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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
No other director has left his name on as many horror-movie touchstones as Wes Craven. From "The Last House on the Left" (1972) and "The Hills Have Eyes" (1977) to "A Nightmare on Elm Street" (1984) and "Scream" (1996), his American nightmares have spawned scores of film or TV follow-ups, spin-offs or remakes. His movies have engaged fresh crowds of collegiate audiences with each new filmgoing generation. His career is based on experiments in terror — the kind of filmmaking you'd think would come from "movie brats" who spent their youth hopping from theater to theater, in search of the next primal scream.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
No other director has left his name on as many horror-movie touchstones as Wes Craven. From "The Last House on the Left" (1972) and "The Hills Have Eyes" (1977) to "A Nightmare on Elm Street" (1984) and "Scream" (1996), his American nightmares have spawned scores of film or TV follow-ups, spin-offs or remakes. His movies have engaged fresh crowds of collegiate audiences with each new filmgoing generation. His career is based on experiments in terror — the kind of filmmaking you'd think would come from "movie brats" who spent their youth hopping from theater to theater, in search of the next primal scream.
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NEWS
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Hartford (Conn.)Courant | March 18, 2007
NEW YORK -- There is nowhere to run, and this is no Wes Craven movie. Craven is aware that his fans upstairs at the New York Comic Con would chase him like a slasher after a busty virgin if they saw him. "It's exciting that there's an audience out there," says Craven, at the comics and fantasy convention to promote The Hills Have Eyes 2, opening Friday. "There are not that many genres out there where the audience follows filmmakers. It means that the genre's very vital and speaking specifically to the audience."
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 13, 2009
Vengeance porn meets the torture flick in The Last House on the Left, a new version of Wes Craven's vile 1972 cult horror movie that itself was a rank vulgarization of Ingmar Bergman's 1960 Oscar winner The Virgin Spring. It's a gore sundae with an S&M cherry on top. Before the stunned eyes of his son (Spencer Treat Clark), a vicious killer (Garret Dillahunt), his sociopathic babe (Riki Lindhome) and his psycho brother (Aaron Paul) kidnap and assault two nubile teens (Sara Paxton and Martha MacIsaac)
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 26, 2005
You can't go home again. Or in the case of reunited director Wes Craven and screenwriter Kevin Williamson, you can't Scream again. In Cursed, they made a werewolf movie and it was so messed up, they reshot half of it. They fiddled with it for more than a year, trying to recapture the magic of their Scream teaming. Christina Ricci plays a young producer with TV's Late Late Show with Craig Kilborn. She's giving up on trying to talk hot club-designer Jake (Joshua Jackson) into a commitment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 14, 1994
Onward, pagan soldiers!The latest Freddy Krueger film, "Wes Craven's New Nightmare," has arrived, with a much purer pedigree than any Freddy since the original "Nightmare on Elm Street." That's because the original was created by Craven, a horror auteur, and then passed on to mere mortals while he tried to make a mark in mainstream films, such as "The Serpent and the Rainbow." Now he and his original creation have reunited, around a particularly nasty, devilish idea.Others in that first film return as well: Heather Langenkamp, the original Nancy, as well as John Saxon, who played her father.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
Fox had a good year, and the changes will be minor. UPN, meanwhile, is in trouble, and an overhaul is under way.That's the news as the last two networks rolled out their fall schedules for advertisers yesterday.Fox will add four sitcoms and two dramas to the fall schedule, as well as moving "King of the Hill" from Sunday to Tuesday at 8 p.m.The new Fox sitcoms include "Costello," starring Sue Costello as a young working-class woman in a blue-collar neighborhood of Boston."Feelin' All Right" promises a return to the 1970s.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
The Maryland Film Festival kicked off its fall tour yesterday with a screening of Paul Zinder's documentary "Mom Mom Loves Herbert" and Elizabeth Holder's short film "Weekend Getaway" at the Slayton House Theatre in Columbia. Tonight, the show will come to the Weinberg Center in Frederick. The tour will resume Monday with a date at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis and end Tuesday in Easton at the Avalon Theater. Show times are at 7: 30 p.m. For more information, visit the festival's Web site at www.mdfilmfest.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 13, 2009
Vengeance porn meets the torture flick in The Last House on the Left, a new version of Wes Craven's vile 1972 cult horror movie that itself was a rank vulgarization of Ingmar Bergman's 1960 Oscar winner The Virgin Spring. It's a gore sundae with an S&M cherry on top. Before the stunned eyes of his son (Spencer Treat Clark), a vicious killer (Garret Dillahunt), his sociopathic babe (Riki Lindhome) and his psycho brother (Aaron Paul) kidnap and assault two nubile teens (Sara Paxton and Martha MacIsaac)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 2, 1991
"The People Under the Stairs" is your average comedy about child abuse, mutilation and murder. It's a yecch! a minute.Written and directed by Wes Craven in strokes so broad he could have used lipstick on a mirror, it plays off archetypal fears of dark places in old houses. In the sense that it tries to be primal, it is sometimes effective; in the sense that it tries to be entertaining, it's complete drivel.It might also be regarded as Universal's pre-emptive strike on Paramount's upcoming "The Addams Family," because the comic-macabre elements seem of a piece with the same broad tone in the Paramount film.
