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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 23, 2002
SUN SCORE ***1/2 Undisputed is the best action film of the summer. Even though it has relatively few big action scenes and almost no special effects, it plays like one uninterrupted streak of action, because violence menaces the characters like a storm cloud when it isn't slicing through their milieu like lightning. The tale is simple: A heavyweight boxing champ named Iceman (Ving Rhames) lands in the slammer and discovers that the quickest way out is to fight the prison program's boxing champ, Monroe (Wesley Snipes)
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January 13, 2006
When Reapers feed on vampires, Blade (Wesley Snipes, above) forms an uneasy truce in Blade II (8 p.m.-10 p.m., TNT).
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January 13, 2006
When Reapers feed on vampires, Blade (Wesley Snipes, above) forms an uneasy truce in Blade II (8 p.m.-10 p.m., TNT).
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maisha Elonai and Maisha Elonai,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 2004
He's tough as nails and more lethal than the Nosferatu. He wears shades after dark and lives in the light. He's Blade, the death-dealing vampire hunter at the center of a third feature film, Blade: Trinity. And the surprise is, he's black - and he's a hit. Rare as it is to see an African-American character survive in an action/horror film at all, let alone as a champion of good, Blade's thirst for vengeance has captivated moviegoers worldwide. "What's cooler than a black superhero who's a vampire and can kick [butt]
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 22, 2002
Blade II is so witless it wins most of its laughs when Czech-speaking characters spout obscenities that get translated into English subtitles. How do you say "bomb" in Czechoslovakian? The sequel to the 1998 horror hit once again stars Wesley Snipes in stoic action-figure mode as the title character (derived from the hero of a Marvel comic). Vampires bit his mother when she was pregnant, so he's grown up with all the vampire strengths and one crucial vampire weakness - the need to drink blood.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Alisa Samuels is a reporter for The Evening Sun | April 17, 1991
DON'T believe the negative publicity surrounding "New Jack City."Go see it for yourself.When I saw it, people didn't erupt in violence, nor did they rush out to buy drugs.Instead, like any other good film, "New Jack City" entertains, informs and makes the audience think.It's a realistic movie about the world of a Harlem drug lord named Nino Brown (played magnificently by Wesley Snipes) and his cohorts.Brown is a ruthless, egotistical, greedy man who sucks the life out of his community. But in the end, the victimized community turns against Brown, who is arrested and unsuccessfully prosecuted.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 6, 1993
One movie, no matter how big it may be, does not a summer make. Especially this summer of '93.More than 60 other movies are being released between now and the end of August, almost a third more than usual. What that means for the moviegoer is that smaller films might not stick around very long, especially if the monster movies like "Jurassic" take over the screens.With that in mind, we offer this summer movie calendar of major releases to help you plan.June 11"Jurassic Park": The Tyrannosaurus rex of summer movies.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 18, 1997
How far we've come from the days when the president appeared in movies as the great white father, usually a presence so powerful and religious in meaning that, like Christ's, not even his face could be shown. In "Yankee Doodle Dandy," James Cagney's George M. Cohan stood as at Lourdes before the unseen radiance of FDR.Thus, while "Murder at 1600" is a little bit this side of OK as a movie, it is completely fascinating as a cultural artifact. That benevolent, theocratic force known as the commander-in-chief has been deconstructed by our impolite age to a whining, pitiful loser, frozen in the headlight-glare of onrushing catastrophe, indecisive, fretting and sniffling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maisha Elonai and Maisha Elonai,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 2004
He's tough as nails and more lethal than the Nosferatu. He wears shades after dark and lives in the light. He's Blade, the death-dealing vampire hunter at the center of a third feature film, Blade: Trinity. And the surprise is, he's black - and he's a hit. Rare as it is to see an African-American character survive in an action/horror film at all, let alone as a champion of good, Blade's thirst for vengeance has captivated moviegoers worldwide. "What's cooler than a black superhero who's a vampire and can kick [butt]
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 13, 1994
It's an ancient pattern: the gifted African-American writer who begins to feel the chafing of racism and the despair in his community a little too acutely against his skin. Each day becomes a little misery. He knows: I'll die if I stay here. Or, the same thing: I'll never write again if I stay here. So he goes into exile.Paris, usually. Richard Wright went to Paris. Chester Himes went to Paris. James Baldwin went to Paris.Barry Michael Cooper went to Baltimore.In Baltimore he found what had died in the Harlem that nurtured him: a community.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 23, 2002
