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NEWS
December 6, 1995
A 28-year-old Westminster woman accused of illegally receiving more than $12,000 in welfare payments was arrested Monday morning by Westminster police.According to city police, the woman made false statements to the Westminster Office of Housing and Community Development.In addition, police said she didn't tell the housing office about changes in her household that would have made her ineligible for welfare payments.Police said the woman received $12,729 in welfare payments she was not entitled to from Oct. 1, 1993, to June 30, 1995.
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NEWS
October 24, 2012
David L. Warnock, chairman of the Center for Urban Families, bemoans the fact that dads released from jail accrue thousands of dollars' worth of child-support debt and have no way ever to get square, having earned no income while incarcerated and having a bleak chance of being gainfully employed in the future ("Hurting dads, hurting kids," Oct. 21). Meanwhile, their children don't have the child support that has been awarded and live in poverty. He urges expansion and strengthening new programs that help these men reenter the workforce, and the lives of the children, in a way that allows them to work off their arrears and, eventually, to "have their arrears reduced to zero.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Moving a step closer to a long-delayed and potentially contentious debate over federal welfare reform, Senate Republicans yesterday peeled away a set of Democratic proposals designed to blunt the impact of the GOP's own, more stringent proposals.By a near-solid party line 54-45 vote, the Senate rejected a series of Democrat-backed amendments to the welfare package sponsored by Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas.And Mr. Dole suggested that Republicans are near agreement NTC on an alternative.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 1996
EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. -- In this Mississippi River city populated mostly by welfare mothers and their children, government is a lifeline, not a bad word.For a generation, East St. Louis has been a postmark of urban blight. To conservatives who live outside its borders, it serves as a shorthand for everything wrong with liberal solutions. Socially concerned liberals come here periodically to use the city as a canvas to paint stark pictures of the inequities of American life.Half the people in East St. Louis live in government housing, so federal bureaucrats are their landlords.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Staff Writer | February 27, 1992
Alan Keyes was hot.Del. Martha S. Klima, one of his opponents in the Republican primary for the U.S. Senate, had claimed he supports higher welfare payments. She even distributed a flier with his picture. He was steamed.He called a radio talk show yesterday to denounce the flier as an inexcusable, "total distortion" of his record. In an interview Tuesday night he condemned it as "a bald-faced lie.""You would have to question the fitness for public office of anyone who would say such a thing," he argued.
NEWS
October 24, 2012
David L. Warnock, chairman of the Center for Urban Families, bemoans the fact that dads released from jail accrue thousands of dollars' worth of child-support debt and have no way ever to get square, having earned no income while incarcerated and having a bleak chance of being gainfully employed in the future ("Hurting dads, hurting kids," Oct. 21). Meanwhile, their children don't have the child support that has been awarded and live in poverty. He urges expansion and strengthening new programs that help these men reenter the workforce, and the lives of the children, in a way that allows them to work off their arrears and, eventually, to "have their arrears reduced to zero.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 20, 1994
A closely watched Ohio program that docks or increases welfare payments to prod teen-age mothers into attending school is pushing more of these young women to complete high school, a study that is being made public today has found.The program, known as LEAP, an acronym for Learning, Earning and Parenting, has interested policy-makers because all current proposals to overhaul the welfare system require teen-age mothers to finish school. That requirement is based on the belief that better educational credentials will allow them to get off welfare and win better jobs.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening joined state legislative leaders yesterday to support a pilot welfare reform program that they said would help move people from dependence to work and keep poor families together.The program, which is pending before the General Assembly, would require some parents to find a job, perform community service or enroll in a job training and placement program within three months of going on the welfare rolls.To encourage families to stay together, the program would also allow households to continue to receive welfare payments even if the father worked more than 100 hours in one month.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
Abortion rights advocates in the state Senate are poised to renew their battle to allow poor women to terminate pregnancies at state expense.As a vehicle, they plan to use the controversial welfare reform bill, a major element in Gov. William Donald Schaefer's final legislative package.In the process, some lawmakers said, they run the risk of killing the entire welfare measure, an ambitious melange of inducements and sanctions designed to foster self-reliance in recipients and cut costs to the state.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | December 5, 1991
CITING a "lack of will to learn on the part of youngsters," a "lack of involvement on the part of parents" and a "lack of quality education in the classroom," Boyse Mosley declared that "public education as we know it is dead" and announced his retirement from the school system in June.Mosley, principal of Northwestern High School in the city, has been a proverbial thorn in the side of school officials for years. He proposed eliminating athletics from his school and using the money saved on remedial math and reading, withholding welfare payments from families on assistance whose children are chronically truant and establishing rigid dress codes for students and teachers alike.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1996
Anticipating statewide welfare reform, the Carroll County Department of Social Services outlined a new policy yesterday that will require most welfare applicants to look for work or face penalties.Beginning Friday, people seeking cash grants through Aid to Families With Dependent Children (AFDC) must apply for five jobs a week while waiting for their applications to be processed, which typically takes a month.Applicants refusing to participate in a job search could lose part of their monthly AFDC money.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton vowed when he ran for president to "end welfare as we know it," but when he got a gander at congressional Republicans' version of welfare overhaul yesterday he promptly promised to veto it."I am determined to work with Congress to achieve real, bipartisan welfare reform," the president said. "But this welfare bill includes deep cuts that are tough on children and at odds with my central goal of moving people from welfare to work."Mr. Clinton's decision has the practical effect of combining the welfare issue with the stalled budget talks.
