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Welfare Plan

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NEWS
By Jason DeParle and Jason DeParle,New York Times News Service | January 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's pledge to make welfare recipients work could require a much larger public jobs program than previously acknowledged, according to a confidential paper that is the subject of sharp dispute inside the administration.A preliminary estimate prepared by the Department of Health and Human Services suggests that 2.3 million people could be subject to the work requirements when the program is fully implemented. To put them all to work would require three to four times the number of jobs the administration appears willing to create.
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NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
As Howard County's welfare caseload continues to dwindle, social service officials are stepping up efforts to keep people off welfare through a number of job training and mentor programs.Later this year, Howard's Department of Social Services will enact the second phase of its welfare reform initiative by offering on-the-job training classes designed to take former welfare recipients to a higher level and help them earn salary increases and promotions.Officials hope to build on the success of current initiatives such as the welfare avoidance grant program, a state effort to move people toward financial independence.
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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1994
Decrying the welfare system as a form of "slavery" that can rob people of their incentive to succeed, the Maryland NAACP has endorsed in principle a Schaefer administration welfare-reform plan.But the Maryland State Conference of NAACP Branches, which is to release a letter to Gov. William Donald Schaefer today, stopped short of backing the most controversial element of the governor's plan: a "family cap" that would deny additional benefits to mothers who have babies while receiving public assistance.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It is illegal for a company to contract out employees' jobs, and then fire the workers, in order to eliminate their health and welfare benefits, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously yesterday.Clearing up a dispute among lower courts, the justices said that health and welfare benefits receive as much protection under federal law from being terminated as do pension rights.The decision overturned a federal appeals court ruling that said that because vested pension rights are guaranteed but other benefits are not, the employer need not maintain those other benefits when it hires someone else to do the workers' jobs.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's plan to overhaul the welfare system could cost much more in the long run than previously disclosed, possibly adding $58 billion to the nation's welfare costs over 10 years, according to a confidential memorandum presented to Mr. Clinton.The document also says Mr. Clinton should understand that "in rare circumstances" his plan to enforce a two-year limit on welfare benefits could leave families "homeless or unable to care for their children."The memorandum, drafted by the 32 members of the administration's working group on welfare, provides the most detailed information yet about the tough decisions Mr. Clinton faces in trying to fulfill one of his most popular campaign pledges.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As he had promised, President Clinton last night vetoed a sweeping Republican plan to overhaul the nation's welfare programs and end the federal guarantee of aid to the poor.The veto was politically risky for Mr. Clinton, since the Republican initiative has broad public support and the president ran for election on a pledge to "end welfare as we know it."But Mr. Clinton argued that the Republican blueprint would be too harsh on children because it would, among other things, cut money for disabled children and provide too little aid for child care for parents who get off welfare and take jobs.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, reinserting himself into the welfare debate, said yesterday that Republican reform plans were still too tough on innocent children and too soft on nonworking recipients and nonpaying parents.While praising Republicans for incorporating many of his suggestions in plans to toughen child-support enforcement, the president criticized their reluctance to revoke the professional and drivers' licenses of those with overdue child support."We've got to send a loud signal: No parent in America has a right to walk away from the responsibility to raise their children," Mr. Clinton said in a speech before the National Association of Counties.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Two top Clinton administration officials responsible for welfare policy resigned yesterday, saying they could not support the bill President Clinton signed.The resignations come as states struggle to sort out how to implement a bill that means more state control over welfare programs, less federal money and greater expectations to put people to work.They also add to the appearance of a liberal exodus from the Department of Health and Human Services as the administration moderates social policy.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Vowing to end "cash-inducements to teen-agers who have children they know they cannot afford to raise," House Republicans proposed yesterday to turn welfare over to the states and end the New Deal guarantee that anyone who qualifies can collect benefits.The sweeping legislation would also require welfare recipients to work; end cash payments to the "able-bodied" after five years; deny welfare to most legal immigrants; increase efforts to find "dead-beat dads"; halt disability payments to drug addicts and alcoholics; and tighten eligibility criteria for the children's disability program.