SUN SCORE ***1/2 Undisputed is the best action film of the summer. Even though it has relatively few big action scenes and almost no special effects, it plays like one uninterrupted streak of action, because violence menaces the characters like a storm cloud when it isn't slicing through their milieu like lightning. The tale is simple: A heavyweight boxing champ named Iceman (Ving Rhames) lands in the slammer and discovers that the quickest way out is to fight the prison program's boxing champ, Monroe (Wesley Snipes)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 22, 2002
Blade II is so witless it wins most of its laughs when Czech-speaking characters spout obscenities that get translated into English subtitles. How do you say "bomb" in Czechoslovakian? The sequel to the 1998 horror hit once again stars Wesley Snipes in stoic action-figure mode as the title character (derived from the hero of a Marvel comic). Vampires bit his mother when she was pregnant, so he's grown up with all the vampire strengths and one crucial vampire weakness - the need to drink blood.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 18, 1997
How far we've come from the days when the president appeared in movies as the great white father, usually a presence so powerful and religious in meaning that, like Christ's, not even his face could be shown. In "Yankee Doodle Dandy," James Cagney's George M. Cohan stood as at Lourdes before the unseen radiance of FDR.Thus, while "Murder at 1600" is a little bit this side of OK as a movie, it is completely fascinating as a cultural artifact. That benevolent, theocratic force known as the commander-in-chief has been deconstructed by our impolite age to a whining, pitiful loser, frozen in the headlight-glare of onrushing catastrophe, indecisive, fretting and sniffling.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 13, 1994
It's an ancient pattern: the gifted African-American writer who begins to feel the chafing of racism and the despair in his community a little too acutely against his skin. Each day becomes a little misery. He knows: I'll die if I stay here. Or, the same thing: I'll never write again if I stay here. So he goes into exile.Paris, usually. Richard Wright went to Paris. Chester Himes went to Paris. James Baldwin went to Paris.Barry Michael Cooper went to Baltimore.In Baltimore he found what had died in the Harlem that nurtured him: a community.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 30, 1993
THE AGE OF INNOCENCE is Martin Scorsese's sumptuous take on the Edith Wharton novel, with a stellar cast including Michelle Pfeiffer, Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder. All three are excellent in a muted patrician drama about a young man who, engaged to the right woman, falls in love with the wrong woman. Society decides this cannot be, and moves swiftly to end the apostasy. *** 1/2 . PG-13.THE BEVERLY HILLBILLIES is an amiable tribute to the old '60s TV show, re-creating the spirit of the original with amazing fidelity.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 6, 1993
One movie, no matter how big it may be, does not a summer make. Especially this summer of '93.More than 60 other movies are being released between now and the end of August, almost a third more than usual. What that means for the moviegoer is that smaller films might not stick around very long, especially if the monster movies like "Jurassic" take over the screens.With that in mind, we offer this summer movie calendar of major releases to help you plan.June 11"Jurassic Park": The Tyrannosaurus rex of summer movies.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 30, 1993
THE AGE OF INNOCENCE is Martin Scorsese's sumptuous take on the Edith Wharton novel, with a stellar cast including Michelle Pfeiffer, Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder. All three are excellent in a muted patrician drama about a young man who, engaged to the right woman, falls in love with the wrong woman. Society decides this cannot be, and moves swiftly to end the apostasy. *** 1/2 . PG-13.THE BEVERLY HILLBILLIES is an amiable tribute to the old '60s TV show, re-creating the spirit of the original with amazing fidelity.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 28, 1992
When an interviewer stumbles, Neal Jimenez is merciful."Let me help you," he'll say and neatly answer the question you were groping toward, somehow unable to fit the words into proper order.The words usually are among the most frightening in the language and among the most difficult to confront directly: Crippled. Paralyzed. Wheelchair.He discusses them casually. He laughs about them."It just seems so matter of fact to me," he says.The words he doesn't want to hear are: Heroic. Courageous.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 28, 1992
When an interviewer stumbles, Neal Jimenez is merciful."Let me help you," he'll say and neatly answer the question you were groping toward, somehow unable to fit the words into proper order.The words usually are among the most frightening in the language and among the most difficult to confront directly: Crippled. Paralyzed. Wheelchair.He discusses them casually. He laughs about them."It just seems so matter of fact to me," he says.The words he doesn't want to hear are: Heroic. Courageous.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Alisa Samuels is a reporter for The Evening Sun | April 17, 1991
DON'T believe the negative publicity surrounding "New Jack City."Go see it for yourself.When I saw it, people didn't erupt in violence, nor did they rush out to buy drugs.Instead, like any other good film, "New Jack City" entertains, informs and makes the audience think.It's a realistic movie about the world of a Harlem drug lord named Nino Brown (played magnificently by Wesley Snipes) and his cohorts.Brown is a ruthless, egotistical, greedy man who sucks the life out of his community. But in the end, the victimized community turns against Brown, who is arrested and unsuccessfully prosecuted.
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