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By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1999
In the heat of a Timonium cemetery, dozens of old soldiers sweated like young grunts, their eyes fixed on a farmer from Utah, their hands grasping this Western visitor's weapon of choice. Chewing gum. The Candy Bomber -- retired Air Force Col. Gail S. Halvorsen of Provo, Utah -- launched the observance of Memorial Day yesterday, 24 hours early, during an unusual ceremony at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens. Punctuated by the giveaway of 1,500 packs of Wrigley's Doublemint, the service largely avoided scattershot remembrances of combat past in favor of a targeted seminar on the history of the Berlin airlift of 1948 and 1949 -- and Halvorsen's surreptitious role in it. The colonel's speech, combined with private testimony from a half-dozen airlift veterans seated behind him, offered a timely reminder of the value of two American traditions not always celebrated on Memorial Day: straying from the rules, and showing humanity toward enemies.
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NEWS
By Theodore G. Venetoulis | November 22, 2013
There's not much left to be said about John Kennedy. I can't say I really knew him. But I did meet him a few times, and on the last occasion, he actually called me by name (good staff work, I'm sure). There weren't many Maryland politicians who backed his presidential candidacy in those early primaries. The dominant Tawes-Hocker machine opposed him. One of his most enthusiastic supporters was Jerry Hoffberger, who owned both the National Brewing Company and the Baltimore Orioles.
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NEWS
March 18, 1996
John Fiehn, 76, who covered the Berlin Wall crisis during more than 30 years as an Associated Press and AP-Dow Jones reporter, died last Monday in Frankfurt, Germany, after suffering a heart attack in January. On Aug. 13, 1961, Mr. Fiehn saw the East Germans start stringing barbed wire across the city the start of the Berlin Wall. He paid a woman at a kiosk in West Berlin to keep her telephone line open so he could dictate the breaking story and saw a uniformed East German soldier jump across the wire with his weapon, escaping to West Berlin.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | December 14, 2007
As a rule, the Republicans campaigning for president sound more like they are running for sheriff of Yuma County, Ariz. In this race, the acceptable lines on illegal immigration are hard, harder and hardest. It's rare to hear someone call for policies that include "love and compassion," as Sen. John McCain did in Sunday's Univision debate. Compassion for illegal immigrants? Is he kidding? In reality, Mr. McCain is truer to GOP tradition than Mike Huckabee, who says, "I will take our country back for those who belong here," or Rudolph W. Giuliani, who says foreigners should have to carry cards with biometric identifiers, or Mitt Romney, who insists Mr. Huckabee and Mr. Giuliani are not nearly tough enough.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | June 16, 1992
BERLIN -- Sgt. Jerry Brooks can't help grinning when he thinks of the irony. His unit's tanks -- the symbol of Western resolve to hold this city during the hottest days of the Cold War -- will not be allowed back into the United States until every bit of German soil is washed off."Department of Agriculture regulations against pests. It makes sense but is kind of funny. None of the soil we defended is allowed back," said the 27-year-old tank commander, who was born in Baltimore and grew up in Lynchburg, Va.Sergeant Brooks and his three-man crew have spent the last two weeks taking their M-1A1 tanks apart, meticulously cleaning them, then putting them back together.
NEWS
By Harry J. Gilmore | November 9, 2004
FIFTEEN YEARS ago today, determined throngs of East Berliners breached the Berlin Wall, and the United States and its allies helped facilitate the safe movement of Berliners through the wall that historic night. This story is being told for American readers for the first time. With the defeat of the Nazi regime, the victorious Allies divided Germany and Berlin into four zones (sectors, in the case of Berlin). The victors were unable to agree on Germany's future, and two German states were created, the Federal Republic of Germany in the west and the German Democratic Republic in the east.
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne | October 3, 1991
Berlin -- Berlin on the first anniversary of German reunification is a strange, exciting and disorienting place for a newspaperman whose entire career has been bracketed by the Cold War.I first saw the city riding the Airlift in 1949. It was a mass of rubble, a monument to the destruction wrought by the Hitler legions who had goose-stepped down the Unter den Linden only a few years before.Berlin, what there was of it, was still one huge single metropolis -- the largest between Paris and Moscow -- despite Soviet, French, British and American sectors where the four military commanders governed.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | May 27, 1992
BERLIN -- On Buddha's birthday, Vietnamese here gather in their storefront temple on Krefelderstrasse to worship before an altar bedecked with fruit and flowers, silk lotus blossoms, burning candles and smoking incense.They sing and chant the sutras, eat spring rolls and curries, laugh with their children, sit under the old flag of South Vietnam, and talk of their lost homeland.The drapes are drawn and Berlin is shut out for a while. Vietnamese are under considerable pressure in Germany, especially in East Berlin and what used to be Communist Germany.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | July 19, 1994
New York. -- The last time I saw Berlin, less than a year ago, it was pleasantly boring. The wall and the tension were down, the feeling that perhaps tomorrow we die was gone, and the ''capital'' of a unified Germany was coming back down to earth after more than 40 years as a ''flashpoint'' or ''tinderbox,'' the place where World War III would begin.So President Clinton was in the wrong place at the wrong time last week to get what he wanted (and needs): a flashy rhetorical foreign-policy triumph that might have reminded Americans of the dangerous excitement when President Kennedy looked over the wall between West Berlin and East Berlin in 1963, or even the lesser moment in 1987 when President Reagan shouted that Soviet President Gorbachev should tear down the wall.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | June 13, 1991
BERLIN -- The story goes that the Jewish community of Adass Jisroel died when its members fled or were murdered during the Holocaust.For years, people believed the story. East Berlin used some of Adass Jisroel's property as offices, West Berlin built apartments on other pieces of its land, and the official Jewish Community of Berlin gave its seal of approval to the actions.But Adass Jisroel never really died.Much to the surprise and embarrassment of the Jewish Community of Berlin and Berlin authorities, Adass Jisroel has re-emerged after 50 years as a small but vigorous Orthodox Jewish community.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | March 6, 2006
BERLIN -- More than 16 years after the wall fell, West Berlin and East Berlin have melded together enough that a visitor wandering around the city often can't tell which was which. But at a dingy gray building surrounded by concrete walls topped with barbed wire, there is no escaping the creepy feel of communism. This was a prison run by the East German secret police, the Stasi, which has been preserved as a memorial to the crimes of the past. Our guide today is a paternal figure with the learned air of a retired college professor.
