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By Los Angeles Times | December 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A 1988 law designed to transform the nation's welfare system from a permanent support system into a temporary safety net has fallen far short of its goal of helping recipients find jobs, the General Accounting Office of Congress reported yesterday.In a separate study, a conservative polling organization said the public overwhelmingly supports the concept of welfare reform, but strongly resists many of the key elements of the welfare initiative contained in the House GOP's "Contract with America."
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2004
WASHINGTON -- In a trend that has surprised many experts, the federal welfare rolls have declined over the past three years, even as unemployment, poverty and the number of food stamp recipients have surged in a weak economy. After Congress overhauled the nation's welfare system in 1996, the number of families receiving benefits dropped much faster than federal and state officials had expected. Even more remarkable, officials say, the rolls did not grow during the recession of 2001 or the sluggish economy since.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- State officials have concluded that many options given to them by the new welfare law conflict with long-standing interpretations of the U.S. Constitution and state constitutions.But in its first actions under the law, the Clinton administration has indicated that it will approve state welfare plans even if it believes that some of their elements violate the U.S. Constitution.Last Monday, the administration gave a green light to Wisconsin and Michigan, saying that they were eligible to run their own programs with lump sums of federal money significantly larger than they would have received under the old welfare law.But the administration raised constitutional questions about both state plans.
NEWS
September 2, 2003
WHAT DOES IT mean when applications for welfare spike in the affluent suburbs? Are these cases, like dead canaries in coal mines, signals of impending disaster? For the working poor who have lost their jobs and can't find new ones, disaster is all too obvious. And it may be closer for other families struggling through a jobless economic recovery. Unemployment benefits are running out for millions, so some families are turning to welfare for help. It's not surprising, then, to see the increases in welfare cases reported in many Maryland counties by The Sun's Larry Carson.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Critics of the watershed welfare law of 1996 forecast any number of problems, from starving children to dwindling benefits to Depression-era soup lines. But virtually no one imagined the strange new condition startling the experts coast to coast: States have more federal money, literally, than they know how to spend.That is because the welfare rolls have dropped dramatically while federal financing remains, by law, fixed at historic highs.Consider Wisconsin's version of the new welfare math.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- It sounds simple. The federal government will impose a five-year lifetime limit on welfare payments to any family, starting no later than July. But state and federal officials say it will be months, probably years, before they have the computer capability to enforce such restrictions throughout the country.That is just one example of the practical problems that officials have discovered as they study the bill overhauling welfare that President Clinton signed Aug. 22.To comply with the new rules, they must create national computer systems to collect information from every state on welfare recipients, on people who owe child support and on all newly hired employees.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge has ruled that states may not discriminate against new residents by paying them lower welfare benefits than longtime residents. His decision blocks Pennsylvania's use of a tool given to states by the 1996 welfare law.The decision has broad implications for other states that have adopted similar restrictions.Judge Clarence Newcomer of the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia said such disparate treatment violated the Constitution because it was not rationally related to any legitimate government purpose.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1997
Alicia Garza Burton of Hyattsville wasn't worried when President Clinton signed the new welfare law last year, the one that threatens benefits to Burton and other legal immigrants unless they become citizens.A 64-year-old disabled widow who arrived here from Mexico in 1949, Burton survives on a monthly Supplemental Security Income (SSI) check. Yet when the law was enacted, she told friends: "Let sleeping dogs lie." Sister Mary Wendeln, a Catholic nun who works with low-income Hispanics in Maryland, replied: "Honey, this dog isn't sleeping."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- State officials are discovering that the work requirements of the new welfare law are much less onerous than they first believed.The work requirements will be substantially reduced for any state that reduces the number of families receiving welfare, compared with the total in the 1995 fiscal year, and that number is already way down in most states. Thus a state can comply with the law by putting some people to work and by simply removing others from the rolls, regardless of whether they find jobs.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Republican-led House began debate yesterday on a measure backed by President Bush that would stiffen the work requirements imposed by the landmark 1996 welfare law. The bill appears likely to win approval today, though it is almost certain to be reshaped in the Democrat-led Senate. Centrists in the Senate want to provide more money for child care and for education and training, which they say are needed to help those who leave welfare stay out of poverty. Republicans hope the House debate on how to extend the 1996 welfare law will help them reap some political benefit.