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By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1997
ATLANTA -- The Orioles wasted no time agreeing to terms yesterday with the first of their two first-round draft choices, signing high school catcher Jayson Werth to a deal worth $850,000 to $900,000.Werth, the 22nd overall pick of the draft, was not expected to be difficult to sign. The Orioles are still pursuing their second first-round pick, Colorado two-sport star Darnell McDonald, who already has rejected an opening bid of $2 million. Unlike McDonald, Werth had made no secret of wanting to join the Orioles though he had signed a scholarship to attend the University of Georgia.
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By Adam Kilgore and The Washington Post | May 4, 2011
The first boos cascaded from the Citizens Bank Ballpark stands as Jayson Werth stepped out of the on-deck circle, not knowing what to expect, ready for his first at-bat here as a Washington National. They continued, louder and louder, coming from Philadelphia Phillies fans who held aloft signs that read "$tiff" and "Welcome Back Loser" and "I only came to boo Jayson. " By late Tuesday night, when Werth's old team had again asserted its superiority over his new one, this time with a 4-1 victory, Werth and, surprisingly, Phillies fans had shown their appreciation for one another.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2000
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Within the swirl of intrigue and hurt feelings involving catcher Charles Johnson and Orioles management, plopped down in the middle of a potential storm of controversy stands a skinny 20-year-old who must wonder how he got there. Bitter at having to go to arbitration over a $500,000 difference in salary offers, Johnson has stated this probably will be his last season with the Orioles. A pending free agent seeking a five-year deal, he's been stiff-armed by vice president of baseball operations Syd Thrift, who seems to prefer giving former first-round draft pick Jayson Werth a clearer path to the majors even if it means pushing aside a player the organization had coveted last winter.
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December 7, 2010
Money the clear choice Steve Gould Baltimore Sun Of course Jayson Werth should have taken the Nationals' money. First, he's 31 years old. He knew going in that whatever contract he signed — even if it weren't for the seven years they gave him — could be the last of his career. Even if he had signed for four years, there's no telling what would be out there when he's 35 and his production has, in all likelihood, slipped. Also, it's not as if we're talking about some hard-luck loser who has never sniffed the postseason.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
FREDERICK -- Last season, the big names, Ryan Minor and Calvin Pickering included, bypassed Frederick on the Orioles' farm-system ladder and went directly from lower Single-A to the Double-A level.This time, the Keys have landed the marquee players.Pitching phenom Matt Riley and first-rounder draft picks Jayson Werth and Darnell McDonald will play in the Carolina League and form the nucleus of a Frederick team that has the ingredients to be the city's best in a decade."Potentially, this club could be real good," said former Orioles catcher and new manager Andy Etchebarren.
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By Brant James and Brant James,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | August 5, 1997
Jayson Werth was eager to get his professional baseball career started after he was chosen by the Orioles in the first round of the June amateur draft. The catcher signed quickly, for a modest bonus in this age of extravagant high-round contracts, passed on a full college scholarship and reported on time to camp in Sarasota, Fla.A player who sets high goals for himself, Werth has hit an early -- albeit minor -- snag in the Gulf Coast League, however.Sidelined for 20 of Sarasota's first 40 games because of recurrent back spasms, Werth, 18, is playing through medical problems for the first time.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1999
If you want a spectacular rise through the Orioles' farm system, see pitchers Rocky Coppinger and Matt Riley.If you want a steady ascent toward the major leagues, see catcher Jayson Werth.The Orioles didn't have much fortune in the 1999 summer draft with finding catchers, but they didn't really need it because of talents such as Werth, their No. 1 pick two years ago who is making notable progress."He's getting better," said Single-A Frederick Keys manager Andy Etchebarren, the last player to come through the Orioles' chain and become the longtime starting catcher in Baltimore.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1998
His lineage includes former big-league infielders Dick Schofield Jr. and Sr., his uncle and grandfather, and Dennis Werth, his stepfather, who played for the New York Yankees and Kansas City Royals.But Delmarva Shorebirds catcher Jayson Werth first learned baseball skills from his mother."When I was a little kid, she always had me outside hitting tennis balls, using a bat or something," said the 1997 first-round Orioles draftee. "Later, it was my stepfather who worked with me, got me on the right track."
