Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWelfare Recipients
IN THE NEWS

Welfare Recipients

NEWS
January 17, 1996
ANYONE WHOSE car got buried in a drift or trapped on a side street for a day or longer last week ought to now have a better understanding about how difficult it is for a welfare recipient to get and hold a job if he or she doesn't have a car.In a recent survey by the Anne Arundel County Department of Social Services, lack of transportation ranked second only to child care complications as the biggest obstacle to getting people off public assistance and...
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 16, 1993
RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- After a decade of nationa experimentation, no program has done as much to raise the earnings of people on welfare as one here in Riverside County, and its workings can be seen in the gains, losses and dish-worn hands of Janice McClung.The philosophy here is unromantic: Get a job, any job, even a low-paying, unpleasant job. That cuts across the more prevalent national practice, which stresses education and training first, in the hope that people on welfare can earn more later.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
Lawyers who represent welfare recipients in Baltimore yesterday filed a class action lawsuit against the Baltimore City Department of Social Services, claiming the agency has effectively denied the appeal rights of thousands of recipients who have had benefits cut off. The suit, filed in Baltimore City Circuit Court by the Family Investment Program legal clinic, named as its lead plaintiff an East Baltimore mother of four who in January lost food stamps...
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1997
Moving last night to fill a gap in federal funding, the Baltimore County Council unanimously approved using local money to train welfare recipients for new jobs, and also chose Joseph Bartenfelder as its new chairman.The training votes were to approve five, six-month contracts worth $348,595 for teaching skills to 110 people -- a service the federal government will no longer pay for under its welfare reform law.Because of that change, Baltimore County decided to eliminate a $10-a-month cash supplement for welfare families, and use the $700,000 savings to pay for the training instead.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1996
A stripped-down 1986 Plymouth Reliant with roughly 100,000 miles on it could speed Deborah Wright off government assistance.The four-door sedan is one of dozens from Anne Arundel County's fleet that the Department of Social Services will offer in a new program aimed at getting people off public aid by providing them with reliable transportation to jobs.Called Wheels for Work, the initiative is the first of its kind in the state. Officials at the state Department of Human Resources, which oversees local welfare programs, are urging other counties to follow the Arundel example, said J. C. Shay, a department spokesman.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1997
Yesterday was independence day for five Woodlawn women, the day they became certified basic emergency medical technicians, or paramedics.The women, welfare recipients, joined the Woodlawn Volunteer Fire Company and underwent months of rigorous training for the qualifications that allow them to apply for paramedic jobs with fire departments, private ambulance companies, hospitals and nursing homes.Even more important was the knowledge that they -- and three others who were not at the certification ceremony at the Woodlawn volunteer station -- are working their way off the welfare rolls, on which they have been from a few months to several years.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
A photo caption was omitted on the cover of today's Business section. The photo is of Bridget Rucker, a graduate of Business Owners Start-up Services who has been unable to get aid from the program.* The Sun regerts the errorsBridget Rucker spent the first half of 1992 planning her escape from welfare: She'd use the training and loan offered by a state-funded program to open a hair salon."I was so happy. I finally got a break," she recalls.But five months after completing the training, her business plan hasn't even been considered by the loan board, and she has lost options on several stores because of the delay.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2000
Responding to the request of women on welfare who wanted to stay in college, the Maryland Department of Human Resources has agreed to allow Baltimore City Community College students to count their studies as work under welfare-reform rules. The agreement, to be announced at a celebration this afternoon after the college's graduation ceremony, also calls for the state to pay for an additional 100 work-study slots for welfare recipients at the school. The state work-study program, which will cost the state nearly $1.3 million over the next two years, is designed to encourage those welfare recipients who can maintain passing grades in community college to pursue education and get career training instead of having to go straight into full-time work.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | November 9, 1998
RICHMOND, Va. -- Why would a chamber of commerce grasp the sticky wicket of welfare reform? And not only preach change, but also contract to run the welfare system for a city and three suburban counties?To create a good business climate, with skilled workers, improve schools and lower the crime rate, replies James W. Dunn, president of the Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce."There's nothing easy, nothing glamorous about the welfare reform job we've taken on. But if we can figure this out, use our business skills to transform welfare recipients into workers with sustainable incomes, we'll have a real competitive edge.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.