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Republican-led House began debate yesterday on a measure backed by President Bush that would stiffen the work requirements imposed by the landmark 1996 welfare law. The bill appears likely to win approval today, though it is almost certain to be reshaped in the Democrat-led Senate. Centrists in the Senate want to provide more money for child care and for education and training, which they say are needed to help those who leave welfare stay out of poverty. Republicans hope the House debate on how to extend the 1996 welfare law will help them reap some political benefit.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - In the six years since Congress directed the states to start moving welfare recipients off the dole and into full-time jobs, Maryland has been among the most successful. Its welfare caseload has dropped nearly 70 percent since 1995, compared with a national average of about 60 percent. But the proportion of Marylanders still on welfare who are meeting the federal requirement that they engage in some work or related activity is nothing to boast about: just 6.3 percent. The national rate is 34 percent.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Critics of the watershed welfare law of 1996 forecast any number of problems, from starving children to dwindling benefits to Depression-era soup lines. But virtually no one imagined the strange new condition startling the experts coast to coast: States have more federal money, literally, than they know how to spend.That is because the welfare rolls have dropped dramatically while federal financing remains, by law, fixed at historic highs.Consider Wisconsin's version of the new welfare math.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Billions of dollars in federal welfare money is piling up in the Treasury, unused by state officials, who won control of the money in 1996 by arguing that they knew best how to spend it for the benefit of poor people.More than half the states failed to use the full amounts of their federal welfare grants last year, federal and state officials say. Data compiled by the Department of Health and Human Services show that states had an unused balance of $3 billion, out of $12 billion made available in the first nine months of last year.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, taking its first look at the 1996 welfare reform law, appeared poised yesterday to block states from giving less assistance to some new residents than to long-term residents.At a hearing on the constitutionality of a "two-tier" system of welfare payments, most of the justices made negative comments and aggressively questioned a Clinton administration attorney and a lawyer for California who tried to defend that approach.Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, noting that the court has ruled that states cannot discriminate against new state residents, told U.S. Solicitor General Seth P. Waxman, "I don't see how the federal government can do it, anymore than a state could."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | December 11, 1998
Despite fears that thousands of Marylanders would be thrown off welfare Jan. 1 for failing to get ready for work, the number is actually much less -- hundreds at the most.Almost 10,000 Maryland families, one-quarter of the state's entire caseload, are the first to face the federal time limits of welfare reform. The vast majority have enrolled in some type of work program that will allow them to continue to collect their monthly payments, at least for a few more years.The clock is ticking for the 1,117 welfare recipients who have ignored or missed two years of warnings to enter work programs.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
In its continued effort to smooth the transition from welfare to work, Baltimore County is matching local employers with job seekers trying to get off public assistance.The latest step comes today in Randallstown, with the first of what could be a series of employer seminars intended "to help smooth out the job search process," said Nicholas J. D'Alesandro, community liaison for the county's Department of Social Services.Fourteen employers have signed up for the session at Liberty Family Resource Center, including Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson and Martin's Caterers.
NEWS
September 2, 2003
WHAT DOES IT mean when applications for welfare spike in the affluent suburbs? Are these cases, like dead canaries in coal mines, signals of impending disaster? For the working poor who have lost their jobs and can't find new ones, disaster is all too obvious. And it may be closer for other families struggling through a jobless economic recovery. Unemployment benefits are running out for millions, so some families are turning to welfare for help. It's not surprising, then, to see the increases in welfare cases reported in many Maryland counties by The Sun's Larry Carson.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge has ruled that states may not discriminate against new residents by paying them lower welfare benefits than longtime residents. His decision blocks Pennsylvania's use of a tool given to states by the 1996 welfare law.The decision has broad implications for other states that have adopted similar restrictions.Judge Clarence Newcomer of the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia said such disparate treatment violated the Constitution because it was not rationally related to any legitimate government purpose.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
In its continued effort to smooth the transition from welfare to work, Baltimore County is matching local employers with job seekers trying to get off public assistance.The latest step comes today in Randallstown, with the first of what could be a series of employer seminars intended "to help smooth out the job search process," said Nicholas J. D'Alesandro, community liaison for the county's Department of Social Services.Fourteen employers have signed up for the session at Liberty Family Resource Center, including Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson and Martin's Caterers.
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