He was 74 and lived on Druid Park Lake Drive in Baltimore. A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Thompson joined the U.S. Navy in 1952 -- where he learned to cook -- and was honorably discharged in 1959. He later served in the merchant marines from 1966 until 1968, when he settled in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Edwin Feulner | December 15, 1992
IF black America's problems are due to anything other than discrimination, Bill Clinton's administration will have a hard time finding out about it.Why? Because the civil rights establishment is so fixated on discrimination that it reflexively attacks anyone who suggests there could be other reasons for the fact that blacks hold fewer professional jobs than whites, and for other such "evidence" of inequality.If you don't believe this, just ask Thomas Sowell.Mr. Sowell, a black scholar at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, has tried his best to explain that while discrimination exists in America, it does not entirely explain black underachievement -- and that the fixation on discrimination diverts our attention from other problems.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2004
Sandy Edwards-Reed came in search of her roots. And she found them - at least symbolically - in the flag-embroidered bandanas she purchased from a vendor. The bright green one represented Dominica, her mother's home country, and the one emblazoned with a sun, surrounded by red and black, was for Antigua, where her father is from. "I try to stay connected," the Gwynn Oak resident said. "It's important to me to know where I came from." That expression of cultural pride was on display yesterday at the Baltimore Caribbean Carnival at Druid Hill Park.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Staff Writer | September 13, 1993
Eighty food and arts and crafts booths lined the main baseball field at Druid Hill Park yesterday, and music blared from a sound stage that eventually had five bands playing reggae, calypso soca-rama and steel-band music.It was the third and concluding day of Baltimore's 12th annual Caribbean Festival -- and the event's fifth appearance in Druid Hill Park, said coordinator Mark Kendal.Sept. 10-12 were designated "West Indian/Caribbean Days" by proclamation of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.Over the three days, the festival drew thousands.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2004
COMING UP The American premiere of Elmina's Kitchen, a drama about the legacy of violence among three generations of British West Indian men, begins performances at Center Stage tomorrow. Commissioned by London's Royal National Theatre, where it made its debut in 2003, the play won its author, Kwame Kwei-Armah, the Evening Standard Award for Most Promising Playwright. Center Stage associate artist Marion McClinton directs a cast headed by Thomas Jefferson Byrd, Yvette Ganier, Leroy McClain and Curtis McClarin.
NEWS
July 5, 1995
DR. HENRY W. Foster Jr., the president's controversial nominee for surgeon general, ran afoul of the Senate's fabled filibuster rule recently. For those unfamiliar with the history of this parliamentary maneuver, here is some background, courtesy of the Washington Times:"Filibuster derives from the Dutch word 'vrijbuiter,' which means free booty, and the Spanish 'filibustero' -- West Indian pirates who used a small ship called the filibot."In the 1850s, the word began to be used to describe speeches in Congress used for disruptive purposes.
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