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By Steve Chapman | September 26, 2003
CHICAGO - Wesley K. Clark is a presidential candidate whose campaign rests on two rationales: his soldier's biography and his opposition to the war in Iraq. His biography is still intact, but within 24 hours of entering the race, the retired general had managed to turn the Iraq issue into his own personal exploding cigar. For those of us who are generally skeptical about plunging into optional wars, that's not the only reason to wonder if Mr. Clark offers a real alternative to the incumbent.
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NEWS
September 16, 2007
WORLD Sunnis loyal to U.S. threatened An al-Qaida front group threatened to assassinate Sunni leaders who support American troops in Iraq as a Shiite bloc loyal to radical cleric Muqtada al-Sadr defected yesterday from the Iraqi government's parliament base. pg 27a Musharraf's re-election assured Pakistan's ruling party assured President Gen. Pervez Musharraf yesterday that he would be elected to a new five-year term in October before exiled opposition leader Benazir Bhutto returns to the country.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2003
In what supporters consider a strong signal that he will enter the race for president, retired Army General Wesley K. Clark has called a core group of political advisers to Little Rock, Ark., today to discuss strategy for a possible Democratic campaign. "It's a discussion about his decision, and he didn't say what his decision is," said George Bruno, a former New Hampshire Democratic chairman and ambassador to Belize, who is to attend the meeting. Bruno said he was invited to the meeting yesterday morning and last spoke with Clark by telephone Friday.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 14, 2007
Bank robbers rarely use suicide bombers. Forgers don't declare war on capitalism, democracy and modernity. Kidnappers rarely behead their victims without asking for a ransom. And when they do ask for ransoms, only rarely do they demand that infidels submit to the will of Allah instead of asking for unmarked bills. These incandescently obvious observations illuminate, in a small way, the resplendent stupidity of the notion that we should treat members of al-Qaida like run-of-the-mill criminals.
NEWS
September 16, 2007
WORLD Sunnis loyal to U.S. threatened An al-Qaida front group threatened to assassinate Sunni leaders who support American troops in Iraq as a Shiite bloc loyal to radical cleric Muqtada al-Sadr defected yesterday from the Iraqi government's parliament base. pg 27a Musharraf's re-election assured Pakistan's ruling party assured President Gen. Pervez Musharraf yesterday that he would be elected to a new five-year term in October before exiled opposition leader Benazir Bhutto returns to the country.
NEWS
By Paul West | June 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - With their largest field of presidential contenders in years, Democrats don't seem to be hurting for additional candidates eager to take on President Bush next year. Nine men and women are already competing for what will likely be an uphill fight against a richly funded incumbent. But that isn't stopping Delaware Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. and retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark from hinting that they might run. In addition, a quiet effort is under way to draft Al Gore into the race.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- NATO Supreme Commander Gen. Wesley Clark, architect of the allied victory in the Kosovo conflict, will leave his post three months ahead of schedule to accommodate the promotion of Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston as his replacement, the White House said yesterday.Ralston, a favorite of Defense Secretary William S. Cohen, had withdrawn from contention for the top job of chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff two years ago after admitting to an extramarital affair.White House spokesman Joe Lockhart strongly denied reports that Clark's early departure signified any reproach of the four-star U.S. Army general, who urged a more aggressive policy against Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic than his superiors in the Pentagon and administration at first desired.
NEWS
By Mark Z. Barabak and Mark Z. Barabak,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 10, 2003
PHOENIX - Wesley Clark and Howard Dean, the two candidates leading most Democratic preference polls, came under sharp attack last night from presidential rivals who challenged their loyalty to the party and its principles. The war in Iraq - a perpetual divide in the Democratic contest - also dominated much of the discussion, as nine White House hopefuls shared a stage for 90 minutes of vigorous jousting that saw them needle each other nearly as much as they needled President Bush. Clark, the retired Army general, came under the sharpest fire since he entered the race less then a month ago, with Dean launching the first attack.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the hotel corridor outside a meeting of the New Democrat Network the other day, retired Gen. Wesley Clark, as slim and erect in a dark blue suit as he was in his four-starred uniform, chatted easily as he awaited his turn to address the pointedly partisan group. I asked the former supreme NATO commander and leader of U.S. forces in Kosovo whether his appearance was a tip-off on his party affiliation, which so far he has resolutely declined to declare in so many words. He smiled and said benignly, "I'm just here to give my ideas."
