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By New York Times News Service | July 26, 1992
Many visitors to London assume that its theater scene is confined to the West End, within walking distance of Piccadilly Circus. But there are several other performing arts venues -- a few stops on the Underground from the center -- that produce first-class theater at prices well below those of the West End. The London Tourist Board has produced a guide listing 24 of them called "Beyond the West End Theater."Among them are the Almeida and the King's Head in Islington, north ofcentral London, which have attracted such artists as Glenda Jackson, Claire Bloom and Kenneth Branagh.
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NEWS
By Patti Restivo | May 1, 2014
It's been more than a decade since Maureen Rogers helped relocate the Burtonsville Players - a nonprofit theater group that's performed in the Laurel area for more than 35 years - to the Laurel Mill Playhouse on the west end of Main Street. Well established on Main Street for her networking as the little theater's public liaison and artistic director, Rogers has taken on another job toward the other end of the street. Last year, she was hired as administrator of the Laurel Board of Trade, and works in the group's small, tucked-away office on Main Street.
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FEATURES
By Michele Nevard and Michele Nevard,London Bureau | June 27, 1993
West End theaters expect 10.9 million visitors this year. At least 14 percent of those visitors will be Americans, according to a representative from the Society of West End Theaters.Despite the recession, London's theaters are producing some exciting work -- new plays and old.Arthur Miller's new play, "The Last Yankee," is in the West End at the Duke of York's Theatre. During its last 12 weeks at the Young Vic it played to more than 30,000 people.The last Yankee is Leroy Hamilton, a New England carpenter whose wife Patricia has been on a variety of drugs for depression the past 15 years.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 20, 2006
LONDON -- Two hundred years of history are coming unstitched on Savile Row, as tailors who make bespoke clothes for the rich and famous flee soaring rents. Sewing shops along the street where Fred Astaire, Cary Grant and Britain's Prince Charles once bought custom-made suits are being converted into luxury offices and stores. The growth of London's financial services industry has made the West End, where Savile Row is located, the most expensive place in the world to rent office space.
FEATURES
By Alan Cowell and Alan Cowell,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 2003
LONDON - In the run-up to the invasion of Iraq, when Justin Butcher's Madness of George Dubya was playing at a fringe theater in north London, Butcher began to sense that some Americans might bridle at his virulent lampoon of the Bush administration and its readiness to go to war. But now that Dubya has moved from the fringe into the mainstream West End for a four-week run and has been hailed by some critics here as an overdue revival of political satire...
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 18, 1996
LONDON -- London's glitzy West End is no longer the heart of British theater. Sure, it has the blockbusters with helicopters, crashing chandeliers and choruses of singing cats -- you know, the same megamusicals that are on Broadway.But when it comes to the long-standing British theatrical tradition of challenging performances and drama, the nonprofit and smaller companies -- like our regional and off-Broadway theaters -- are where the exciting risks are being taken and met.Consider, for instance, the thrill of seeing Fiona Shaw, the current femme phenomenon of the British stage, playing two leads in repertory at the Royal National Theatre -- quick-witted Mistress Millamant in "The Way of the World" and the title role in a gender-bending "Richard II."
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,los angeles times | April 4, 1999
Theater is not a luxury of progress. It is integral to our identity as a nation," British Prime Minister Tony Blair once said. This explains why I love to see plays in the sprawling English capital, why I take in at least one whenever I pass through the city, and why in January I spent a whole week glutting myself on London theater.For play-going, I prefer it to New York, because the English put their money where their mouth is, lavishing millions on the arts. Two great dramatic institutions are among the chief beneficiaries: The Royal National Theatre, led by Trevor Nunn, in a modern complex on the south bank of the River Thames; and the Royal Shakespeare Company, which spends part of every winter at the Barbican Center in London under the artistic direction of Adrian Noble.
FEATURES
By BETTY LOWRY and BETTY LOWRY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1996
Bermuda can be a puzzle. For more than 350 years the linked island chain has been under one flag, yet its history records major social and political diversity -- not so much between neighbors but between its geographic end points.They say your attitude begins to change as you travel east and cross the world's smallest drawbridge (22 inches wide, just enough to permit passage of a sailboat mast) between Somerset Island and Southampton Parish. As for residents, although East Enders and West Enders occasionally rub shoulders in central Hamilton, only taxi drivers appear to make the tip-to-tip journey very often.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2001
TAKING A STEP back in time will provide family activities for a local community and extra income for a senior activity center. West End Place, a Westminster nonprofit organization that provides day care for senior citizens, has planned a May Day celebration from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 5 at its facility, 7 Schoolhouse Ave. Organizers thought of the idea when they realized that May Day celebrations at their facility, the former West End Elementary School,...
NEWS
By Patti Restivo | May 1, 2014
It's been more than a decade since Maureen Rogers helped relocate the Burtonsville Players - a nonprofit theater group that's performed in the Laurel area for more than 35 years - to the Laurel Mill Playhouse on the west end of Main Street. Well established on Main Street for her networking as the little theater's public liaison and artistic director, Rogers has taken on another job toward the other end of the street. Last year, she was hired as administrator of the Laurel Board of Trade, and works in the group's small, tucked-away office on Main Street.