NEWS
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Hartford (Conn.)Courant | March 18, 2007
NEW YORK -- There is nowhere to run, and this is no Wes Craven movie. Craven is aware that his fans upstairs at the New York Comic Con would chase him like a slasher after a busty virgin if they saw him. "It's exciting that there's an audience out there," says Craven, at the comics and fantasy convention to promote The Hills Have Eyes 2, opening Friday. "There are not that many genres out there where the audience follows filmmakers. It means that the genre's very vital and speaking specifically to the audience."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 19, 2005
Red Eye, with Rachel McAdams as a reluctant airline passenger who probably should have stayed on the ground, is a welcome antidote to the bloated, overthought and oversold studio pictures that have been drawing a collective yawn from audiences this summer. It's a taut thriller with a strong character at its core and a despicable villain there to torment her every step of the way, a crowd-pleaser in all the best senses of the term. Director Wes Craven, working with first-time screenwriter Carl Ellsworth, wastes not a single moment in telling the story of Lisa Reisart, the manager of a high-priced Miami hotel, who is forced to take a red-eye flight back home after attending the funeral of her grandmother.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 26, 2005
You can't go home again. Or in the case of reunited director Wes Craven and screenwriter Kevin Williamson, you can't Scream again. In Cursed, they made a werewolf movie and it was so messed up, they reshot half of it. They fiddled with it for more than a year, trying to recapture the magic of their Scream teaming. Christina Ricci plays a young producer with TV's Late Late Show with Craig Kilborn. She's giving up on trying to talk hot club-designer Jake (Joshua Jackson) into a commitment.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 4, 2000
OK, it's over, can we all go back to our lives now? It seems like just yesterday that "Scream," Wes Craven's wittily self-referential take on the teen slasher movies of the 1970s and 1980s, was becoming a sleeper hit. One just-as-good sequel later we seem to have come to the end of the line, and not a moment too soon. In addition to several other elements -- including funny scripts, an appealing cast of young players and some genuinely scary moments -- the "Scream" franchise is that rare bird in Hollywood that actually knows when to call it quits.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 28, 1999
The year might not have been as stellar on a national scale as it was on the local level, but average filmgoers -- who see between six and eight movies a year -- still had enough decent movies to keep them satisfied throughout the 12 months. As usual, the Christmas season has been top-loaded with long, literary films trying to qualify for the Oscars, but there were some nifty ones that came out in the spring and summer, too. A note about rules: The 1998 Top 10 list only included movies that had opened in Baltimore, but this year we're changing the qualifications to account for movies that will open here within the next few weeks.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
The Maryland Film Festival kicked off its fall tour yesterday with a screening of Paul Zinder's documentary "Mom Mom Loves Herbert" and Elizabeth Holder's short film "Weekend Getaway" at the Slayton House Theatre in Columbia. Tonight, the show will come to the Weinberg Center in Frederick. The tour will resume Monday with a date at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis and end Tuesday in Easton at the Avalon Theater. Show times are at 7: 30 p.m. For more information, visit the festival's Web site at www.mdfilmfest.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 20, 1996
Indeed, "Scream" is better than the average slasher film, as its advertisers insist. And, indeed, it is probably Wes Craven's best film, as they also insist. But that is a little like saying the pimple on the left side of your nose is "better" than the pimple on the right side. Or that the 1995 audit was "better" than the 1994 audit. Or that Yogi is merely "better" than the average bear.Mostly, it's the same old things: goblins in masks chasing teen-agers and the occasional grown-up through time and space without regard to logic, catching them and doing the dirty deed with six inches of cold steel.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 4, 2000
OK, it's over, can we all go back to our lives now? It seems like just yesterday that "Scream," Wes Craven's wittily self-referential take on the teen slasher movies of the 1970s and 1980s, was becoming a sleeper hit. One just-as-good sequel later we seem to have come to the end of the line, and not a moment too soon. In addition to several other elements -- including funny scripts, an appealing cast of young players and some genuinely scary moments -- the "Scream" franchise is that rare bird in Hollywood that actually knows when to call it quits.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
Fox had a good year, and the changes will be minor. UPN, meanwhile, is in trouble, and an overhaul is under way.That's the news as the last two networks rolled out their fall schedules for advertisers yesterday.Fox will add four sitcoms and two dramas to the fall schedule, as well as moving "King of the Hill" from Sunday to Tuesday at 8 p.m.The new Fox sitcoms include "Costello," starring Sue Costello as a young working-class woman in a blue-collar neighborhood of Boston."Feelin' All Right" promises a return to the 1970s.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 20, 1996
Indeed, "Scream" is better than the average slasher film, as its advertisers insist. And, indeed, it is probably Wes Craven's best film, as they also insist. But that is a little like saying the pimple on the left side of your nose is "better" than the pimple on the right side. Or that the 1995 audit was "better" than the 1994 audit. Or that Yogi is merely "better" than the average bear.Mostly, it's the same old things: goblins in masks chasing teen-agers and the occasional grown-up through time and space without regard to logic, catching them and doing the dirty deed with six inches of cold steel.
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