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By Alain Damiba and Alain Damiba,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2007
I grew up in the early 1960s in Burkina Faso, West Africa. Burkina Faso is a small, landlocked country with a population of less than 14 million, most of who are poor. Life expectancy for men and women is 48 years because of the lack of health care. This is especially the case for women who die during or after giving birth. As a young man, I remember hearing about women in my village who died during labor. Their deaths were not discussed publicly. All we were told was that it was God's will and that we should accept these tragic events as an inescapable part of life.
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NEWS
October 13, 2014
Federal Centers for Disease Control Director Thomas R. Frieden has been saying for weeks that Americans have little to fear from the deadly Ebola epidemic that has killed some 4,000 people in West Africa. But with news over the weekend that a nurse at the hospital in Texas where the first reported case of Ebola in the U.S. was treated has tested positive for the virus, even he now admits the nation may not be adequately prepared for an outbreak. Making sure that it is should be the CDC's top priority until we can be assured that what happened in Texas won't be repeated again elsewhere.
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NEWS
November 21, 1998
IF ONLY Stokely Carmichael had stayed in this country, we would all be the better for it. Known in later years as Kwame Toure, he will be best remembered for the most famous -- or infamous -- phrase in the civil rights lexicon, "black power." But his vision and ability extended far beyond words.His death at the age of 57 recalled the heady days of the movement of the 1960s, the tense and sometimes deadly challenges to the racist status quo in the South and rioting in the rest of the country.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Federal officials announced Wednesday that they plan to screen international passengers for Ebola at five major U.S. airports, while hospitals around the country continue to isolate patients showing Ebola-like symptoms. At least four Baltimore-area hospitals recently segregated patients with travel histories and other possible indications of Ebola, though the virus was ruled out in each case. Other cases were suspected and ruled out at two Washington-area hospitals last week. Meanwhile, the first U.S. patient diagnosed with the virus died Wednesday in Dallas.
TOPIC
By Leonard H. Robinson Jr | August 20, 2000
When Bill Clinton arrives in Nigeria on Friday, it will mark the first presidential visit to Africa's most populous nation since Jimmy Carter journeyed there in 1977. Using much the same logic that prompted the Nixon administration to initiate a serious dialogue with China, Clinton's advisers have concluded that Nigeria is simply too big to ignore. Nigeria has a population of 120 million to 130 million people and a wealth of national resources, including huge oil reserves. When Americans pull into a gas station and fill up their tanks, especially on the East Coast, the chances are that many of those gallons originated in Nigeria.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 14, 1996
MONROVIA, Liberia -- When times were good, a crowd always gathered for the incoming flights at Payne airport, a concrete building with a corrugated metal roof. The economy had long ago collapsed, but you might earn a dollar carrying the bag of someone going to Monrovia, the capital, a city without water or electricity or much hope for lasting peace.The good times, even as measured by the terribly low standards of West Africa, ended last week. A different crowd came to Payne, named for a freed 19th-century American slave who became one of Liberia's presidents.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 26, 1997
The Baga of West Africa are a small, unpowerful people. They number no more than 40,000 in all, and live in several groups of villages along a 100-mile stretch of Guinea's coast. They have never held major political power, and have been subjugated by others, both African and European. Not a people you would think important enough for outsiders to study.Except for their art. Over the centuries, they have created a body of art monumental in its proportions and more highly developed than that of much larger civilizations.
FEATURES
By Kerry Luft and Kerry Luft,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 21, 1996
SALVADOR, Brazil -- Tourists come to Salvador and surrounding Bahia state seeking the same things they find in much of the rest of Brazil -- idyllic beaches, a welcoming sun and an easygoing lifestyle set to a samba beat.But what they also find here is the most African of Brazilian cities, a place where the dress, the food, the music and even the religion hark back to West Africa.And increasingly, African-Americans are heading south to Salvador, seeking something that goes beyond a relaxing vacation -- a sense of kinship and a common heritage with the blacks of Brazil.
FEATURES
April 11, 2007
West Africa Performers share heritage If you want to hear the beat of the drum and learn the tradi tions of West Africa, go to the Randallstown library, 8604 Liberty Road, at 7 tonight, where Anansegromma of Gha na will share its heritage. Kwame Ansah-Brew is the mas ter drummer, dancer and actor, while Kofi Dennis is the artist and educator. Free. Call 410-887-0770.