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 14, 2007
Bank robbers rarely use suicide bombers. Forgers don't declare war on capitalism, democracy and modernity. Kidnappers rarely behead their victims without asking for a ransom. And when they do ask for ransoms, only rarely do they demand that infidels submit to the will of Allah instead of asking for unmarked bills. These incandescently obvious observations illuminate, in a small way, the resplendent stupidity of the notion that we should treat members of al-Qaida like run-of-the-mill criminals.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2006
After a bruising and expensive primary match-up in September, state Sen. John A. Giannetti Jr. and James C. Rosapepe are back at it in a race for the District 21 seat. Their positions are the same, but this time, their parties are different. Giannetti, who was defeated resoundingly in the Democratic primary last month, is now seeking the seat as a Republican, following the withdrawal of the GOP nominee. The freshman senator lost the support of two Democratic delegates from District 21 after siding on several high-profile issues with Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. But Giannetti blames his Democratic primary loss on low voter turnout, the predominance of "partisan and activist members of the party" at the polls, and what he called Rosapepe's "swift boat" style of campaigning.
NEWS
By Mark Z. Barabak and Mark Z. Barabak,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 10, 2003
PHOENIX - Wesley Clark and Howard Dean, the two candidates leading most Democratic preference polls, came under sharp attack last night from presidential rivals who challenged their loyalty to the party and its principles. The war in Iraq - a perpetual divide in the Democratic contest - also dominated much of the discussion, as nine White House hopefuls shared a stage for 90 minutes of vigorous jousting that saw them needle each other nearly as much as they needled President Bush. Clark, the retired Army general, came under the sharpest fire since he entered the race less then a month ago, with Dean launching the first attack.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - The closest thing yet to a face-off between former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean and retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark for support of anti-war Democrats came here the other day at a meeting of the Democratic National Committee at which all 10 of the candidates for the party's 2004 presidential nominees displayed their oratorical wares. Mr. Dean was his customary bombastic self, hammering President Bush on the fluctuating rationales for invading Iraq and declaring that "as commander in chief, I will never send Americans to fight in a foreign land without telling the truth about why they're fighting there."
NEWS
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2003
Up in the celestial precincts where the buck stops somewhat higher than the U.S. presidency, Harry S. Truman must be ruminating over Gen. Wesley K. Clark's decision to run for the White House. Ruminating? That might be too neutral a word for the scrappy man from Missouri. As was the case about most things in the universe, Truman had strong feelings about generals and especially generals adventurous enough to puff themselves into politics. But as a guy who liked to shoot fast from the hip, our 29th president had his contradictions - some of them quite vivid.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | September 26, 2003
CHICAGO - Wesley K. Clark is a presidential candidate whose campaign rests on two rationales: his soldier's biography and his opposition to the war in Iraq. His biography is still intact, but within 24 hours of entering the race, the retired general had managed to turn the Iraq issue into his own personal exploding cigar. For those of us who are generally skeptical about plunging into optional wars, that's not the only reason to wonder if Mr. Clark offers a real alternative to the incumbent.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2003
In what supporters consider a strong signal that he will enter the race for president, retired Army General Wesley K. Clark has called a core group of political advisers to Little Rock, Ark., today to discuss strategy for a possible Democratic campaign. "It's a discussion about his decision, and he didn't say what his decision is," said George Bruno, a former New Hampshire Democratic chairman and ambassador to Belize, who is to attend the meeting. Bruno said he was invited to the meeting yesterday morning and last spoke with Clark by telephone Friday.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2006
After a bruising and expensive primary match-up in September, state Sen. John A. Giannetti Jr. and James C. Rosapepe are back at it in a race for the District 21 seat. Their positions are the same, but this time, their parties are different. Giannetti, who was defeated resoundingly in the Democratic primary last month, is now seeking the seat as a Republican, following the withdrawal of the GOP nominee. The freshman senator lost the support of two Democratic delegates from District 21 after siding on several high-profile issues with Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. But Giannetti blames his Democratic primary loss on low voter turnout, the predominance of "partisan and activist members of the party" at the polls, and what he called Rosapepe's "swift boat" style of campaigning.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - The closest thing yet to a face-off between former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean and retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark for support of anti-war Democrats came here the other day at a meeting of the Democratic National Committee at which all 10 of the candidates for the party's 2004 presidential nominees displayed their oratorical wares. Mr. Dean was his customary bombastic self, hammering President Bush on the fluctuating rationales for invading Iraq and declaring that "as commander in chief, I will never send Americans to fight in a foreign land without telling the truth about why they're fighting there."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the hotel corridor outside a meeting of the New Democrat Network the other day, retired Gen. Wesley Clark, as slim and erect in a dark blue suit as he was in his four-starred uniform, chatted easily as he awaited his turn to address the pointedly partisan group. I asked the former supreme NATO commander and leader of U.S. forces in Kosovo whether his appearance was a tip-off on his party affiliation, which so far he has resolutely declined to declare in so many words. He smiled and said benignly, "I'm just here to give my ideas."
NEWS
By Paul West | June 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - With their largest field of presidential contenders in years, Democrats don't seem to be hurting for additional candidates eager to take on President Bush next year. Nine men and women are already competing for what will likely be an uphill fight against a richly funded incumbent. But that isn't stopping Delaware Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. and retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark from hinting that they might run. In addition, a quiet effort is under way to draft Al Gore into the race.
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