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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 8, 2001
Werner Herzog hesitates only a moment before deciding on a suitable inscription. "Every man for himself," he writes in thick black Magic Marker, "and God against all." The inscription is the title of perhaps his most ingratiating work, a film released in this country as The Mystery of Kaspar Hauser, the tale of a strange adolescent found wandering the streets of Nuremberg in 1828, illiterate and not even knowing how to speak. It's one of Herzog's most touching works. Why, he's asked, did he choose that quote?
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By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 25, 2008
Werner Herzog is a magnet for obsessives, and his lovely new film, Encounters at the End of the World, takes you places an ordinary documentary filmmaker might've gone to yet missed completely. At the invitation of the National Science Foundation, Herzog traveled to McMurdo Station in Antarctica, a U.S.-run enclave of 1,100 men and women who study the physical environment. We spend time with ecologists, biologists and survival-school instructors who teach people how not to get lost in a blinding snowstorm.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 3, 1996
An opera about the Amazon needs Werner Herzog.After all, the German film director spent four years there making his most famous movie, "Fitzcarraldo," which is about the Sisyphean complications that ensue from its hero's obsession with bringing Enrico Caruso to sing in the jungle.What's more, Herzog himself loves working in opera houses."Living and breathing music for four weeks is like going to Hawaii for me," says the director, 54, a slim, balding man, whose calm, unruffled manner belies his reputation for driving himself and those working for him to extremes in order to achieve intensity in his movies.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | July 27, 2007
If Dieter Dengler hadn't already existed, he would be exactly the sort of character who might have sprung from the fertile imagination of Werner Herzog. Shot down over Laos in 1966, the German-born U.S. fighter pilot endured months in a brutal prisoner-of-war camp before escaping and - more amazingly - surviving an ordeal that left him at the mercy of the Southeast Asian jungles. Rescue Dawn (MGM) Starring Christian Bale, Steve Zahn. Written and directed by Werner Herzog. Rated PG-13.
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By Pierre Ruhe and Pierre Ruhe,Special to the Sun | March 12, 2000
In our times, film is the extravagant, anything-seems-possible popular medium. In the 19th century, opera was surely its equivalent, the grandest entertainment spectacle of its day. Gingerly, acclaimed German film director Werner Herzog has been working backward from one to the other. As a filmmaker, his substantive movies are the sort taken up by college film courses and analyzed for their deep psychological meaning, probed for what they reveal about the human condition. Since 1986, though, he's also been directing opera.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | July 27, 2007
If Dieter Dengler hadn't already existed, he would be exactly the sort of character who might have sprung from the fertile imagination of Werner Herzog. Shot down over Laos in 1966, the German-born U.S. fighter pilot endured months in a brutal prisoner-of-war camp before escaping and - more amazingly - surviving an ordeal that left him at the mercy of the Southeast Asian jungles. Rescue Dawn (MGM) Starring Christian Bale, Steve Zahn. Written and directed by Werner Herzog. Rated PG-13.
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By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 25, 2008
Werner Herzog is a magnet for obsessives, and his lovely new film, Encounters at the End of the World, takes you places an ordinary documentary filmmaker might've gone to yet missed completely. At the invitation of the National Science Foundation, Herzog traveled to McMurdo Station in Antarctica, a U.S.-run enclave of 1,100 men and women who study the physical environment. We spend time with ecologists, biologists and survival-school instructors who teach people how not to get lost in a blinding snowstorm.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 7, 2000
Who would want to see "julien donkey-boy," Harmony Korine's grim portrait of a schizophrenic young man coping with a (what else?) dysfunctional family? Fans of Werner Herzog will want to see it to see the legendary German director in a rare screen performance as a blisteringly abusive father. Followers of Korine, who made a name for himself writing "Kids" and later made the wildly controversial "Gummo," will want to check out his latest flick if only to figure out just what he's up to. And cineastes familiar with Dogme '95, a group of Scandinavian filmmakers who authored a theory of low-tech filmmaking two years ago, may want to see the first American movie to be made under its strict aesthetic guidelines.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 11, 2000
The Red Room at Normals Books and Records will hold another screening of Them Films Saturday at 8: 30 p.m. The Red Room's Eric Hatch plans to show Les Blank's "Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe," Stan Brakhage's "Desist Film," Kenneth Anger's "Kustom Kar Kommandos" and work by George Kuchar and local filmmakers. Admission is $6. Normals is at 425 E. 31st. St. For more information call 410-243-6888. Makeover Day Women in Film & Video of Maryland (WIFV) will hold its second annual Makeover Day on Sunday from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. Haircuts, manicures and makeup applications will be available (for $25, $10 and $15, respectively)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | March 12, 2000
