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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic-led House is trying to seize the Republican "family values" theme by approving new federal spending on child welfare and food programs and imposing a 10 percent surtax on millionaires to pay for them.Opponents charged that the measure, adopted on a 256-163 roll-call vote yesterday with relatively few Republican votes, was an election-year ploy that would be vetoed by President Bush if it were passed by Congress. The legislation faces an uncertain fate in the Senate.
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NEWS
July 14, 2012
Your recent article, "Labor shortages plague farms," (July 7) states the plight of American farmers. What it does not address is that these farmers have become so accustomed to breaking the law to get cheap labor that they think they have a right to it. For decades they have been hiring illegal immigrants to get an unfair advantage over those who choose to abide by the law or have such small operations that they do not hire non-family members....
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 31, 1995
When states control their own welfare programs, they will compete for the stingiest, the winners driving the poor and homeless to other states.The Secretary of Commerce is under investigation for commerce.Rush Limbaugh for chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities?The 49ers struck gold again; the Chargers need a recharge.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2010
WASHINGTON - Local governments would receive billions of dollars for construction projects and welfare programs under a bill passed Wednesday in the House, the latest in a series of election-year jobs bills Democrats are pushing in Congress. The bill combines $13.2 billion in interest subsidies for local construction bonds with $3.6 billion in tax cuts for small businesses and $2.5 billion in aide to states to pay for expanded welfare programs through September 2011. The House passed the measure 246-178, with nearly all Republicans opposed.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2010
WASHINGTON - Local governments would receive billions of dollars for construction projects and welfare programs under a bill passed Wednesday in the House, the latest in a series of election-year jobs bills Democrats are pushing in Congress. The bill combines $13.2 billion in interest subsidies for local construction bonds with $3.6 billion in tax cuts for small businesses and $2.5 billion in aide to states to pay for expanded welfare programs through September 2011. The House passed the measure 246-178, with nearly all Republicans opposed.
NEWS
July 14, 2012
Your recent article, "Labor shortages plague farms," (July 7) states the plight of American farmers. What it does not address is that these farmers have become so accustomed to breaking the law to get cheap labor that they think they have a right to it. For decades they have been hiring illegal immigrants to get an unfair advantage over those who choose to abide by the law or have such small operations that they do not hire non-family members....
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The Schaefer administration's proposal for a massive reorganization of state agencies dealing with social services crossed a major barrier yesterday as the second Senate committee to review the bill gave its approval.Senate Finance Committee Chairman Thomas Patrick O'Reilly, D-Prince George's, said he will bring the bill to the full Senate Monday, where he anticipates no resistance.Given that, the 192-page bill's only problem may be that barely a week remains before the end of the current legislative session.
NEWS
December 1, 1994
There is an inevitable connection, often overlooked, between welfare and charity. Welfare is the government's often clumsy attempt to ease the pains of poverty. Charities often have the same goal, but do their work through private means. As the new Republican-controlled Congress debates welfare reform proposals in the coming months, it is important to keep in mind the similarities and differences between these two essential ways of providing aid for the poor.Welfare systems often produce large, relatively impersonal bureaucracies.
NEWS
June 16, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Chicago Tribune, which was published Monday.THE General Accounting Office study of welfare programs in 17 states has found that the number of adults who have found work after leaving public aid is much larger than previously reported.Between 63 percent and 87 percent, depending on the state, had a job at some point after leaving welfare, the study found.That's good news, no doubt the result of the happy convergence of the new approach to welfare and the powerful, long-running economic boom in which joblessness, like welfare rolls, has fallen to its lowest level since the mid-1960s.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | October 8, 1990
NEW ORLEANS -- Buoyed by the support of a stunning 44 percent of Louisiana voters, ex-Klansman David Duke conceded defeat yesterday in his race for the U.S. Senate but proclaimed victory for his message of ending affirmative action and slashing welfare programs.Political analysts agreed that Duke's strong showing suggested he had become a viable voice for a major segment of frustrated white voters and some suggested that his success might change the political landscape in Louisiana and beyond.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | January 19, 2006
A hearing on the status of Maryland's child welfare programs turned confrontational yesterday as legislators in Annapolis grilled Department of Human Resources officials on an audit that exposed flaws in the agency's staffing numbers, abuse and neglect investigations, and recordkeeping. DHR Secretary Christopher J. McCabe, responding publicly for the first time to the audit that was released last week, said he and his team of administrators recognize that there is room for improvement, but emphasized that they have made important changes, such as increasing staffing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - Welfare programs around the country are in limbo because of a stalemate in Congress that has prompted state officials to postpone new investments in child care, expansions of job training and most other initiatives for welfare recipients and low-wage workers. Congressional Republicans insist that stricter work requirements must be part of any effort to renew the 1996 welfare law. Democrats, including some who voted against that measure, now embrace it, saying only minor changes are needed.