NEWS
By Jason DeParle and Jason DeParle,New York Times News Service | December 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's task force on welfare reform has translated his pledge to "end welfare as we know it" into a plan to spend significant new sums on child care, work and training programs. But the group says its ambitious goals can be entirely financed by cuts or savings in welfare or other programs for the needy.The draft plan was completed 12 days ago and is subject to revisions before it is presented to Clinton. The confidential plan reiterates his pledge to impose a two-year limit on welfare benefits, after which recipients would have to enroll in a work program or face financial penalties.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1996
In a closed-door meeting with religious leaders yesterday, Gov. Parris N. Glendening refused to suspend Maryland's welfare reform plan, prompting clerics to call for churches and other non-profit organizations not to aid the effort."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Key Maryland lawmakers are hoping to require drug tests for welfare applicants and to withhold benefits from those who continue to abuse drugs after entering a treatment program.Members of the legislature's Joint Committee on Welfare Reform said yesterday that they will push a bill in the coming session of the General Assembly to require the tests -- an effort to ensure that money from the welfare program is used to benefit children and not to buy drugs.If it becomes law, the Maryland program will be one of the most far-reaching attempts to prevent taxpayer money from being used to support a drug habit.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Two top Clinton administration officials responsible for welfare policy resigned yesterday, saying they could not support the bill President Clinton signed.The resignations come as states struggle to sort out how to implement a bill that means more state control over welfare programs, less federal money and greater expectations to put people to work.They also add to the appearance of a liberal exodus from the Department of Health and Human Services as the administration moderates social policy.
NEWS
May 21, 1996
WELFARE POLICY, perhaps the issue that best encapsulates citizen frustration with Washington, rockets to the top of the political charts this week as both President Clinton and Bob Dole visit Wisconsin, the state whose Republican reform plan has won Mr. Clinton's calculated endorsement. Mr. Dole is expected to counter-punch today with a call for mandatory drug testing of welfare recipients and a strict five-year limit on cash assistance. Mr. Clinton's response Thursday will predictably be aimed at out-maneuvering his GOP opponents.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Under attack by Sen. Bob Dole for having twice vetoed welfare legislation, President Clinton gave his blessing yesterday to the most radical of all state welfare experiments, which would abolish the federal guarantee of cash assistance for poor children in Wisconsin and replace it with wage subsidies for single mothers who work.The program, which has been hailed as an innovative way to move people from welfare to work, was devised mainly by Gov. Tommy G. Thompson of Wisconsin, a Republican often mentioned as a possible running mate for Dole in this year's presidential election.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- House Democrats yesterday sharply criticized a package of welfare proposals endorsed unanimously this month by members of the National Governors' Association, including 18 Democrats.At a hearing of the House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Human Resources, Republicans praised the governors' proposals.Rep. E. Clay Shaw Jr. of Florida, panel chairman, said the governors "rode into town in the darkest days of winter and breathed life back into a welfare reform debate that was on life support."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton now has a report from his task force on how to fulfill his campaign promise to "end welfare as we know it" by making welfare a second chance rather than a way of life.The goals are easy for everyone to endorse. But the real message in the report is that the road to welfare reform is blocked by enormous political obstacles -- imposing enough, in fact, so that the chances of promulgating the program this year seem extremely slim.The essence of the plan is the proposal on which candidate Bill Clinton ran for the presidency two years ago when he used the issue as one of his prime bona fides in demonstrating that he was a "new Democrat" and not another lineal descendant of tax-and-spend liberals.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell,Sun Staff Writers | January 27, 1995
As the new Republican majority in Congress begins its effort to slash Social Security's troubled $65 billion disability plan, there already are signs that political pressure is being felt that could jeopardize serious reform.Two decades of rule changes ordered by Congress have turned a pair of modest programs for disabled workers and poor people into America's most generous welfare plan -- a cash handout that is expected to cost $96 billion by the year 2000. The most alarming growth has been among children, immigrants and drug addicts.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Marilyn McCraven contributed to this article | February 9, 1996
Welfare advocates yesterday applauded many of the goals of Parris N. Glendening's proposal to overhaul Maryland's welfare system, but raised questions about whether the program could achieve its objective of putting people back to work.The governor's proposal would set a five-year lifetime limit on cash payments to the poor and require recipients to find work in two years, or else be placed by the state into community service jobs.Under the plan, local social service offices would be given the flexibility to design their own programs to help put welfare recipients in jobs.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As he had promised, President Clinton last night vetoed a sweeping Republican plan to overhaul the nation's welfare programs and end the federal guarantee of aid to the poor.The veto was politically risky for Mr. Clinton, since the Republican initiative has broad public support and the president ran for election on a pledge to "end welfare as we know it."But Mr. Clinton argued that the Republican blueprint would be too harsh on children because it would, among other things, cut money for disabled children and provide too little aid for child care for parents who get off welfare and take jobs.
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