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Welfare Rolls

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NEWS
December 25, 1990
The human side of this region's economic problems can be seen all too clearly in the bulging welfare rolls of Baltimore's suburbs.In the past year, the number of Baltimore County families receiving help under the Aid to Families with Dependant Children program surged 22 percent. Harford logged a 24 percent increase and Howard and Anne Arundel welfare rolls grew by 20 and 17 percent, respectively. Families receiving government assistance rose 24 percent in the Washington suburbs.What accounts for this rise?
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 9, 2012
Fact: Photo identification is a necessary element of life in America today. Opinion: Don't believe it? Try cashing an out-of-town check; visiting just about any office building in the country; getting on a commercial airplane; or, buying some types of non-prescription allergy medicines. Of course, Attorney General Eric Holder possesses a more selective view of photo identification. For him, having to produce such proof of identity at the polls is somehow discriminatory against minorities.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
Howard County's welfare rolls are growing as poor urban residents move from Baltimore and other jurisdictions in search of a better life -- but not to the degree that numbers from the state's new bug-ridden computer system would suggest.According to those numbers, Howard County supposedly had a 32 percent increase in recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), the nation's primary welfare program, from February 1994 to February 1995.But the state's new computer system, which went into effect in Howard in November, apparently counted every member of a household in which someone receives AFDC, instead of just the recipients, said Sharon Haynie, an assistant director for the state Department of Human Resources.
NEWS
January 5, 2005
ADMINISTRATORS AT the Maryland Department of Human Resources point to the state's record low welfare caseload as proof of successfully moving people from dependency "toward jobs and careers." The 66,725 individuals receiving benefits is the lowest in 41 years and a 70 percent decrease since January 1995, when the caseload was more than 227,000. Welfare administrators say the drop represents "success in the workplace" by former recipients who went through state job training programs. Families are better off as a result, they say. Too bad that's only part of the story.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2004
WASHINGTON -- In a trend that has surprised many experts, the federal welfare rolls have declined over the past three years, even as unemployment, poverty and the number of food stamp recipients have surged in a weak economy. After Congress overhauled the nation's welfare system in 1996, the number of families receiving benefits dropped much faster than federal and state officials had expected. Even more remarkable, officials say, the rolls did not grow during the recession of 2001 or the sluggish economy since.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1997
Welfare rolls in Maryland have dropped 22 percent in the past two years, Gov. Parris N. Glendening said yesterday, calling the decline "a really dramatic success story."The governor said 32,000 children and 19,000 adults are off welfare, attributing much of the decrease to public policy efforts."It's dramatic because of the involvement of the legislature, working together with the administration and working with employers and communities to move people from a life of dependency to one of self-sufficiency," he said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Buoyed by new statistics that show plunging welfare rolls and soaring employment levels, President Clinton hailed the success of the 1996 welfare reform law yesterday, even as he exhorted business and congressional leaders to help those left behind. The federal government's first state-by-state study of welfare reform indicated that caseloads have fallen 40 percent nationally since the law was enacted in 1996, from 12.2 million to 7.3 million, the lowest level since 1967.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
In a major effort to help put welfare recipients back to work, Giant Food Inc. has agreed to hire dozens of workers who will make between $5.50 and $6.50 an hour.The region's largest grocer interviewed 150 people Tuesday for part-time jobs in its 175-store chain."We are hoping to get some good people and at the same time provide some good career opportunities," said Steve Lerman, manager of Giant's employment center for the Baltimore area, who will make the first job offers today.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke noted the commitment yesterday at his weekly news conference and said, "That is good as we participate in welfare reform, moving more people from dependence to independence.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1996
Anne Arundel County's welfare rolls have shrunk at more than twice the pace of those in the rest of Maryland since the county Department of Social Services started a job-search program in September, welfare officials say.Over the past five months, the number of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) recipients fell 8 percent, to 8,304 from 9,023 in Arundel, while those in Maryland's other counties and Baltimore dropped 3.6 percent.The Up Front Jobs Search program, the only one of its kind in the state, steers people away from public assistance and toward jobs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Millions of people have left the welfare rolls since Congress overhauled the federal program two years ago, but what happened to them has been a puzzle for policy-makers.Now, the most comprehensive study of the new system says more and more are going to work.The General Accounting Office, a nonpartisan arm of Congress, said yesterday that there had been sharp increases in the proportion of welfare recipients being placed in jobs.Since President Clinton took office, the number of people on welfare has fallen 37 percent, to 8.9 million in March 1998 from 14.1 million in January 1993.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2004
WASHINGTON -- In a trend that has surprised many experts, the federal welfare rolls have declined over the past three years, even as unemployment, poverty and the number of food stamp recipients have surged in a weak economy. After Congress overhauled the nation's welfare system in 1996, the number of families receiving benefits dropped much faster than federal and state officials had expected. Even more remarkable, officials say, the rolls did not grow during the recession of 2001 or the sluggish economy since.
