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Welfare Recipients

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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | October 18, 1994
Public housing residents will soon be learning to transcribe doctors' notes for medical records in a new program designed to teach job skills to welfare recipients.In a yearlong program scheduled to begin next month, Back to Basics will train 18 residents of Murphy Homes and Lexington Terrace in medical transcription, preparing them for job opportunities at the University of Maryland Medical Center and other hospitals."The most valuable social program we can provide is a job," Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday morning at Lexington Terrace, in a ceremony announcing the program.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Olivia Griffin gets to her job at Johns Hopkins Hospital an hour early each work day just to make sure she isn't late. It's not an easy feat for the 25-year-old mother of two who relies on the bus and subway for transportation from her West Baltimore home to the East Baltimore campus. But she doesn't mind because she loves her work and hopes to spend her career in health care at Hopkins. "I had training as a medical assistant but I couldn't find a job opportunity," said Griffin, who began work in patient transportation in October but plans on becoming a registered nurse.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Frank Langfitt contributed to this article | March 20, 1995
Under a pilot welfare reform proposal by Gov. Parris N. Glendening, some welfare parents in Baltimore and Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties would have to work to keep receiving payments from the state.The program would require parents with school-age children in those jurisdictions to find a job, perform community service or enroll in a job-training program within three months of going on the welfare rolls.Mr. Glendening offered the proposals over the weekend in the form of amendments to a welfare reform bill in the House of Delegates.
NEWS
By Michael Tanner | August 13, 2013
Contrary to stereotypes, there is no evidence that people on welfare are lazy. Indeed, surveys of welfare recipients consistently show their desire for a job. However, there is also evidence that many are reluctant to accept available employment opportunities. In fact, despite the work requirements included in the 1996 welfare reform, less than 13 percent of adult welfare recipients in Maryland are working in unsubsidized jobs, while roughly 45 percent are involved in the broader definition of work participation, which includes activities like job search and training.
NEWS
By Christina Asquith and Christina Asquith,Sun Staff Writer | August 16, 1995
The day after receiving federal approval to reform the welfare system, county officials and welfare recipients gathered last night to discuss what they see as the biggest obstacles to change -- poor communication, deadbeat dads and a lack of transportation for working mothers.Sitting around a table at the Glen Burnie United Methodist Church, state Del. John R. Leopold and members of the county Department of Social Services listened as Beverly Conroy, who has been on and off welfare for 12 years, recommended reforms.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
State officials are finding relatively few takers for a program that grants businesses thousands of dollars in tax credits for hiring welfare recipients.Three months ago, Maryland became one of only a handful of states to adopt the tax incentive, a measure some regard as a key provision of the welfare reform movement. But since the program went into effect July 1, employers have sought to certify fewer than 40 prospective workers -- a tiny fraction of the estimated 70,500 people who could qualify for the benefit, state officials said.
NEWS
By Cheryl L. Tan and Cheryl L. Tan,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Four years ago, Veronica Whitaker went from being a fairly well-off forklift operator to a divorced mother on welfare, struggling to support her three children. While on welfare, she realized that finding jobs was hard, but staying employed was even harder.With FUTURE, an employment program for Baltimore welfare recipients that officially was launched yesterday, Whitaker finally has a shot at not just a temporary job, but a new career in the hotel industry that she hopes could help put her teen-agers through college.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1997
Tammy's Transport? South County Connector?This week, seven Anne Arundel County residents who were about to be or are on welfare are mulling over potential business names as they start an innovative Department of Social Services program aimed at turning them into entrepreneurs.With the help of a federal grant, DSS will underwrite the cost of setting up the seven as the owners of van services that will go into business Nov. 15. If the program succeeds, it could help dozens of people get off welfare.
NEWS
March 22, 1997
IS IT POSSIBLE that, despite safeguards in federal law, the real losers as welfare recipients go to work could be the working poor in minimum wage jobs?Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development fears that's the case. The coalition of some 30 inner-city organizations says it has evidence that some companies, in order to gain tax credits or grants, are firing existing minimum-wage employees and filling the vacancies with persons who were on welfare."The idea of tax credits was to encourage the hiring of new people and not create musical chairs," says a BUILD organizer.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1997
Gov. Parris N. Glendening issued an executive order yesterday designed to prevent employers from displacing current workers to hire taxpayer-subsidized welfare recipients.The order, hailed by supporters as the first of its kind in the nation, fulfills a promise Glendening made in May after meeting with union leaders and community groups in Baltimore. Participants in the meeting expressed concern that welfare reform would pit poor working Marylanders against even poorer welfare recipients.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
The impoverished face enough challenges without the government adding identity theft to their woes. But officials at Maryland's Department of Human Resources are dealing with just that prospect after recently learning that an employee caused nearly 3,000 names with corresponding Social Security numbers to be placed on an Internet site. That the DHR even learned that such a breach of protocol took place was only due to the efforts of the nonprofit Liberty Coalition, which works to maintain online privacy.