NEWS
By Newport News Daily Press | April 9, 1992
NORFOLK, Va. -- A wet weather pattern expected to form soon in West Africa may trigger powerful hurricanes for two decades or more in coastal communities from Maine to Florida and along the Gulf of Mexico, say researchers.The weather pattern could bring a major hurricane every year to North America, as it did in the 1940s and 1950s, when heavy rains fell in West Africa, Colorado State University meteorologist William Gray said yesterday.From 1947 to 1969, during a period of wet weather in West Africa, 18 major hurricanes struck the Atlantic and Gulf coasts.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Officials at two Washington, D.C.-area hospitals said Friday they had isolated patients over fears of Ebola after the nation's first case of the deadly virus was confirmed in Dallas this week. But officials at one of the hospitals, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, determined late Friday that their patient had malaria, not Ebola, hospital officials said in a statement late Friday. Howard University Hospital quarantined a patient who had recently traveled to Nigeria out of "an abundance of caution," officials said.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
"This is not West Africa," Texas health commissioner Dr. David Lakey said Wednesday at a news conference designed to dispel Texans' (and Americans') fear of an Ebola outbreak after a man there was diagnosed with the disease. "This is a very sophisticated city, a very sophisticated hospital. " The subtext: All those gruesome photos you're seeing of people dying in the streets in West Africa — that's something that happens over there, to other people, not here, not to us. But what the events of the last few days have shown is that it's exactly that kind of hubris that puts us most at risk, and that for all the sophistication of the U.S. health system, it only takes a simple lapse to create the conditions for a broader outbreak.
HEALTH
Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
As health officials fail to contain West Africa's Ebola outbreak, recent scares at two Baltimore-area hospitals highlight the need for hospitals here and across the United States to prepare space and equipment for what some consider inevitable - the arrival of the deadly virus here. While experts say the chances of an epidemic spreading in the U.S. are low, there is a real possibility that someone could come down with Ebola after returning from a trip to Africa, they said. Hospitals routinely ask patients with flu-like symptoms whether they have visited that continent recently.
HEALTH
By Melissa Healy | August 28, 2014
The National Institutes of Health has announced the first clinical trial of a vaccine to protect healthy people from infection by the Ebola virus, which is responsible for an estimated 1,550 deaths throughout West Africa. NIH Director Francis Collins on Thursday called the human safety trials, which are to start next week in Bethesda, the latest in a series of the "extraordinary measures to accelerate the pace of vaccine clinical trials" for the public health emergency in Africa.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
Doris Ligon may be Baltimore born and bred, but she can't seem to get her mind off Africa. "I was in my 30s before I heard anything positive about Africa," recalls Ligon, 77, who, along with her late husband, Claude, opened the African Art Museum of Maryland in Columbia in 1980. Since 2011, the museum has held forth closer to Laurel, in cozy space in Maple Lawn, just off the lobby of the Baltimore-Washington Conference of the United Methodist Church. "In those days, it was called the Dark Continent.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | April 25, 2013
Malaria is an enormous and tragic problem - that can be beat. It takes the life of a child every minute in Sub-Saharan Africa, and a million people die from malaria each year. It also stifles economic development, as malaria prevents children from attending school and adults from working. Today is World Malaria Day, and I am pleased to celebrate the lives saved and enriched by recent attention and investments. Not that many years ago, this would be an occasion for hand-wringing and lamenting the many victims of this disease and wishing we could get the world to do more.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
A small New York-based airline that typically flies only chartered flights will launch a once-a-week flight to West Africa from Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport beginning June 4, the airline and airport said yesterday. North American Airlines, founded in 1989, has flown military and other charters from BWI. The airline was bought recently by World Air Holdings Inc., an Atlanta company that also operates air charters. North American will be the first carrier to offer service to West Africa from the airport since Air Ghana was grounded in 2004.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Officials at two Washington, D.C.-area hospitals said Friday they had isolated patients over fears of Ebola after the nation's first case of the deadly virus was confirmed in Dallas this week. But officials at one of the hospitals, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, determined late Friday that their patient had malaria, not Ebola, hospital officials said in a statement late Friday. Howard University Hospital quarantined a patient who had recently traveled to Nigeria out of "an abundance of caution," officials said.
EXPLORE
By Pete Pichaske | April 16, 2013
To Funlayo Alabi, Shea Radiance is much more than a business. It's a mission. Started in their Ellicott City home by Funlayo and her husband, Shola, Shea Radiance sells skin and hair products made from shea butter. Since the company's beginning eight years ago, business has doubled every year, and Shea Radiance products are now sold in hundreds of outlets, including some Target and Whole Foods stores. What makes the Columbia-based business more than a moneymaking venture, however, is that raw shea butter -- like Funlayo and Shola Alabi -- comes from West Africa, extracted from the nut of the African shea tree.
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