NEWS
December 6, 1995
A 28-year-old Westminster woman accused of illegally receiving more than $12,000 in welfare payments was arrested Monday morning by Westminster police.According to city police, the woman made false statements to the Westminster Office of Housing and Community Development.In addition, police said she didn't tell the housing office about changes in her household that would have made her ineligible for welfare payments.Police said the woman received $12,729 in welfare payments she was not entitled to from Oct. 1, 1993, to June 30, 1995.
NEWS
By JOHN W. FRECE and JOHN W. FRECE,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
Maryland is preparing to cut welfare benefits to poor families by 10 percent to 30 percent beginning Jan. 1 as the state absorbs "the first wave" of anticipated federal budget cuts, state Human Resources Secretary Alvin C. Collins said yesterday.The exact amount of the reduction will depend on which of two welfare reform bills pending in Congress -- or some compromise version of the two -- is ultimately signed into law by President Clinton, Mr. Collins said.He made clear, however, that even under the "best case" scenario, grants to the 80,000 Maryland families who receive monthly benefits from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program will be cut by 10 percent.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Moving a step closer to a long-delayed and potentially contentious debate over federal welfare reform, Senate Republicans yesterday peeled away a set of Democratic proposals designed to blunt the impact of the GOP's own, more stringent proposals.By a near-solid party line 54-45 vote, the Senate rejected a series of Democrat-backed amendments to the welfare package sponsored by Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas.And Mr. Dole suggested that Republicans are near agreement NTC on an alternative.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 27, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Brushing aside Democratic objections, Republicans on the Senate Finance Committee completed work yesterday on a bill that moves Congress a step closer to ending the 60-year-old guarantee that anyone who qualifies can receive welfare benefits.Like similar legislation passed by the House, the Senate measure would make a fundamental change in the nation's welfare policy by turning over to the states control of aid to poor families with children and capping federal spending.The bill was approved, 12-8, with one Democrat, Sen. Max Baucus of Montana, joining the 11 Republicans on the committee in voting for it. Sen. Bob Packwood, a Republican from Oregon, said he hopes to bring it to the Senate floor next month.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A key House committee agreed to slash welfare spending by $35 billion yesterday in a sweeping Republican proposal that would end the 6-decade-old guarantee cash payments to anyone who qualifies.As part of their proposed overhaul of the welfare system, GOP members of the Ways and Means Committee approved dropping nearly 1 million people -- including 225,000 children -- from Social Security disability rolls, producing $20 billion of the savings, which would accumulate over five years.
NEWS
May 26, 1995
Question of FactsJohn O'Donnell's May 16 article repeats the GOP propaganda line by quoting Sen. Lauch Faircloth: "The root cause of the problems in welfare . . . is children born out of wedlock. If we don't address this, we're simply never going to reduce welfare dependency."Mr. O'Donnell then goes on to quote Sen. Phil Gramm: "We have got to stop giving people more and more money to have more and more children."Why did not Mr. O'Donnell bother to mention that this line of reasoning is based on scholarship which was recanted by its author, Charles Murray, a year ago?
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening joined state legislative leaders yesterday to support a pilot welfare reform program that they said would help move people from dependence to work and keep poor families together.The program, which is pending before the General Assembly, would require some parents to find a job, perform community service or enroll in a job training and placement program within three months of going on the welfare rolls.To encourage families to stay together, the program would also allow households to continue to receive welfare payments even if the father worked more than 100 hours in one month.
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