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NEWS
By Cecil Johnson | October 11, 1994
Fort Worth -- THE NEW politics of race is not rattlesnake venomous with vituperation, as it was in decades past, but it rattles its message through to those who know the buzzwords.Sometimes, of course, the rattling is so blatant as to leave no doubt about the nature of the poison being injected into the arteries of public opinion. The Willie Horton ad run repeatedly during the George Bush/Michael Dukakis presidential contest was a classic case of putting a black face on everyone's worst nightmare.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2001
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University and University of Maryland are concerned that a recent state court decision meant to protect children in medical experiments could have the side effect of limiting research into childhood illnesses. The Maryland Court of Appeals criticized a Johns Hopkins scientific review board Aug. 16 for its "ethically wrong" approval of a lead paint experiment from 1993 to 1995 that might have resulted in lead poisoning in two children. The ruling allows the parents of the two children to sue the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which is affiliated with Hopkins and directed the study of more than 100 homes contaminated with varying levels of lead paint.
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NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
Republican gubernatorial candidate Helen Delich Bentley said yesterday that she would cut off welfare benefits to recipients convicted of a felony or any crime involving illicit drugs.Unveiling a welfare reform plan six days before the primary election, Mrs. Bentley would also deny increased benefits to mothers who have additional children while on the welfare rolls and require recipients to go to work after receiving cash benefits for two years.Both those elements are similar to proposals pushed by Democratic Gov. William Donald Schaefer, to whom Mrs. Bentley gave credit, and previously espoused by her closest GOP rival, state Del. Ellen R. Sauerbrey.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 4, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The highly charged question of what strings the government can attach to the use of federal money reached the Supreme Court again yesterday, this time in the context of legal services for the poor. The court agreed to decide whether Congress violated the First Amendment when it restricted the kinds of arguments that lawyers supported by the Legal Services Corp. can make on behalf of clients seeking welfare benefits. Under the restriction, the lawyers can help clients who are seeking to receive or restore specific welfare benefits but may not become involved in "an effort to amend or otherwise challenge existing law."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 9, 1995
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- President Clinton defended affirmative action yesterday and attacked the House & 2/3 Republicans' welfare plan, threatening a veto unless it is changed to provide more job training and education.At the same time, Mr. Clinton re-affirmed his commitment both to reviewing programs that give preferences to women and minorities and to an overhaul of the welfare system.In a speech to the California Democratic Party convention, and in his weekly radio address, he continued the effort he began Friday to use Congress' recess as an opportunity to sketch out lines of compromise and confrontation with Republicans in the battles to come.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In his 1992 campaign for the presidency, candidate Bill Clinton took two significant steps to achieve a critical breakthrough with white working-class voters -- the so-called Reagan Democrats, meaning those nominal Democrats who had voted twice for Ronald Reagan and once for George Bush for president.The first Clinton move was the decision to deliberately affront Jesse Jackson in the controversy over rap singer Sister Souljah and thus distinguish himself from his two immediate predecessors as the Democratic nominee for president, Walter F. Mondale and Michael S. Dukakis.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- If there is a single issue with the potential to define the new relationship between President Clinton and the Republican majority in Congress, it is welfare reform. It could be revealing.Clinton used the welfare issue to define himself as a "new Democrat" -- as opposed to another liberal in the tradition of Walter Mondale and Michael Dukakis -- to win the presidency in 1992. Working-class Democrats approved when he talked about ending welfare as we know it" and requiring "responsibility" on the part of recipients.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | January 16, 1995
Washington. -- Along with its shift in rules and the bid to pass a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution, the new Republican majority on Capitol Hill is moving with lightning speed to effect a historic shift of power from Washington to the states.Significant action is coming almost daily. Consider for example unfunded mandates -- Congress' habit of imposing social and environmental regulations without paying the increased costs incurred by state and local governments.An anti-mandate bill was introduced opening day January 4, got a Senate hearing January 5, was set for House floor debate within a week with congressional leaders saying they expected both houses' approval before President Clinton's State of the Union address January 24.But anti-mandate legislation alone leaves the governors uneasy -- worried, as Republican Gov. George Voinovich of Ohio puts it, that the states may be victims of ''shift and shaft,'' whereby Congress tries to balance the federal budget by mandating more and more costs to the states.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's success in winning approval for the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) tells us absolutely nothing about his likely relationship with Congress over the next two years. On the contrary, it may have sent a misleading signal.This was an easy one. Once Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole signed on behind the agreement last month, there was never any serious doubt that GATT would be approved routinely, although the conspicuously concentrated efforts by the White House to nail down votes may have created some contrived suspense among the uninitiated.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- If President Clinton has learned to play the inside game of politics here, as the conventional wisdom has it, he will have ample opportunity to prove it as he tries to steer a welfare reform program through Congress.Of all the issues on the president's activist agenda, none is as politically complex and sensitive as welfare reform. Nor is the handling of any issue as likely to define Clinton as welfare.For two decades now, Republicans have used the welfare issue to depict Democrats as fuzzy liberals with no respect for the way the taxpayers' money is wasted on those who don't work for a living.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | January 24, 1999
If you can work for a living, you should support yourself. And, if you work full-time, you should earn a living wage. These two bedrock beliefs one seemingly conservative, the other liberal, sum up what most Americans think about the intricate, intertwined, and emotionally-charged issues of work, wages and welfare. And they explain why public policies are being shaped by two trends enjoying broad public support but espoused by political leaders from different ends of the ideological spectrum.