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
Busy trying to prove himself at the major-league level, Jayson Werth doesn't have time to worry about proving the Orioles wrong. Werth finally made it to Camden Yards on Monday, but not with the team that drafted him. Part of the Toronto Blue Jays' expanded roster, Werth played left field for the last three innings of Tuesday's 10-4 victory and struck out in his only at-bat. Those swings were supposed to come with the Orioles, who chose him in the first round of the 1997 draft. But they traded Werth to the Blue Jays at the 2000 winter meetings, receiving pitcher John Bale in return.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Joe Strauss contributed to this article | June 4, 1997
A lack of depth among position players is considered the weakest link in the Orioles' farm system, but yesterday's draft may have changed all that.With their strongest positioning in nine years, the Orioles drafted two solid athletes in the first round, then took a flyer on a virtual unknown with their supplemental pick, the 36th overall.At their assigned spot of No. 22, they chose catcher Jayson Werth of Glenwood High School in Chatham, Ill., and with No. 26 (compensation for the New York Yankees' free-agent signing of David Wells)
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By Phil Rogers | December 6, 2010
ORLANDO, Fla. — Raise your hand if you saw this one coming. Jayson Werth is leaving the powerful Phillies for the Nationals, taking the highest offer even though it came from a perennial doormat. Agent Scott Boras got Werth the huge contract he was searching for — reportedly a seven-year, $126 million deal that topped offers from contenders, including the Red Sox, Tigers and Phillies. It's unclear how much more the Nationals bid than any other team, but the Red Sox's offer was reportedly only for four years.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
Late Orioles game: Last night's game between the Orioles and Dodgers in Los Angeles ended too late to be included in this edition. A complete report can be found in later editions or on the Internet at www.baltimoresun.com. LOS ANGELES - On the crushing blow that spoiled Orioles rookie Matt Riley's return to the big leagues Wednesday night, Los Angeles Dodgers left fielder Jayson Werth swung the bat as if he knew exactly what was coming. In a way, he did. Werth was a first-round draft pick by the Orioles in 1997 and came up through the system as a catcher.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
LOS ANGELES - The Orioles are teetering on the brink of last place now, staring up in the standings at the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, and every game seems to bring another vivid snapshot of their frustration. Last night against the Los Angeles Dodgers, rookie left-hander Matt Riley slammed his pitching hand into the infield grass, just before the real pain came. And a lineup full of slumping hitters kept walking back to the dugout, heads pointed straight down, after flailing away against Odalis Perez.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
LOS ANGELES - The Orioles are teetering on the brink of last place now, and every game seems to bring another vivid snapshot of their frustration. Last night against the Los Angeles Dodgers, rookie left-hander Matt Riley slammed his pitching hand into the infield grass, just before the real pain came. And a lineup full of slumping hitters kept walking back to the dugout, heads pointed straight down, after flailing away against Odalis Perez. The worst stretch of the season grew a little worse, as the Dodgers got a three-run homer from former Orioles prospect Jayson Werth and held on for a 6-3 victory at Dodger Stadium.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
Busy trying to prove himself at the major-league level, Jayson Werth doesn't have time to worry about proving the Orioles wrong. Werth finally made it to Camden Yards on Monday, but not with the team that drafted him. Part of the Toronto Blue Jays' expanded roster, Werth played left field for the last three innings of Tuesday's 10-4 victory and struck out in his only at-bat. Those swings were supposed to come with the Orioles, who chose him in the first round of the 1997 draft. But they traded Werth to the Blue Jays at the 2000 winter meetings, receiving pitcher John Bale in return.
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By Liz Szabo and Liz Szabo,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 27, 2001
NORFOLK, Va. - At age 78, Murrell Werth has had seven operations and has been hospitalized many times over the years. Lately she's noticed a disturbing trend. Nurses seem so busy and overworked that they don't have time to help her with basic needs like making up the bed or getting a glass of water. One time, she rang her call button for 2 1/2 hours to no avail. So now, when Werth needs to stay overnight at the hospital, she tries something different: She brings her own nurse. Werth is one of a small but growing number of patients in Virginia's Hampton Roads region helping to fuel a resurgence in the use of private-duty nurses.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2000
Forget the thought about one of the Orioles' prime prospects moving to the outfield. Jayson Werth is a catcher, period. "Don't even think about a shift," said his manager at Bowie and current catching mentor, Andy Etchebarren. "No one has given up on him becoming a big-league catcher. I don't ever think he'll throw to second in 1.9 [seconds). But he'll be around 2.0 and that's good enough if he 's accurate with his throws." Said Werth: "A catcher is what I've always wanted to be. If I keep on progressing, I should be able to do it. I've only played in the outfield seven games in my whole life.
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By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2000
Orioles majority owner Peter Angelos has initiated talks regarding a contract extension with pitcher Mike Mussina but has adopted a wait-and-see approach in dealing with Gold Glove catcher Charles Johnson, who like Mussina is eligible for free agency after the 2000 season. While Angelos hopes to sign the team's right-handed ace to a deal extending at least through 2005, vice president of baseball operations Syd Thrift acknowledged "we don't have a game plan yet" on how to proceed with Johnson, largely because of a preference to begin deploying talent from the minor-league system, such as catching prospect Jayson Werth.
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By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2000
DALLAS - The Orioles extended their role as minor players within these winter meetings yesterday, but acquired two minor-league talents who may facilitate more significant deals, perhaps within the next three days. Unable to create momentum for a trade with the Montreal Expos for either pitcher Dustin Hermanson or shortstop Orlando Cabrera, Orioles vice president of baseball operations Syd Thrift is prepared to redirect his focus to a possible trade for Oakland Athletics pitcher Omar Olivares while redoubling his pursuit of free-agent shortstop Mike Bordick.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2000
Forget the thought about one of the Orioles' prime prospects moving to the outfield. Jayson Werth is a catcher, period. "Don't even think about a shift," said his manager at Bowie and current catching mentor, Andy Etchebarren. "No one has given up on him becoming a big-league catcher. I don't ever think he'll throw to second in 1.9 [seconds). But he'll be around 2.0 and that's good enough if he 's accurate with his throws." Said Werth: "A catcher is what I've always wanted to be. If I keep on progressing, I should be able to do it. I've only played in the outfield seven games in my whole life.
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