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NEWS
August 10, 1993
Cardinal Guido del Mestri, 82, a member of the Roman Curia, died yesterday in a clinic in Nuremberg, Germany. He was a Vatican diplomat who became an archbishop in 1961. He served as papal nuncio to West Germany from 1975 to 1984, before Pope John Paul II named him to the College of Cardinals in 1991. He was born in Banja Luka in Bosnia-Herzegovina, studied at a Jesuit college and at the Gregorian University in Rome and was ordained in Rome in 1936.
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NEWS
Lionel Foster | December 13, 2012
Last week, while driving to work, I heard an NPR story that included snippets of an interview with a woman who had just applied for a marriage license. This would not have been newsworthy if not for the fact that she was gay. On Nov. 6, voters in Washington, Maryland and Maine approved marriage equality laws. Last Thursday was the first day that gay and lesbian couples in Washington state could fill out forms and exercise their new right. It was a very long time coming, so I would have forgiven the woman for screaming with joy or drenching the microphone in tears, but that's not what she did. I didn't catch her name or what town she was from, but give or take a syllable, she said something like this: "It feels good to finally be normal," happily and wearily, as if she had finally set down a very heavy weight.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | December 30, 1990
* 5.6 million: Dollar value of the endorsement contracts secured for 14-year-old tennis player Jennifer Capriati.* 8,833: Wins in the 40-year career of jockey Bill Shoemaker, who retired after finishing fourth on Patchy Groundfog Feb. 3.* 185.989: Average mph speed achieved by Arie Luyendyk to win the 74th Indianapolis 500.* 45: Age at which Hale Irwin became the oldest winner of the U.S. Open golf championship by beating Mike Donald in a playoff.* 33.6: Scoring average of the Chicago Bulls' Michael Jordan in the 1989-90 National Basketball Association season.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 25, 2002
WASHINGTON- Perhaps the most notable aspect of President Bush's stop in South Korea on his Asian trip last week was his refraining from a repetition there of his characterization of North Korea, Iraq and Iran as an "axis of evil." In Seoul, where his earlier bellicose language riled the locals who have been waging an uphill effort to achieve reunification with North Korea, he was quick to reassure the two Koreas that he supports that objective. Not only did he not repeat the "axis of evil" reference, Mr. Bush declared that he had "no intention of invading North Korea."
NEWS
November 8, 1995
Isang Yun, 78, the Korean-born avant-garde composer whose kidnapping and trial by South Korea raised an international furor a quarter-century ago, died of a lung infection Friday in Berlin.Mr. Yun was known in Korea for his songs about Korean unification and his political views. In Germany, he was admired for his compositions combining Eastern and Western traditions.Living in West Germany since the 1950s, Mr. Yun visited Communist North Korea in 1963. He was kidnapped in 1967 by South Korean agents, put on trial in Seoul and convicted of unauthorized contacts with the north.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | November 18, 1990
BERLIN -- A plastic rocket, cardboard tanks and a dancing skeleton led 5,000 men and women through downtown Berlin yesterday to protest the German government's drafting of Berliners for the first time since World War II.For 45 years most of Germany's largest city had not seen a German soldier and its young men were immune from the draft. But now the German army is back, and Berlin is sending young men to do 12 months of compulsory training.The changes result from the fact that West Berlin, two-thirds of unified Berlin's area and population, has lost its special status as a territory occupied by France, Britain and the U.S.So long as it was officially occupied, no German soldiers could be stationed there and its residents were exempt from the draft.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | October 21, 1990
BERLIN -- Two years after being spiffily renovated, Berlin's famous Zoologischer Garten train station has recaptured its old air: Unwashed and drunken men loll around the waiting halls, beggars wait outside for a coin and burned-out heroin addicts shuffle around aimlessly.They are often hustled off by patrolling policemen but always return, an unwelcome reminder that in the days of German unity and unbroken economic growth there are ever more people living in poverty.The fact that the number of social welfare recipients increases almost every month to new highs has been forgotten in the wave of euphoria and worry about German unity.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 12, 1990
BERLIN -- The price of German unity was pushed another notch higher yesterday when West Germany agreed that the Soviet Union would receive $8 billion for the withdrawal of its 365,000 troops in East Germany.The agreement, one of the last hurdles to Soviet approval of German unification, was confirmed after weeks of haggling over the price tag. The Soviets had asked for nearly twice the amount, saying it was necessary for transportation, rehousing and reintegration of the troops, who will leave over the next four years.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | September 17, 1990
Herbert Brokering hands out packets of flower seeds as small symbols of the great changes taking place in East Germany.Brokering is a Lutheran clergyman and teacher who was in Germany when the Wall cracked last November. He's just returned from another trip this summer as East and West Germany prepared for the unification slated now for Oct. 3.The seeds from the "old" East Germany come from "the people's own seed industry" in Erfurt, a city where horticulture has been established for years, a city, this Lutheran clergyman notes, where Martin Luther studied and became a priest.
NEWS
By Stephen E. Nordlinger and Stephen E. Nordlinger,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 26, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush announced yesterday the formation of an international clearinghouse to accelerate financial aid to needy Middle East countries whose cooperation officials regard as essential in maintaining the economic embargo against Iraq.Expressing concern over the "staggering burden" faced by these front-line countries, the president told the annual meeting of the 152-nation World Bank and International Monetary Fund that he wanted "to transform [financial] commitments into concrete contributions."
