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By Carl T. Rowan | August 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- For almost four years I've struggled not to embrace the charge that President Clinton is really ''Slick Willie,'' a craven politician of flawed character who has no core beliefs, no ideological moorings and no allies he won't abandon when he thinks it benefits him.I stopped giving him the benefit of doubt in 1993 when, under pressure, he dumped Lani Guinier as his choice to head the civil-rights division of the Justice Department. I was reminded then that in Mr. Clinton's Arkansas they have a term -- ''yellow belly'' -- for men who lack backbone.
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NEWS
July 28, 2014
It didn't take Democrats much time to denounce Rep. Paul Ryan's latest plan for addressing poverty in this country. The main feature of the Republican's proposed "Opportunity Grant" would be to roll a lot of social welfare programs together and leave it mostly to states to decide how the money is spent, which sounds a great deal like the block grant proposals of the past. Critics included Maryland's own Rep. Chris Van Hollen, ranking member on the House Budget Committee, who said the former vice presidential nominee has used the mantra of "reform" as a cover to cut safety-net programs.
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NEWS
By Edwin J. Feulner Jr | March 9, 1994
THE recent announcement by the White House that it is scaling back its welfare-reform plans should come as no surprise.If the president were really serious about "ending welfare as we know it," his administration wouldn't be spending more money than ever on the same conventional welfare programs that already have cost U.S. taxpayers more than $5 trillion since President Johnson launched the War on Poverty in 1965. That's $5 trillion: more than the entire cost of battling Germany and Japan in World War II, or $50,000 for every family in America.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
Johns Hopkins Hospital's refusal to openly negotiate with its underpaid health care workers is beyond embarrassing but unfortunately revealing of some of the real operating values of this world class institution ( "Thousands gather to protest pay at Hopkins Hospital," May 10). As its' own Bloomberg School of Public Health has researched and demonstrated again and again, one's environment is as important a determinant of health as what goes on inside one's body. Workers who come in every day exhausted, stressed and worried about their family's welfare cannot portray an example of health and well being that the hospital portends is one of its primary values.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1994
Decrying the welfare system as a form of "slavery" that can rob people of their incentive to succeed, the Maryland NAACP has endorsed in principle a Schaefer administration welfare-reform plan.But the Maryland State Conference of NAACP Branches, which is to release a letter to Gov. William Donald Schaefer today, stopped short of backing the most controversial element of the governor's plan: a "family cap" that would deny additional benefits to mothers who have babies while receiving public assistance.
NEWS
July 18, 2012
Without the consent of Congress, President Barack Obama is gutting the welfare system and transforming it from a safety net into a hammock. Richard LaCourse, Forest Hill
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1994
The Maryland House and Senate set themselves on a collision course over welfare reform yesterday, one chamber approving a limit on payments to recipients who have more children, the other refusing to go along.The Senate, on a strong 29-18 vote, gave final approval to the welfare reform proposal, complete with the so-called "cap" on family size and the scrapping of funding restrictions on abortions for poor women.The House passed its measure 109-23 without the cap, but agreed under pressure from abortion rights advocates to fund abortions with state medical assistance money if the cap is eventually enacted.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening joined state legislative leaders yesterday to support a pilot welfare reform program that they said would help move people from dependence to work and keep poor families together.The program, which is pending before the General Assembly, would require some parents to find a job, perform community service or enroll in a job-placement program within three months of going on the welfare rolls.To encourage families to stay together, the program also would allow households to continue to receive welfare payments even if the father worked more than 100 hours in one month.
NEWS
By Michael Tanner | August 13, 2013
Contrary to stereotypes, there is no evidence that people on welfare are lazy. Indeed, surveys of welfare recipients consistently show their desire for a job. However, there is also evidence that many are reluctant to accept available employment opportunities. In fact, despite the work requirements included in the 1996 welfare reform, less than 13 percent of adult welfare recipients in Maryland are working in unsubsidized jobs, while roughly 45 percent are involved in the broader definition of work participation, which includes activities like job search and training.
NEWS
July 18, 2012
Without the consent of Congress, President Barack Obama is gutting the welfare system and transforming it from a safety net into a hammock. Richard LaCourse, Forest Hill
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | November 22, 2011
Ronald Reagan famously asked Americans, "Are you better off than you were four years ago?" in a 1980 debate with then-President Jimmy Carter. They weren't, and Reagan, a Republican, went on to win the 1980 election in a landslide. Baltimore City residents are not better off than they were two years ago, or four years ago or even 10 years ago. In the last decade, tens of thousands of people have left, along with their jobs, shrinking the tax base. And poverty is at 26 percent, up 20 percent from a year earlier.
NEWS
September 30, 2011
Poverty is caused by a number of issues, primary among them unemployment or low-wage employment - not laziness or lack of personal responsibility. Far from it. Those exist, but it's safe to say the "working poor" work long hours often at two or more jobs for subsistence-level compensation. Because of their income, or lack of it, the poor cannot afford health care, making them more susceptible to disease and less likely to work full or part-time. The remedy is not welfare hand-outs of the past, meager and demeaning as they are, or welfare reform, which does nothing to ensure a living wage for newly hired workers.
NEWS
July 28, 2011
While Rep. Chris Van Hollen may wish that a deal to fix the federal government's fiscal problems could leave Medicaid untouched, the reality is that if the federal deficit is to be addressed, entitlement programs like Medicaid must be fundamentally reformed ("Debt crisis could hurt Maryland," July 17). Under the current Medicaid system, in which the federal government gives Maryland a dollar-for-dollar match for every Medicaid dollar the state spends, there is little incentive to control costs.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
Two days after a state senator said Maryland Human Resources Secretary Brenda Donald's signature child welfare program was "not working," Donald received a warm reception - even applause - when she appeared before another group of lawmakers Thursday. At a briefing for the Joint Committee on Children, Youth and Families, Donald summarized how she believes "Place Matters," which she launched two years ago, is working to improve outcomes for vulnerable children. Under this new approach, the department focuses on reuniting foster children with their own families or keeping them in family settings, which has reduced the state's reliance on group home beds by nearly half.
NEWS
September 13, 2008
Gary MacDougal can provide circumstantial evidence that welfare reform in Maryland reduced poverty, but only by ignoring the eyewitness accounts that indicate otherwise ("The welfare reform model," Commentary, Sept. 8). Since 1996, the University of Maryland School of Social Work has, at the behest of the state, engaged in a comprehensive longitudinal study of those who exit the welfare rolls. This information indicates that roughly half of the "welfare leavers" are employed in the three months after they leave welfare.
NEWS
By Gary MacDougal | September 8, 2008
When the Republican Congress and Democratic President Bill Clinton agreed to "end welfare as we know it" in 1996, it stood to reason that states would need time to recover from decades of policies that undermined work incentives and encouraged family breakups - or never forming two-parent families in the first place. After more than a decade with the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 in place, however, we now can see success has been widespread and deep, and we can assess how some states effectively capitalized on the freedom offered by this landmark national welfare reform, and how some failed embarrassingly.
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