NEWS
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER Knight-Ridder/Tribune Information Services | January 5, 1997
She has evolved, this creature who jokingly calls herself "the ++ Mighty Afro-Deity," from the girl born Caryn to the life forcecalled Whoopi. She has gone from welfare mom to philanthropist, from street performer to movie star, from sham spiritualist Oda Mae Brown in "Ghost" to real-life civil rights activist Myrlie Evers in the new film "Ghosts of Mississippi."This crowded week, she will emcee an AIDS benefit at Manhattan's Riverside Church, meet reporters for "Ghosts of Mississippi," and begin rehearsals for her return to Broadway in February, when she will replace Nathan Lane in "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum."
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Ever since Ronald Reagan began excoriating ''the welfare queen'' a generation ago, politicians have recognized the volatility of the welfare issue with American voters.The ''queen'' was a Chicago woman said to be collecting multilple welfare checks under different names -- and picking them up in a limousine. Her story, and many others like it, fed the resentment of middle-class taxpayers tired of seeing their money support others.Resentment has grown as evidence accumulates of whole generations of the poor living on welfare while taxes rise.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Diana K. Sugg contributed to this article | April 8, 1996
With their annual 90-day session winding down to its final hours, members of the Maryland General Assembly face a host of issues to resolve before they adjourn at midnight tonight.Like schoolchildren reluctant to tackle tough homework, legislators have put off final decisions on some of their most complex and politically difficult topics. The bills they could act on today cover a broad range from wilderness preservation and recycling industrial land to Medicaid and welfare reform.In a session where headlines have been grabbed by professional football stadiums, gun control and gambling, these are the less-than-sexy bills that have gained less attention but are no less important.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton vowed when he ran for president to "end welfare as we know it," but when he got a gander at congressional Republicans' version of welfare overhaul yesterday he promptly promised to veto it."I am determined to work with Congress to achieve real, bipartisan welfare reform," the president said. "But this welfare bill includes deep cuts that are tough on children and at odds with my central goal of moving people from welfare to work."Mr. Clinton's decision has the practical effect of combining the welfare issue with the stalled budget talks.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 9, 1995
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- President Clinton defended affirmative action yesterday and attacked the House & 2/3 Republicans' welfare plan, threatening a veto unless it is changed to provide more job training and education.At the same time, Mr. Clinton re-affirmed his commitment both to reviewing programs that give preferences to women and minorities and to an overhaul of the welfare system.In a speech to the California Democratic Party convention, and in his weekly radio address, he continued the effort he began Friday to use Congress' recess as an opportunity to sketch out lines of compromise and confrontation with Republicans in the battles to come.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Ever since Ronald Reagan began excoriating ''the welfare queen'' a generation ago, politicians have recognized the volatility of the welfare issue with American voters.The ''queen'' was a Chicago woman said to be collecting multilple welfare checks under different names -- and picking them up in a limousine. Her story, and many others like it, fed the resentment of middle-class taxpayers tired of seeing their money support others.Resentment has grown as evidence accumulates of whole generations of the poor living on welfare while taxes rise.
NEWS
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER Knight-Ridder/Tribune Information Services | January 5, 1997
She has evolved, this creature who jokingly calls herself "the ++ Mighty Afro-Deity," from the girl born Caryn to the life forcecalled Whoopi. She has gone from welfare mom to philanthropist, from street performer to movie star, from sham spiritualist Oda Mae Brown in "Ghost" to real-life civil rights activist Myrlie Evers in the new film "Ghosts of Mississippi."This crowded week, she will emcee an AIDS benefit at Manhattan's Riverside Church, meet reporters for "Ghosts of Mississippi," and begin rehearsals for her return to Broadway in February, when she will replace Nathan Lane in "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum."
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | January 16, 1995
Washington. -- Along with its shift in rules and the bid to pass a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution, the new Republican majority on Capitol Hill is moving with lightning speed to effect a historic shift of power from Washington to the states.Significant action is coming almost daily. Consider for example unfunded mandates -- Congress' habit of imposing social and environmental regulations without paying the increased costs incurred by state and local governments.An anti-mandate bill was introduced opening day January 4, got a Senate hearing January 5, was set for House floor debate within a week with congressional leaders saying they expected both houses' approval before President Clinton's State of the Union address January 24.But anti-mandate legislation alone leaves the governors uneasy -- worried, as Republican Gov. George Voinovich of Ohio puts it, that the states may be victims of ''shift and shaft,'' whereby Congress tries to balance the federal budget by mandating more and more costs to the states.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's success in winning approval for the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) tells us absolutely nothing about his likely relationship with Congress over the next two years. On the contrary, it may have sent a misleading signal.This was an easy one. Once Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole signed on behind the agreement last month, there was never any serious doubt that GATT would be approved routinely, although the conspicuously concentrated efforts by the White House to nail down votes may have created some contrived suspense among the uninitiated.
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