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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 14, 1995
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. -- A growing effort by Los Angeles-area cities to take the lead on gun control legislation will move ahead next week, when the West Hollywood City Council considers a law that would ban the sale of Saturday night specials.The restrictions on the cheap, small handguns would be the first of their kind in California and -- if they can survive expected legal challenges -- they could pave the way for similar proposals in other cities, including Los Angeles.Despairing at the state Legislature's reluctance to pass gun-control laws, several Los Angeles County cities in the past year have been moving incrementally in an effort to control gun violence.
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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 26, 2013
Last year, Baltimore's "Ace Of Cakes" star Duff Goldman added more layers to his rising confectionary empire, founding Charm City Cakes West and Duff's Cake Mix in Los Angeles. Strategically centered near the world's most prominent movie and television studios and the city's swankiest neighborhoods, Goldman caters to L.A. 's famously extravagant (and often half-baked) personalities, who relentlessly challenge him to take his cakes to the next tier. And when the Food Network's baking alchemist is not commuting coast to coast, he serves as a culinary ambassador for the American Chef Corps, a government initiative assembled to trade culinary techniques with chefs around the world.
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NEWS
April 12, 2006
Robert Ambrose Blaisdell, a retired electrician and railroad fan, died of a heart attack Thursday at his Arnold home. He was 80. Mr. Blaisdell was born and raised in Eastport and graduated from Annapolis High School. He served in the Navy at the end of World War II, according to family members. Mr. Blaisdell was a charter member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 24 in Baltimore, and worked for nearly 40 years until retiring in 1990. He was an avid collector of model trains -- in all gauges -- according to a stepson, Donald Cox of Columbia.
NEWS
April 12, 2006
Robert Ambrose Blaisdell, a retired electrician and railroad fan, died of a heart attack Thursday at his Arnold home. He was 80. Mr. Blaisdell was born and raised in Eastport and graduated from Annapolis High School. He served in the Navy at the end of World War II, according to family members. Mr. Blaisdell was a charter member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 24 in Baltimore, and worked for nearly 40 years until retiring in 1990. He was an avid collector of model trains -- in all gauges -- according to a stepson, Donald Cox of Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Margy Rochlin and Margy Rochlin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2004
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - Kirsten Dunst tells a story about the strangeness of fame. She was 12 and had landed what would be her breakthrough role as an aging woman in a child's body in Interview With the Vampire. At the time, she lived with her family near the Warner Brothers lot that is famous as a way station for stage parents and their child-star offspring and as a hotbed of competition. One day, Dunst recalled, a young girl approached her and bragged, "My agent says I'm going to be the next Kirsten Dunst."
FEATURES
October 22, 1992
WEST HOLLYWOOD -- Little Richard is proof that rock and roll will never die.The self-styled "Architect of Rock 'n' Roll" has had as many comebacks as hit singles.After such 1950s pop chart hits as "Good Golly, Miss Molly," "Lucille," and "Tutti Frutti," he drifted in and out of the rock scene while doing stints as a preacher, a gospel singer, a spokesman for various products and an actor.But he's back doing what he does best.Little Richard has plunged into the exploding kids' music market to make a hard-driving rock record for children, free from any coochy-coo phrases or melodies.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 26, 2013
Last year, Baltimore's "Ace Of Cakes" star Duff Goldman added more layers to his rising confectionary empire, founding Charm City Cakes West and Duff's Cake Mix in Los Angeles. Strategically centered near the world's most prominent movie and television studios and the city's swankiest neighborhoods, Goldman caters to L.A. 's famously extravagant (and often half-baked) personalities, who relentlessly challenge him to take his cakes to the next tier. And when the Food Network's baking alchemist is not commuting coast to coast, he serves as a culinary ambassador for the American Chef Corps, a government initiative assembled to trade culinary techniques with chefs around the world.