NEWS
February 29, 2004
Transitional aid keeps disabled off the streets I was distressed by the irresponsible comments of Kevin M. McGuire, executive director of welfare programs for the state Department of Human Resources, regarding cuts in the Transitional Emergency Medical and Housing Assistance (TEMHA) program ("Md. social services chief vows progress," Feb. 23). TEMHA serves as the last line of defense between abject poverty and homelessness and provides critical funds to those waiting for approval for federal programs that assist the disabled.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Half the Senate, including many Democrats, called on the majority leader yesterday to schedule a debate on re-authorizing the welfare program created by an innovative 1996 law that expires in three weeks. In a letter Democratic Sen. Tom Daschle of South Dakota, the senators said the program should be extended for five years, with more money for child care. In May, the House passed a welfare bill along the lines favored by President Bush. It would impose stricter work requirements on recipients and provide a modest increase in money for child care.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2002
Chanell Lewis has been with her boyfriend for eight of her 22 years. There have been three children, and once there was a ring - until, in a moment of anger, Lewis did something with it that she doesn't like to talk about. Lewis says the couple probably will marry one day. But she is in no particular hurry. For one thing, her boyfriend needs steady work - not just a job, but a path to something lasting. "I'm not really thinking about it," she says. "Whenever he's ready, I'm ready." Lewis' story and those of other unmarried Baltimore men and women whose children remain on the welfare rolls illustrate the problems the Bush administration might have in translating its vision of promoting marriage to the streets.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and By David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
An imminent economic slump will test the resilience of Maryland's 6-year-old welfare reform program, state officials said yesterday. After years of decline, the state's welfare rolls have leveled off recently. But officials fear that the number of recipients could soon grow as unemployment rises and consumer confidence fades in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "You have to act with that possibility in mind," said Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg, a Baltimore Democrat who is co-chairman of the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Welfare Reform.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a fierce reaction to a measure that would drop hundreds of thousands of people from federal welfare rolls, House Democrats yesterday dismissed Republican welfare reform proposals as something out of "fiscal fantasy land.""Beneath all the tough talk, the Republican proposal does absolutely nothing to reform welfare," said House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, at a Capitol Hill news conference.As for the GOP proposal to roll some 50 welfare programs -- including the main one, Aid to Families with Dependent Children -- into block grants to the states, Mr. Gephardt said: "The Republicans just want to change the logos on the checks, cross their fingers and hope the problem goes away."
NEWS
By LAURA LIPPMAN | May 10, 1992
It is easy to discredit the White House attack on "failed" welfare programs. Within 24 hours of press secretary Marlin Fitzwater's statement blaming social programs for the conditions leading to the Los Angeles rioting, newspapers across the country already had spotted the logical flaws -- programs that work, such as Head Start; welfare reforms passed in the late 1980s; the fact that Republican presidents have controlled the White House for 20 of the past...
NEWS
October 21, 1999
Two hundred city welfare recipients and noncustodial parents will participate in job training, placement and retention programs under a federal grant of about $1.2 million awarded recently to the Enterprise Foundation's "Ready, Work, Grow" program.Participants must live in Cherry Hill, Druid Heights, Sandtown-Winchester, Washington Village/Pigtown or East Baltimore-Midway; be registered with the Department of Social Services; or be the father of a child whose mother receives welfare.For participation in the program, Enterprise Baltimore has targeted three community development corporations -- Tri-Churches Housing Inc., Cherry Hill New Creations and Druid Heights CDC -- and six employment service providers -- EDEN Jobs, Genesis Jobs, Washington Village/Pigtown Family Support and Career Center, Damascus Career Center, Payne Memorial Outreach Inc. and Sylvan Learning Systems.
NEWS
June 16, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Chicago Tribune, which was published Monday.THE General Accounting Office study of welfare programs in 17 states has found that the number of adults who have found work after leaving public aid is much larger than previously reported.Between 63 percent and 87 percent, depending on the state, had a job at some point after leaving welfare, the study found.That's good news, no doubt the result of the happy convergence of the new approach to welfare and the powerful, long-running economic boom in which joblessness, like welfare rolls, has fallen to its lowest level since the mid-1960s.
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