NEWS
By Harry J. Gilmore | November 9, 2004
FIFTEEN YEARS ago today, determined throngs of East Berliners breached the Berlin Wall, and the United States and its allies helped facilitate the safe movement of Berliners through the wall that historic night. This story is being told for American readers for the first time. With the defeat of the Nazi regime, the victorious Allies divided Germany and Berlin into four zones (sectors, in the case of Berlin). The victors were unable to agree on Germany's future, and two German states were created, the Federal Republic of Germany in the west and the German Democratic Republic in the east.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 30, 2000
BERLIN - Before the wall came down, Angela Heine loved to visit the East Berlin district of Prenzlauer Berg. Its once-elegant buildings attracted students, squatters, artists and dissidents, who mixed easily with the working-class crowd. She still likes it. A 10-minute bicycle ride from the heart of Berlin, the district is unique and yet something of a microcosm of Germany, which marks the 10th anniversary of its reunification Tuesday. In few places in the country do such different kinds of Germans - from well-paid western newcomers to aging eastern laborers - live in such proximity.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1999
In the heat of a Timonium cemetery, dozens of old soldiers sweated like young grunts, their eyes fixed on a farmer from Utah, their hands grasping this Western visitor's weapon of choice. Chewing gum. The Candy Bomber -- retired Air Force Col. Gail S. Halvorsen of Provo, Utah -- launched the observance of Memorial Day yesterday, 24 hours early, during an unusual ceremony at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens. Punctuated by the giveaway of 1,500 packs of Wrigley's Doublemint, the service largely avoided scattershot remembrances of combat past in favor of a targeted seminar on the history of the Berlin airlift of 1948 and 1949 -- and Halvorsen's surreptitious role in it. The colonel's speech, combined with private testimony from a half-dozen airlift veterans seated behind him, offered a timely reminder of the value of two American traditions not always celebrated on Memorial Day: straying from the rules, and showing humanity toward enemies.
NEWS
By Lori Montgomery and Lori Montgomery,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 4, 1999
BERLIN -- Ten years ago, the people of Germany toppled the Berlin Wall. Now the city building department is trying to finish the job.Berlin wants to tear down one of the last remaining bits of the wall to make way for a road. The plan has outraged preservationists, artists and human rights activists, who are flocking to the aid of the wall's owner, an eccentric entrepreneur who is fighting back in court."This is the most historic place in Germany, and there's nothing left of history in this place," says Erich Stanke, 39, who has owned the chunk of the wall since an East German military commander handed it over to him in 1990.
NEWS
June 22, 1998
Hans Conrad Schuhmann, 56, a former East German soldier immortalized in a photograph as he leapt across a barbed wire fence to freedom in West Berlin, hanged himself Saturday. He left no note, and police said the motive was unclear.He was serving in an East German army unit assigned to stop people from escaping when he fled across the border himself. He was in uniform and clutching his rifle when he was photographed jumping over a three-foot barrier of barbed wire Aug. 14, 1961 -- one day after Communist authorities closed the border and began construction of the Berlin Wall.
NEWS
June 22, 1998
Hans Conrad Schuhmann, 56, a former East German soldier immortalized in a photograph as he leapt across a barbed wire fence to freedom in West Berlin, hanged himself Saturday. He left no note, and police said the motive was unclear.He was serving in an East German army unit assigned to stop people from escaping when he fled across the border himself. He was in uniform and clutching his rifle when he was photographed jumping over a three-foot barrier of barbed wire Aug. 14, 1961 -- one day after Communist authorities closed the border and began construction of the Berlin Wall.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 1992
BERLIN -- Political leaders from around the world joined Germans in bidding farewell yesterday to Willy Brandt, eulogizing the former West German chancellor as a pragmatic idealist whose visionary policies helped change the face of Europe."
NEWS
July 23, 1996
THESE ARE HEADY days for Berlin. Although Germany's largest city -- home to 3.5 million people -- will not replace Bonn as the capital until 1999, feverish construction is proof that it is reacquiring its old reputation as "the crossroads of Europe."Some $20 billion has been invested in Berlin since 1990, when the wall that had divided the city came down at the collapse of East Germany. No fewer than 1,200 cranes are counted at several hundred sites where major construction is in progress.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 26, 1996
BERLIN -- The bureaucrat's computer clicks and whirs, and onto the screen comes bad news concerning Tree No. 00018-L0022 in the district of Zehlendorf.It has been chopped down at the ripe old age of 117, after city workers detected a case of poisoning by "Hundeurin."Translation: Death by dog urine.The bureaucrat, Hans-Achim Gottlebe, keeps punching keys, and we learn that five other trees in the district have died this way during the past two years. In each case he can tell you the kind of tree, its age, its size, its street, its fungus problems and even more, if you care to know.
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