NEWS
May 25, 1998
Royce Kendall, 61, of the father-daughter country music duo the Kendalls, died Friday after collapsing at a concert site in Iowa. He and daughter Jeannie Kendall had several hits, including "Heaven's Just a Sin Away," "Thank God for the Radio" and "Sweet Desire."Robert W. Morgan, 60, a fixture on KRTH-FM and other Los Angeles radio stations for more than three decades, died Friday after a two-year battle with lung cancer.Ricardo Franco, 48, a director whose film "The Good Star" swept Spain's Goya Film Awards in January, died of a heart attack Thursday in Madrid.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | January 7, 2007
Once upon a time, there was Bette and Tina. And they were in love. They lived a sexy lesbian fairy tale in West Hollywood, surrounded by sexy art, sexy Mid Century furniture and sexy lesbian friends. Then Tina had a miscarriage, Bette went creeping with a carpenter named Candace and the creator of The L Word, Showtime's hit series about impossibly hot, impossibly well-off, impossibly libidinous lesbians, decided to really mess with our emotions. THE L WORD / / The fourth season makes its premiere tonight at 10 on Showtime.
NEWS
December 18, 2001
John Guedel, 88, who produced three of radio and television's most enduring programs - Art Linkletter's People Are Funny and House Party, and Groucho Marx's You Bet Your Life - died of heart failure Saturday at a hospital in West Hollywood, Calif. Mr. Guedel was originator of what might have been the first radio stunt game show with People are Funny, which moved from radio to television in 1954, and the first singing commercial on radio. Mr. Guedel created You Bet Your Life for Mr. Marx in 1947, including having a duck drop down and deliver a $100 bill whenever a contestant uttered the "secret word."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Margy Rochlin and Margy Rochlin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2004
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - Kirsten Dunst tells a story about the strangeness of fame. She was 12 and had landed what would be her breakthrough role as an aging woman in a child's body in Interview With the Vampire. At the time, she lived with her family near the Warner Brothers lot that is famous as a way station for stage parents and their child-star offspring and as a hotbed of competition. One day, Dunst recalled, a young girl approached her and bragged, "My agent says I'm going to be the next Kirsten Dunst."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 14, 1995
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. -- A growing effort by Los Angeles-area cities to take the lead on gun control legislation will move ahead next week, when the West Hollywood City Council considers a law that would ban the sale of Saturday night specials.The restrictions on the cheap, small handguns would be the first of their kind in California and -- if they can survive expected legal challenges -- they could pave the way for similar proposals in other cities, including Los Angeles.Despairing at the state Legislature's reluctance to pass gun-control laws, several Los Angeles County cities in the past year have been moving incrementally in an effort to control gun violence.
FEATURES
October 22, 1992
WEST HOLLYWOOD -- Little Richard is proof that rock and roll will never die.The self-styled "Architect of Rock 'n' Roll" has had as many comebacks as hit singles.After such 1950s pop chart hits as "Good Golly, Miss Molly," "Lucille," and "Tutti Frutti," he drifted in and out of the rock scene while doing stints as a preacher, a gospel singer, a spokesman for various products and an actor.But he's back doing what he does best.Little Richard has plunged into the exploding kids' music market to make a hard-driving rock record for children, free from any coochy-coo phrases or melodies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
Who knew, apparently references in Jonathan Franzen novels pay off. The 9:30 Club has been named one of America's most influential clubs by Billboard magazine. In an item published last week, the club was included alongside New York City's Bowery Room and West Hollywood's The Troubadour in a list of the ten most influential clubs in the country. The 9:30 Club, heavily name-checked in Franzen's "Freedom," is the "best-designed working club in the country," says one of the music vets quoted in the magazine.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 13, 1995
Paul Monette, 49, a writer whose autobiography, "Becoming a Man: Half a Life Story," a memoir of suppressing and then celebrating his homosexuality, won the 1992 National Book Award for nonfiction, died Friday at home in West Hollywood, Calif.A friend, said the cause was complications from AIDS.BMr. Monette said that writing the autobiography "literally kept me alive" after he contracted AIDS.He was born in Lawrence, Mass. In "Becoming a Man," he described growing up in a middle-class world in which he became obsessed with his homosexual yearnings but had to suppress them.
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