FEATURES
By Alan Cowell and Alan Cowell,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 2003
LONDON - In the run-up to the invasion of Iraq, when Justin Butcher's Madness of George Dubya was playing at a fringe theater in north London, Butcher began to sense that some Americans might bridle at his virulent lampoon of the Bush administration and its readiness to go to war. But now that Dubya has moved from the fringe into the mainstream West End for a four-week run and has been hailed by some critics here as an overdue revival of political satire...
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2001
TAKING A STEP back in time will provide family activities for a local community and extra income for a senior activity center. West End Place, a Westminster nonprofit organization that provides day care for senior citizens, has planned a May Day celebration from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 5 at its facility, 7 Schoolhouse Ave. Organizers thought of the idea when they realized that May Day celebrations at their facility, the former West End Elementary School,...
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 8, 2000
LOS ANGELES - The heavy lifting lasted for 40 years, from the game-winning jump shots that elevated the Los Angeles Lakers into the upper echelon of professional basketball to the savvy front office decision-making that carried the franchise to four league championships in 18 years. And now, Jerry West is tired. West, the man responsible for the acquisition of such Lakers stars as Shaquille O'Neal, Kobe Bryant, James Worthy and Byron Scott, announced yesterday that he was walking away from his responsibilities as the club's executive vice president.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,los angeles times | April 4, 1999
Theater is not a luxury of progress. It is integral to our identity as a nation," British Prime Minister Tony Blair once said. This explains why I love to see plays in the sprawling English capital, why I take in at least one whenever I pass through the city, and why in January I spent a whole week glutting myself on London theater.For play-going, I prefer it to New York, because the English put their money where their mouth is, lavishing millions on the arts. Two great dramatic institutions are among the chief beneficiaries: The Royal National Theatre, led by Trevor Nunn, in a modern complex on the south bank of the River Thames; and the Royal Shakespeare Company, which spends part of every winter at the Barbican Center in London under the artistic direction of Adrian Noble.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
A former Westminster school building will reopen next week )) with a new role and a new name.The former West End School will become West End Place. The renovated building will feature an adult day care center and eight studio apartments for low-income seniors.Karen K. Blandford, Westminster city housing and community development administrator, obtained $710,000 in grants for the renovation of the school building at 7 Schoolhouse Ave. It most recently housed the Westminster Senior Center.Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland Inc. contracted with the Westminster Common Council to use the city-owned building after it became vacant in October 1996.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
Driving down narrow roads bracketed by woods and farm fields, by houses with trim lawns and two-car garages, Charles C. Feaga pulled onto Frederick Road near Glenwood and headed west.He eased his Chevrolet onto the shoulder a mile past Route 97, stopping at a weathered mile-marker that guided travelers west from Baltimore in the days before concrete and automobiles.Feaga, a 65-year-old farmer and Howard County councilman, says these stone markers once could be found all along Frederick Road.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1996
What a night. "The West" concludes; "Relativity," the latest offering from Ed Zwick and Marshall Herskovitz, debuts on ABC at 10 p.m.; and Mel Brooks pays a visit to "Mad About You." So what are you doing reading a newspaper?"Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Roseanne and Dan, who just got back together last week, win the lottery. Man, these folks are on a roll. Fortunately, they insist their newfound wealth won't change them. Right! ABC."Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
NEWS
November 12, 1996
The city of Westminster is looking for photos and memories of the West End School for inclusion in a multimedia presentation on the past and future of the building.Karen Blandford, administrator of housing and community development, is seeking "school photos, happy memories or senior center good times" to record for a production of the Carroll Community College's computer graphics department.The video will be shown at an open house Nov. 19.Information: 848-2261.FireWestminster: Firefighters from Westminster and Pleasant Valley responded at 9: 20 p.m. Friday for an alarm in the 200 block of W. Main St. Units were out three minutes.
NEWS
November 12, 1996
The city of Westminster is looking for photos and memories of the West End School for inclusion in a multimedia presentation on the past and future of the building.Karen Blandford, administrator of housing and community development, is seeking "school photos, happy memories or senior center good times" to record for a production of the Carroll Community College's computer graphics department.The video will be shown at an open house Nov. 19.Information: 848-2261.FireWestminster: Firefighters from Westminster and Pleasant Valley responded at 9: 20 p.m. Friday for an alarm in the 200 block of W. Main St. Units were out three minutes.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1996
What a night. "The West" concludes; "Relativity," the latest offering from Ed Zwick and Marshall Herskovitz, debuts on ABC at 10 p.m.; and Mel Brooks pays a visit to "Mad About You." So what are you doing reading a newspaper?"Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Roseanne and Dan, who just got back together last week, win the lottery. Man, these folks are on a roll. Fortunately, they insist their newfound wealth won't change them. Right! ABC."Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
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