Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWest African
IN THE NEWS

West African

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2006
In Ghana, "tubom" means "let's play." Tuesday night's crowd at the Maryland City Branch Library in Laurel needed no translation. From the opening calls of "Tubom!" by West African performance duo Anansegromma, more than 60 people intuitively responded with rhythmic hand claps and enthusiastic knee slaps. Kofi Dennis and Kwame Ansah-Brew, both native Ghanaians, led their spirited "Tubom Tubom: African Dance, Drum, Story and Games" presentation for 45 minutes in the library's meeting room.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2008
Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will lose its flights to Africa in May, when North American Airlines cuts service to Lagos, Nigeria, and Accra, Ghana. It is the latest blow to BWI's efforts to bolster its international service, after Icelandair's pullout last month. It also means the large West African immigrant population in the Baltimore-Washington region will now have to travel further for flights to their home countries. Rising fuel costs, coupled with competition from routes Delta Air Lines recently launched from New York to West Africa, have forced North American Airlines to shut down all commercial service, company spokesman Steve Forsyth said.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2008
Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will lose its flights to Africa in May, when North American Airlines cuts service to Lagos, Nigeria, and Accra, Ghana. It is the latest blow to BWI's efforts to bolster its international service, after Icelandair's pullout last month. It also means the large West African immigrant population in the Baltimore-Washington region will now have to travel further for flights to their home countries. Rising fuel costs, coupled with competition from routes Delta Air Lines recently launched from New York to West Africa, have forced North American Airlines to shut down all commercial service, company spokesman Steve Forsyth said.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2006
By Nadine Khtikian's count, Americans can do their part to end poverty in west Africa just by donating a pair of used sneakers. It may seem an odd approach, but since January, Khtikian has been collecting athletic shoes from around Baltimore with the aim of shipping thousands of sneakers to Ghana, where they will be refurbished and sold. Half of the proceeds will go toward training a needy farm family in environmentally sound agricultural techniques. At $3 each, 500 pairs of shoes will pay for a water pump, a well, a bicycle, chickens, assorted trees and additional items.
NEWS
July 23, 2003
A LEADING REBEL group's declaration of a cease-fire yesterday seemingly offers one last chance for Liberia. This truce, after days of fierce shelling, is a godsend that should be used to prevent that West African country from further self-destruction. Two things must now follow in short order to make the announced cease-fire stick: An international peacekeeping force -- mostly from neighboring West African countries but under the auspices of the United Nations and the United States -- must be quickly landed in Liberia to supervise the truce.
FEATURES
By Eric V. Copage and Eric V. Copage,New York Times Special Features | February 17, 1994
In his native Ghana, Dr. Kwaku Ofori-Ansa always knew that kente cloth had a special significance."It was always around, but not something to be seen on a daily basis. It used to be for very, very special occasions," says Dr. Ofori-Ansa, who lives in Hyattsville. The professor of African art at Howard University is writing a book on the historical significance of kente cloth.Kente cloth and the vibrant prints based on its patterns are everywhere: in African-American churches as narrow columns of colorful fabric cascading over the shoulders of chorus members; on crowded urban streets in the vivid hues of pedestrians' hats; nTC as blossoms of light on drab, rainy days when brightly colored umbrellas are unfurled.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Yesterday, the Americans arrived in Liberia but in small numbers. A helicopter took seven Marines to Monrovia, the capital of the West African country that seems intent on tearing itself apart. The Marines were sent to prepare the way for humanitarian aid to be distributed to thousands of refugees who are desperate for food and medicine. More than 1,000 civilians have been killed in two months of fighting, which has forced hundreds of thousands of civilians to flee to the capital and caused critical shortages of food, water and medicine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | February 5, 1998
In the Mandingo culture of West Africa, KanKouran is the spirit who guides adolescent boys through the ceremony of initiation into manhood.KanKouran West African Dance Company of Washington, which performs this weekend at the Baltimore Museum of Art, is the performing arm of an organization that helps young African-Americans realize their African heritage.It was founded in 1983 by Assane Konte and Abdou Kounta, both of Dakar, Senegal, who met as members of the Ballet Africaine de Diebel Guee.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | February 16, 2000
February is Black History Month, a time for celebration of the contributions and rich history of African-Americans. By studying stories that originated in Africa, we better understand its culture and the ancestors who told them. African folk tales are fun to read, but also contain valuable lessons. Because not everything is stated explicitly, your child will learn to go beyond the actual words in the story to interpret the meaning. As you read, stop occasionally at a critical point and ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
NEWS
April 14, 1994
An end to Liberia's four-year civil war may be in sight. Peace-keeping armies of Liberia's West African neighbors have begun disarming some 60,000 rebel rabble who have been raping and pillaging the countryside but are now gathering in designated areas under the eyes of United Nations observers. A five-member government representing the main political-guerrilla factions began operations, the sticking points mediated by former President Canaan Banana of Zimbabwe.These measures -- actually negotiated last July and just now being implemented -- postpone the question of who will wield power.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2006