When Werner Herzog -- born Werner Stipetic on Sept. 5, 1942 -- first walked out of the remote Bavarian village where he was raised, he had never seen an orange. He had never used a telephone, or seen a movie. But just eight years later, at the age of 19, after working the night shift as a welder in a steel factory in order to raise money, he made his first film. Since then, Herzog has made more than 40 feature films and documentaries, the most recent of which documents his extraordinary collaboration with the German actor Klaus Kinski.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 8, 2001
Werner Herzog hesitates only a moment before deciding on a suitable inscription. "Every man for himself," he writes in thick black Magic Marker, "and God against all." The inscription is the title of perhaps his most ingratiating work, a film released in this country as The Mystery of Kaspar Hauser, the tale of a strange adolescent found wandering the streets of Nuremberg in 1828, illiterate and not even knowing how to speak. It's one of Herzog's most touching works. Why, he's asked, did he choose that quote?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Pierre Ruhe and Pierre Ruhe,Special to the Sun | March 12, 2000
In our times, film is the extravagant, anything-seems-possible popular medium. In the 19th century, opera was surely its equivalent, the grandest entertainment spectacle of its day. Gingerly, acclaimed German film director Werner Herzog has been working backward from one to the other. As a filmmaker, his substantive movies are the sort taken up by college film courses and analyzed for their deep psychological meaning, probed for what they reveal about the human condition. Since 1986, though, he's also been directing opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | March 12, 2000
When Werner Herzog -- born Werner Stipetic on Sept. 5, 1942 -- first walked out of the remote Bavarian village where he was raised, he had never seen an orange. He had never used a telephone, or seen a movie. But just eight years later, at the age of 19, after working the night shift as a welder in a steel factory in order to raise money, he made his first film. Since then, Herzog has made more than 40 feature films and documentaries, the most recent of which documents his extraordinary collaboration with the German actor Klaus Kinski.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 11, 2000
The Red Room at Normals Books and Records will hold another screening of Them Films Saturday at 8: 30 p.m. The Red Room's Eric Hatch plans to show Les Blank's "Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe," Stan Brakhage's "Desist Film," Kenneth Anger's "Kustom Kar Kommandos" and work by George Kuchar and local filmmakers. Admission is $6. Normals is at 425 E. 31st. St. For more information call 410-243-6888. Makeover Day Women in Film & Video of Maryland (WIFV) will hold its second annual Makeover Day on Sunday from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. Haircuts, manicures and makeup applications will be available (for $25, $10 and $15, respectively)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 7, 2000
Who would want to see "julien donkey-boy," Harmony Korine's grim portrait of a schizophrenic young man coping with a (what else?) dysfunctional family? Fans of Werner Herzog will want to see it to see the legendary German director in a rare screen performance as a blisteringly abusive father. Followers of Korine, who made a name for himself writing "Kids" and later made the wildly controversial "Gummo," will want to check out his latest flick if only to figure out just what he's up to. And cineastes familiar with Dogme '95, a group of Scandinavian filmmakers who authored a theory of low-tech filmmaking two years ago, may want to see the first American movie to be made under its strict aesthetic guidelines.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 3, 1996
An opera about the Amazon needs Werner Herzog.After all, the German film director spent four years there making his most famous movie, "Fitzcarraldo," which is about the Sisyphean complications that ensue from its hero's obsession with bringing Enrico Caruso to sing in the jungle.What's more, Herzog himself loves working in opera houses."Living and breathing music for four weeks is like going to Hawaii for me," says the director, 54, a slim, balding man, whose calm, unruffled manner belies his reputation for driving himself and those working for him to extremes in order to achieve intensity in his movies.
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By Carina Chocano and Carina Chocano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2008
You could call Harmony Korine's Mister Lonely a comeback, but that would imply the return was anticipated, or that it heralds a return to form. I'm not sure either description applies. Mister Lonely is just as unconventional, by Hollywood standards, as his earlier films, if markedly less pugnacious. In his latest picture, Korine, who is best known for his screenplay Kids (written in a matter of weeks at the tender age of 22) and the experimental provocations of Gummo and Julien Donkey-Boy, seems to be working through some of the things he went through as wunderkind-turned-washout, taking on the desire to be somebody else and faith in the impossible as themes and manifesting them in his singular, surreal style.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 28, 2008
A film portrait of Billie Holiday, including most of the movie and TV footage of the singer known to exist, will be shown Wednesday at An die Musik Live, 409 N. Charles St. The clips date from 1935 through 1957 and include a jam session with Duke Ellington. There is also an audio interview with a young Mike Wallace and a performance of the legendary "Strange Fruit." Showtime is 7 p.m., and tickets are $8. Information: 410-385-2638 or andiemusik live.com. Self-help onscreen You Can Heal Your Life: The Movie, a film centering on the life and philosophy of self-help advocate Louise L. Hay, will be shown at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow and 7 p.m. Sunday at Your Prescription for Health's Learning Center, 10210 S. Dolfield Blvd.
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