NEWS
By V. Dion Haynes and V. Dion Haynes,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 18, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Michelle O'Leary said she believes that she would still be raising her children on welfare had she not married Michael nearly three years ago. And Michael O'Leary said he believes that the two would still be single had they not gone through a six-week premarital program at their church in Kansas City, Kan., that taught them skills such as balancing a budget, disciplining their children and resolving conflicts. "We had different opinions on everything," said Michael O'Leary, a school custodian.
NEWS
By Nina Bernstein and Nina Bernstein,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 21, 2001
Four years after the national overhaul of welfare, economists and welfare researchers are questioning some of the truisms of its shrinking rolls, including the belief that people who got off the rolls were the ones best prepared to work and that the caseload increases that inspired the overhaul were caused by a rising number of single mothers on relief. An analysis of several studies suggests that the women who have been most likely to leave the welfare rolls include many with difficulties - such as with serious health problems - that make them more likely to be thrown off for violating stricter rules, Robert A. Moffitt, a professor of economics at the Johns Hopkins University, said at a recent conference of welfare researchers and economists sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 28, 1999
MILWAUKEE -- Caseworkers rarely ask and clients rarely tell, but growing evidence suggests that disproportionately large numbers of women on welfare were sexually abused as children, a finding that offers new insight into many of the so-called hard cases that are an increasing focus of the national effort to overhaul the welfare system.The frequency of childhood violation helps explain the roots of problems that are commonly recognized as blocking a successful transition from welfare. Women who were raped or molested as children are more likely to become addicted to alcohol or drugs, to suffer disabling battles with anxiety or depression and to become victims of domestic violence.
NEWS
By Jim Lynskey | October 4, 1999
IGNORANCE is not random," exclaimed Sen. Paul Wellstone, a Minnesota Democrat, earlier this year as he pleaded in vain for support of his amendment that would have required the Department of Health and Human Services to track the well-being of former welfare recipients.Since the 1996 welfare reforms were initiated, an estimated 4.6 million Americans, mostly women and children, have been forced off the welfare rolls.A study by the General Accounting Office found that most adults who left public aid in recent years were able to find work, but the actual well-being of families after welfare remains unknown.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening pledged yesterday to spend an additional $46 million on child care for thousands of low-income families struggling to remain off welfare.With the number of Marylanders on welfare continuing to drop dramatically, the state has accumulated a surplus in the program of $86 million -- money the governor said should be used largely to help people stay off public assistance."Keeping people off of welfare, especially in the short run, requires significant support," Glendening said.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | August 24, 1998
In four years, America's welfare rolls have tumbled a phenomenal 37 percent, from 14.4 million to 9 million recipients. In the history of national relief, there's never been a drop like this.And the credit can't just go to a booming national economy. As House Ways and Means Chairman Bill Archer, a Texas Republican, correctly notes, welfare rolls actually grew during the '80s as the nation added 20 million jobs, compared with 12 million in this decade.Just since 1995 in New York City, note Jan Rosenberg and Fred Siegel in a special study for the New York Daily News, the welfare caseload has plunged from a record 1.1 million to 763,000 -- "despite sluggish local job growth, a notoriously resistant welfare bureaucracy, and a highly organized lobby of welfare advocates."
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1999
The long-dreaded federal welfare reform deadline forcing recipients to work or lose benefits came and went in Maryland without the hue and cry some advocates for the poor predicted. In August, Maryland Department of Social Services administrators in Baltimore estimated that 9,000 city families faced losing cash assistance because of the federal two-year work deadline. The state estimates that it has placed 5,030 city welfare recipients in jobs over the last two years. Of the 9,000 recipients in August who faced benefit cutoffs, 7,500 were linked to services that will keep them eligible.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Critics of the watershed welfare law of 1996 forecast any number of problems, from starving children to dwindling benefits to Depression-era soup lines. But virtually no one imagined the strange new condition startling the experts coast to coast: States have more federal money, literally, than they know how to spend.That is because the welfare rolls have dropped dramatically while federal financing remains, by law, fixed at historic highs.Consider Wisconsin's version of the new welfare math.
NEWS
August 21, 1999
Welfare reform's social costs are much too highThe Sun's editorial "Undermining progress of welfare reform" (Aug. 13) is correct that it is outrageous that Republicans want to fund their tax cuts for the wealthy with temporary savings from welfare reform grants to the states and other programs for the disadvantaged.Welfare reform may be a success in that welfare rolls have been cut, but it has been anything but successful in steering people toward self-sufficiency.As The Sun pointed out, those who leave welfare "are the new working poor, barely able to make ends meet."
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