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Welfare System

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NEWS
March 2, 1993
As Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall refines his plan for government reorganization, county employees and unions are behaving predictably -- revving up protests; lobbying the county council and the public; demanding elimination of spending they see as "frivolous," such as the arts, before a single position is cut.In short, they're doing what any workers would do -- look out for their own best interests and fight for their jobs.That is their mission. It is not, however, the central concern of the public nor elected leaders in any jurisdiction, and as the rhetoric intensifies throughout the budget season officials should be careful to remember that.
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NEWS
July 15, 2014
The other day I had a discussion with a friend concerning what we felt was facilitating the decline of this nation. We discussed the problem of illegal immigration as a factor. However, immigrants have been coming to America for hundreds of years - even before we created a legal process for entrance. My friend brought up to fact that many years ago we didn't have a welfare system for which to entice illegal immigrants to relieve the burden after entrance. Before welfare, some came over and made it big through hard work, some were less successful and fell into various levels on the economic ladder, some went back home and some simply died from the failure to "make it. " The majority of Americans couldn't care less what happened to them because they weren't a burden on the system and weren't burdened by what I refer to as excessive humanity.
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NEWS
By Christopher J. McCabe | November 26, 2003
LIKE MOST states, Maryland faces the enormous challenge of significantly improving the way we protect our most vulnerable children. Many problems have existed for far too long in our child welfare system. One example is the Baltimore City Department of Social Services, the largest of our local agencies, which has operated under a federal consent decree for child welfare for 15 years in the child abuse case of L. J. vs. Massinga. The consent decree requires the state Department of Human Resources to comply with certain conditions to protect children.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
The problem with giving poor people the choice to "cash out" of the welfare system is the number of opportunities it affords for even more abuses ( "Escaping the rat maze of the welfare state," Jan. 13). If recipients choose to take the cash, then lose it, they'll go right back on welfare, frustrating the purpose of giving them money in the first place. People could just take the money, spend it on whatever they like, and end up back on welfare. If we decide to not allow them back on welfare, then some people could die as a result of their poor financial planning.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | January 31, 1995
Last weekend in Washington, our nation's political leaders called welfare a "bankrupt system," a "disaster" and a "monumental, colossal failure." The system received a bipartisan tongue-lashing during a working session on the issue held by President Clinton and at the winter meeting of the National Governors Association.Moreover, a consensus seemed to emerge on goals for reform: States wanted more flexibility on designing programs, and all sides called for a greater effort to force welfare recipients to work for their benefits.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A key Senate committee opened debate yesterday on a Republican welfare bill that scales back House-passed legislation but still proposes the most sweeping changes in the 60-year history of the nation's welfare system.Democrats and Republicans on the Senate Finance Committee said they would seek changes in the bill crafted by the committee chairman, Sen. Bob Packwood.Most Democrats criticized the Oregon Republican's bill, though Sen. Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat, called it a "solid plan."
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
Legislative auditors issued a stinging rebuke of Maryland's child welfare system yesterday, charging in a special report that state officials misreported caseworker staffing numbers, failed to initiate or complete investigations into reports of abuse, and provided unreliable information to advocates. As a result of the audit, top lawmakers vowed to investigate the deaths in 2004 of 11 children who were under the care of the state Department of Human Resources, which oversees child welfare programs, including foster care.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The nation's 62-year-old welfare system, condemned last year by federal law, will formally die tomorrow, and a season of state legislative debate has brought new clarity to the decentralized system rising in its place.If the emerging programs share a unifying theme, it can be summarized in a word: work. States are demanding that recipients find it faster, keep it longer and perform it as a condition of aid. Most states regard even a low-paying, dead-end job preferable to the education and training programs they offered in the past.