TRAVEL
By Martha K. Haas and Martha K. Haas,Special to the Sun | November 14, 1999
A MEMORABLE EXPERIENCEBerlin 1989, on the brinkLeaving West Germany on our way to Berlin, we felt as if we had driven from a color movie into a black-and-white silent film. It was September 1989, and the Berlin Wall and communism still stood.As we drove through an opening in a dense border of barbed wire at Bay-reuth, armed guards stopped our car. They scrutinized our passports and instructed us to go directly to Berlin without leaving the highway at any time.Remembering the colorful and lively towns in West Germany, we were disheartened by the bleakness we encountered.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
In a dazzling new stadium outside Paris today, soccer professionals from a record 32 nations open play to determine by mid-July a new world champion in the sport for the 16th time since two Frenchmen thought up the idea.Without doubt, the quadrennial World Cup -- first contested among 13 nations in 1930 -- has evolved into Earth's greatest tournament for a team sport, dwarfing in fans, countries and players other world events for, among others, basketball and ice hockey.Only the much older, multi-event Olympics compete in terms of scope, hype, and nowadays, television viewers and advertising revenue.
NEWS
April 2, 1997
Jon Stone,65, who help create Big Bird and Cookie Monster as the co-creator and Emmy Award-winning writer, producer and director of "Sesame Street," died Sunday in New York of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.He wrote the pilot script for "Sesame Street" and was the head writer and one of the three original producers of the program, which first aired on PBS on Nov. 10, 1969. He remained the principal director of the children's show until last year.Mr. Stone was also an author of children's books, including "The Monster at the End of This Book," which was published by Little Golden Books in 1971.
NEWS
August 27, 1996
Erwin Leiser,73, who was born in Berlin to Jewish parents, fled Hitler's Germany and went on to win praise for documentary filmmaking about the Nazi era, died of heart failure Thursday in Zurich, where he had lived since 1961.His documentary feature film about the history of Germany under Hitler, entitled "Mein Kampf," was composed of clips from old newsreels and film obtained from both Allied and German sources.The film appeared in 1960, went on to be shown in scores of countries -- it was a box-office hit even in West Germany -- and was applauded by the New York Times critic Vincent Canby as "an effective summation of the Nazi era as recorded on film."
NEWS
November 8, 1995
Isang Yun, 78, the Korean-born avant-garde composer whose kidnapping and trial by South Korea raised an international furor a quarter-century ago, died of a lung infection Friday in Berlin.Mr. Yun was known in Korea for his songs about Korean unification and his political views. In Germany, he was admired for his compositions combining Eastern and Western traditions.Living in West Germany since the 1950s, Mr. Yun visited Communist North Korea in 1963. He was kidnapped in 1967 by South Korean agents, put on trial in Seoul and convicted of unauthorized contacts with the north.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 24, 1995
BONN, Germany -- Closing a final chapter of the Cold War, Germany's highest court ruled yesterday that East Germany's spymasters could not be tried in a reunited Germany and that top espionage officials already convicted would not have to serve their sentences.The ruling, on a 5-3 vote, amounted to a virtual amnesty for former Communist spymasters such as Markus Wolf, the shadowy figure behind three decades of East German intelligence operations.Under the decision, the highest-ranking espionage controllers of the former East Germany will no longer be obliged to serve sentences imposed on them or face criminal proceedings, even though many of the agents they ran will remain in jail.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 25, 1991
BERLIN -- Markus Wolf -- "the man without a face," once regarded as the Communist world's most brilliant spy -- came in from the cold yesterday.The man who headed East Germany's intelligence service for 30years during the Cold War crossed the border voluntarily from Austria to Germany, where he is to stand trial on espionage charges. At first he was released on $30,000 bail after convincing a federal judge that he would not flee the country again. But later he was ordered back to jail pending the outcome of an appeal by prosecutors.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | May 18, 1993
CHICAGO -- A survey of 13 predominantly Judeo-Christian countries shows substantial majorities in most of them believe in God and in life after death, refuting perceptions of social scientists that society isn't as religious as it used to be."It is too early to write an obituary notice for religion," said Rev. Andrew Greeley, Roman Catholic priest-sociologist-author and a coordinator of the study released yesterday by the International Social Survey Program. "God didn't die, not even under socialism."
NEWS
April 13, 1995
Guenter Guillaume, 68, whose admission that he was a spy for the former East Germany forced the 1974 resignation of West German Chancellor Willy Brandt, died Monday after a heart attack in Hamburg, Germany. He was tried in West Germany and sentenced to 13 years in prison. After serving seven, he was returned to East Germany in a 1981 spy swap.Dick Pothier, 55, a prize-winning reporter and columnist at the Philadelphia Inquirer who wrote an account of his 1990 heart transplant, was found dead Monday at his retirement home in Vermont.
NEWS
August 10, 1993
Cardinal Guido del Mestri, 82, a member of the Roman Curia, died yesterday in a clinic in Nuremberg, Germany. He was a Vatican diplomat who became an archbishop in 1961. He served as papal nuncio to West Germany from 1975 to 1984, before Pope John Paul II named him to the College of Cardinals in 1991. He was born in Banja Luka in Bosnia-Herzegovina, studied at a Jesuit college and at the Gregorian University in Rome and was ordained in Rome in 1936.
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