NEWS
July 20, 2010
Tira Jones has simply gone from one form of welfare to another ("Stimulus-money jobs are a win-win for state; Ex-welfare recipients now get paycheck as they shrink backlog of assistance claims," July 19). Printing money or taking it from working taxpayers in order to give it to individuals like Ms. Jones may do something for her self-esteem, but it doesn't do anything to move the economy forward. It simply further bloats an already excessive public sector that "regulates," "reallocates," "analyzes," and "consults" rather than working and paying and producing and creating.
NEWS
By Gary MacDougal | September 8, 2008
When the Republican Congress and Democratic President Bill Clinton agreed to "end welfare as we know it" in 1996, it stood to reason that states would need time to recover from decades of policies that undermined work incentives and encouraged family breakups - or never forming two-parent families in the first place. After more than a decade with the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 in place, however, we now can see success has been widespread and deep, and we can assess how some states effectively capitalized on the freedom offered by this landmark national welfare reform, and how some failed embarrassingly.
NEWS
By Katie McMinn Campbell and Will Marshall | November 6, 2007
For all his talk of "compassionate conservatism," President Bush has done remarkably little to empower America's poor. What a contrast with his predecessor, Bill Clinton, who radically reformed welfare, moved millions of people off the dole and into jobs, and made a serious dent in poverty. The Bush administration's inaction leaves it to America's next president to pick up where Mr. Clinton left off. But while Mr. Clinton's reforms encouraged welfare recipients - mostly single mothers with children - to work, it's time to focus on the other side of the poverty equation: the men who father their children.
NEWS
By Brianna Bond and Brianna Bond,Capital News Service | November 24, 2006
Early next year, welfare clients on the Lower Eastern Shore will have an opportunity to participate in a welfare-to-work program at a local community college, nearly doubling the number of job slots for the program. The expansion reflects a statewide trend, as social service offices struggle to redesign their programs to accommodate tougher federal work requirements included in the welfare reauthorization legislation that took effect in October. In January, Wicomico, Worcester and Somerset counties will join Wor-Wic Community College in Salisbury to place 15 welfare recipients in food service, landscaping, clerical and other entry-level jobs on campus, adding to the 20 to 30 work-experience job slots in the tri-county area.
NEWS
September 24, 2006
New welfare rules do promote work The Sun's recent editorial opposing the Bush administration's new welfare regulations stated: "The new rules will only exacerbate the problem of a core group of people cycling on and off welfare" ("Messing with success," Sept. 18). That's not true. President Bush believes we should help welfare recipients get and keep good jobs, and not merely allow them to languish on the welfare rolls. To that end, the purpose of the administration's new rules is to ensure that states are engaging as many adult welfare recipients as possible in activities that lead to work.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 29, 1998
The state has approved a two-year pilot project allowing as many as 500 welfare recipients attending Baltimore City Community College to count their schooling as a "work activity" under welfare reform, a school official says.Under the project, which will be evaluated by the University of Maryland, Baltimore school of social work, students would not have to work 20 hours a week, as might otherwise be required under reform, said Harry Bosk, spokesman for the Maryland Department of Human Resources.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1998
The nation will need 150,000 more electricians by the turn of the century, and welfare recipients need jobs.That makes for a perfect combination of supply and demand, according to Independent Electrical Contractors, a national trade association with a chapter in Odenton.I.E.C. Chesapeake is opening a training building in Odenton and wants to fill it with area welfare recipients willing to become electrician apprentices."Each week in the Sunday employment section, there's about 10 to 20 companies that are hiring electricians," said Grant Shmelzer, executive director of I.E.C.
NEWS
September 18, 2006
Ten years after the nation's welfare laws were overhauled, forcing millions of poor, single mothers off public assistance and into the work force, the social outcomes have been mostly positive. More of these women are working and setting their own paths than ever before. Some troubling trends now threaten their long-term prospects, however. Though they earn more than they did on welfare, many remain poor, according to a recent study by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Child poverty has increased in recent years as the number of children who receive public assistance has fallen.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration plans to issue sweeping new rules today that will require states to move much larger numbers of poor people from welfare to work. The rules represent the biggest changes in welfare policy since 1996, when Congress abolished the federal guarantee of cash assistance for the nation's poorest children. Since then, the number of welfare recipients has plunged more than 60 percent, to 4.4 million people from 12.2 million. For the first time, the rules set a uniform definition for permissible work activities and require states to verify and document the number of hours worked by welfare recipients.
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