NEWS
September 2, 2008
Statistically, the most likely profile of a neglectful or abusive parent is a 30-year-old, college-educated white woman who has a job. Yet in Maryland, African-American children are far more likely than their white counterparts to be removed from their homes by child welfare officials because of maltreatment. A recent study by Advocates for Children and Youth, a group that lobbies for children's issues in Maryland, found that while African-Americans make up only a third of the state's children, they constitute nearly three-quarters of the children removed from their homes, and are five times more likely than white children to be placed in group or foster home care.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1999
More than 1,600 state workers charged with investigating and preventing child abuse and neglect are being given a competency test to determine whether they can stay on the job.State officials said the multiple-choice test was designed to cover basics that all child welfare workers should know, but only 60 percent passed on their first tries early this year.The figure had improved to about 80 percent by last week, and Maryland Human Resources Secretary Lynda G. Fox said she expects "in excess of 90 percent" to pass by year's end. Any workers who do not pass by Dec. 31 will be assigned to other jobs that do not involve casework, Fox said.
NEWS
July 18, 2012
Without the consent of Congress, President Barack Obama is gutting the welfare system and transforming it from a safety net into a hammock. Richard LaCourse, Forest Hill
NEWS
By Brenda Donald | July 22, 2010
At the beginning of the O'Malley-Brown administration, Maryland had far too many children in foster care, too many foster children in group homes and too few foster parents. The law virtually required the Department of Human Resources to license any new group home meeting minimum standards, despite the fact that most of the state was already oversaturated with group homes. Our procedures for processing applications for social service programs were outdated and inefficient. It had been more than 20 years since the law was changed to update the amount of child support a parent had to pay. We knew our reforms would require a steady commitment, patience, tenacity and a willingness to challenge the status quo. We faced budget cuts, staff shortages and a skeptical group of advocates — most of whom were unconvinced that a historically troubled and underfunded agency could make real progress.
NEWS
June 25, 2009
The stories were horrifying and heart-wrenching: a boy beaten bloody while in foster care; a 15-year-old girl tortured and starved to death by a mentally ill guardian; a 5-year-old fatally scalded by his mother after state officials removed him from a safe foster home. It's no wonder such egregious cases of abuse and neglect have helped drive a 25-year-old lawsuit over how the Maryland Department of Human Resources and the Baltimore Department of Social Services care for the state's most vulnerable children and adolescents.
NEWS
September 2, 2008
Statistically, the most likely profile of a neglectful or abusive parent is a 30-year-old, college-educated white woman who has a job. Yet in Maryland, African-American children are far more likely than their white counterparts to be removed from their homes by child welfare officials because of maltreatment. A recent study by Advocates for Children and Youth, a group that lobbies for children's issues in Maryland, found that while African-Americans make up only a third of the state's children, they constitute nearly three-quarters of the children removed from their homes, and are five times more likely than white children to be placed in group or foster home care.
NEWS
February 26, 2008
Many Maryland lawmakers want to get tougher on people who are required by law to report possible child abuse and neglect. Last week the Senate passed a bill that would impose criminal penalties for failing to report. Although the sentiment is understandable, it may be more important to increase training so that workers responsible for children and families in the child welfare system and their mandated helpers can do their jobs effectively. Maryland is one of about 18 states that requires everyone to report suspected child abuse, according to a legislative audit.
NEWS
By Charlie Cooper | January 15, 2008
Police allege that Bryanna Harris' mother fed her methadone to stop her from crying and hit her in the abdomen. In the face of Bryanna's abhorrent death, volunteers with Maryland's Citizens Review Board for Children are frustrated that so many of our recommendations for improvements to the child welfare system have been ignored over the past decade. Bryanna's death will lead to calls for the automatic removal of children from their homes based on some fixed set of indicators - a sure formula for disaster in a stressed system.
NEWS
December 18, 2006
Starting up the new computer system that is supposed to make it easier to track Maryland's child welfare cases has been postponed once again in Baltimore. But the delay seems unavoidable, as recurring glitches need to be fixed before sensitive information can be entrusted to the system and relied on by caseworkers. State and city officials promise to get the system on track in the next month or so, which is a good thing because the potential benefits are important. The new monitoring system, dubbed Chessie, promises to make child-welfare data collection uniform throughout the state.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
Members of the Maryland House Judiciary Committee have squandered an opportunity to bring more accountability to the state child welfare system by watering down a proposal that would have subjected child abuse case records to more outside review and provided additional oversight of the state's handling of vulnerable children. The proposed legislation required state social service administrators to disclose information about abused and neglected children who died or suffered severe physical injuries to state attorneys' offices, local health commissioners and attorneys who represented the children in guardianship proceedings, among others.
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