In Ghana, "tubom" means "let's play." Tuesday night's crowd at the Maryland City Branch Library in Laurel needed no translation. From the opening calls of "Tubom!" by West African performance duo Anansegromma, more than 60 people intuitively responded with rhythmic hand claps and enthusiastic knee slaps. Kofi Dennis and Kwame Ansah-Brew, both native Ghanaians, led their spirited "Tubom Tubom: African Dance, Drum, Story and Games" presentation for 45 minutes in the library's meeting room.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2005
Two small bundles of rusted nails and a pierced white disc might seem ordinary at first glance, but to archaeologist Mark P. Leone and his team of students from the University of Maryland, College Park, they represent a major discovery. The items were part of an African-American hoodoo cache concealed in the hearth of a Georgian mansion in Annapolis that was unearthed this summer. And to Leone, the striking part is that they are not that old. They date from the early 20th century, a time when ancient folk practices like hoodoo were thought to have all but vanished.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2004
As the harried mother of a newborn, frustrated in her search for a ready-made sauce to use in making the West African dishes of her native Cameroon, Julie Ndjee decided that she would have to create one. After many months of research followed by trial and error, the Elkridge resident hit on a recipe that worked. Now she travels the Baltimore-Washington region promoting Neilly's Ultimate Seasonings, a slow-cooked blend of tomatoes, onions and spices named for her daughter. More than 20 specialty shops stock her sauce, and Ndjee said that with other shops picking up her product and restaurants using it in their dishes, she expects to reach $1 million in sales this year, far surpassing last year's estimate of $160,000.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 20, 2004
ABUJA, Nigeria - "GREETINGS: IN ORDER TO TRANSFER OUT (USD 36MILLION DOLLARS) FROM OUR BANK. I HAVE THE COURAGE TO ASK YOU TO LOOK FOR A RELIABLE AND HONEST PERSON WHO WILL BE CAPABLE FOR THIS IMPORTANT BUSINESS BELIEVING THAT YOU WILL NEVER LET ME DOWN EITHER NOW OR IN THE FUTURE. ... " Flattered? Interested in doing business? The author of this e-mail hopes so. For more than two decades, Nigerian scam artists have circulated letters, faxes and e-mails like this one in hopes of swindling gullible and greedy foreigners out of millions of dollars.
NEWS
December 1, 2003
IVORY COAST'S name is a misnomer. Although its state emblem depicts an elephant's head, hardly any of those majestic tusked animals are left there. Instead, cocoa is the West African country's claim to fame. It's the world's leading grower of beans that give chocolate its delicious flavor. That distinction, too, is in danger of disappearing. A rekindled rebellion has disrupted this year's harvesting, curtailing output and sending world cocoa prices to new highs. Ivory Coast used to be West Africa's wealthiest and most stable country.
NEWS
August 14, 2003
THE LONG-OVERDUE resignation and exit of President Charles Taylor offers a short window of opportunity for Liberia to regain stability and peace. The United States and the rest of the international community should use it to prevent the West African country from sliding into a new nightmare of suffering. Any hesitation at this point will only aggravate a dangerous power vacuum. Fourteen years of constant turmoil have torn apart Liberia's social fabric. Key institutions are in a shambles.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | June 21, 1991
Kay Nettey, a state employee on her lunch break, headed for Mondawmin Mall because she heard there was something new there.She found it. Scattered throughout the mall's center court are 18 colorful pushcarts, many filled with African and African-American hTC artifacts, jewelry and clothing. Other carts sell such things as snow balls, makeup and pastries aimed at the mall's patrons, 98 percent of whom are black.Mondawmin, which is owned by the Rouse Corp., may be the first mall to feature carts specifically targeting African-American shoppers.
NEWS
By Russell Geekie | July 10, 2003
THE BUSH administration certainly never considered including the war-racked West African country of Liberia on the itinerary of President Bush's five-nation tour of Africa that began Tuesday. The tour is meant to accentuate the positive in relatively successful Botswana, Senegal and Uganda and the regional powerhouses, Nigeria and South Africa. But Liberia was thrust high onto the agenda after rebels reached the capital, Monrovia, last month, and an estimated 1,000 civilians were killed in ensuing battles.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Yesterday, the Americans arrived in Liberia but in small numbers. A helicopter took seven Marines to Monrovia, the capital of the West African country that seems intent on tearing itself apart. The Marines were sent to prepare the way for humanitarian aid to be distributed to thousands of refugees who are desperate for food and medicine. More than 1,000 civilians have been killed in two months of fighting, which has forced hundreds of thousands of civilians to flee to the capital and caused critical shortages of food, water and medicine.
NEWS
July 23, 2003
A LEADING REBEL group's declaration of a cease-fire yesterday seemingly offers one last chance for Liberia. This truce, after days of fierce shelling, is a godsend that should be used to prevent that West African country from further self-destruction. Two things must now follow in short order to make the announced cease-fire stick: An international peacekeeping force -- mostly from neighboring West African countries but under the auspices of the United Nations and the United States -- must be quickly landed in Liberia to supervise the truce.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.