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NEWS
January 19, 2000
This is an excerpt of a Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial, which was published Jan. 4. EVER since governors began creating "widows' pensions" in the 19th century, Americans have struggled between two views of public assistance for needy families. One sees welfare as a compassionate, even essential, lifeline to families who fall on hard times. The other says that welfare winds up rewarding the irresponsible and entrapping the indolent. The latter view gained favor in America during the early 1990s -- in part because the nation's welfare rolls were rising sharply, and in part because Americans had grown skeptical of government antipoverty efforts.
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NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | August 15, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Ten years have passed since President Bill Clinton signed a tough welfare-reform law. I feared the worst. It feels good to be wrong. The worst has not happened, but the success is mixed. Mr. Clinton signed the law, with Republican support, to fulfill a campaign promise to "end welfare as we know it" and to make welfare "a second chance, not a way of life." The law was not as tough as two Republican-based bills that Mr. Clinton vetoed that would have cut Medicaid, child care and other benefits for those moving from welfare to work.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1999
Maryland cuts welfare benefits more quickly than most other states, giving less of a chance to those making the transition from welfare to work, according to a new study that places the state near the bottom in the nation.State officials take pride in having reduced their caseload sharply since welfare reform went into effect, from 227,887 recipients in January 1995 to 96,055 last month.Many other states, including Alabama and New Jersey, allow welfare recipients to keep part or all of their government aid for a while after they start work.
NEWS
By Sandra J. Skolnik | September 28, 2003
IN EVERY corner of Maryland, there are families who struggle each day to go to work and afford quality child care. Parents want the best environment for their young children, but for many families, good child care is simply too expensive. Their child-care arrangements are often unstable and they don't know how they will go to work if those arrangements fall apart. Maryland's 12 regional Child Care Resource Centers, which operate under a state contract administered by the nonprofit Maryland Committee for Children, see families face these questions daily.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff writer | February 12, 1994
The governor's proposed welfare reforms will either end the cycle of poverty or hurt innocent children, depending on who is talking.The House Appropriations Committee heard both arguments in Annapolis yesterday from people who claim to have the interests of welfare families at heart.At issue was Gov. William Donald Schaefer's proposal to impose new limits on welfare benefits in an experimental effort to encourage recipients to be more self-sufficient.Under his pilot proposal, the state would no longer increase payments to women who, once they start receiving welfare, have more children.
NEWS
August 8, 1995
How's this for a mixed message from government: Need child care so you can keep your job? Too bad. Welfare mothers have first shot; if you're already working, you'll have to stand in line for a subsidized slot. In the meantime, good luck holding onto your job.After three years of mounting deficits in Maryland's program that provides welfare families and the working poor with financial aid for child care, the Department of Human Resources has proposed changes in regulations that should close a $7.8 million deficit projected for this fiscal year.
NEWS
August 25, 1995
In cutting back child care subsidies for low-income working families, the Department of Human Resources may be acting in a fiscally responsible manner to avoid a looming deficit. But in the larger scheme, the cuts illustrate the real dilemma of welfare reform -- a painful mixed message for hard-working parents struggling to stay off welfare themselves. Need child care so you can keep your job? Too bad. Welfare mothers have first shot; if you're already working, you'll have to stand in line for a subsidized slot.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1996
While many states are rushing to reshape their welfare systems, Gov. Parris N. Glendening's ambitious reform plan could be scaled back sharply in the Maryland General Assembly.Under pressure to prepare for a new federal law and major reductions in funding, Mr. Glendening asked the legislature to approve a five-year, lifetime limit on eligibility for cash payments, and a requirement that current recipients begin to seek work within two years.The bill proposes a system in which temporary cash relief and job placement services would be offered to head off long-term reliance on the public purse.
NEWS
June 16, 1994
"There's no greater gap between our good intentions and our misguided consequences than you see in the welfare system," President Clinton said in announcing his welfare reform package this week. He was speaking of the welfare system as we know it now, but the chances are good that the words would apply equally well if his complex proposal becomes law. Clearly, the welfare system is broken. What is not so clear is how to fix it without making things worse."Welfare reform" is a popular political mantra.
NEWS
By Sandra J. Skolnik | September 28, 2003
IN EVERY corner of Maryland, there are families who struggle each day to go to work and afford quality child care. Parents want the best environment for their young children, but for many families, good child care is simply too expensive. Their child-care arrangements are often unstable and they don't know how they will go to work if those arrangements fall apart. Maryland's 12 regional Child Care Resource Centers, which operate under a state contract administered by the nonprofit Maryland Committee for Children, see families face these questions daily.
NEWS
January 19, 2000
This is an excerpt of a Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial, which was published Jan. 4. EVER since governors began creating "widows' pensions" in the 19th century, Americans have struggled between two views of public assistance for needy families. One sees welfare as a compassionate, even essential, lifeline to families who fall on hard times. The other says that welfare winds up rewarding the irresponsible and entrapping the indolent. The latter view gained favor in America during the early 1990s -- in part because the nation's welfare rolls were rising sharply, and in part because Americans had grown skeptical of government antipoverty efforts.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1999
Maryland cuts welfare benefits more quickly than most other states, giving less of a chance to those making the transition from welfare to work, according to a new study that places the state near the bottom in the nation.State officials take pride in having reduced their caseload sharply since welfare reform went into effect, from 227,887 recipients in January 1995 to 96,055 last month.Many other states, including Alabama and New Jersey, allow welfare recipients to keep part or all of their government aid for a while after they start work.
NEWS
By Melissa Healy and Melissa Healy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 20, 1998
WASHINGTON - Delaware, one of the first states to implement a comprehensive welfare reform plan, has reported that two years later, welfare clients in the new program had higher work rates, greater earnings and lower welfare payments than a small group allowed to continue in the old Aid to Families with Dependent Children program.In the report, independent analysts suggested that Delaware's "A Better Chance," or ABC, program has demonstrated the effectiveness of short time limits on welfare eligibility, a clear work-first orientation and, in particular, an unsparing use of sanctions.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- At the stroke of midnight last night, 325 Connecticut residents peered into the dimness of their futures and saw something that many find truly frightening.For the first time, they're looking at a future without welfare.For these people, the first such group in the nation, the final bell has tolled. They came to the end of the line in one of the nation's boldest experiments in welfare reform: Connecticut's 21-month lifetime limit for receiving benefits.Both proponents and foes of welfare reform are watching Connecticut closely to see if the feared consequences of cutoffs -- homelessness, hunger, child abuse and neglect, interstate flight -- will materialize.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The first state in the nation to end the practice of increasing a welfare check when a recipient has another baby conceded yesterday that the policy has failed to reduce birthrates.The Rutgers University study leading to that conclusion, commissioned by the state of New Jersey, could deal a blow to the 20 other states that since have adopted "family caps." And it poses a challenge to conservatives who argued that a federally required cap is necessary for welfare reform to succeed nationally.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1996
While many states are rushing to reshape their welfare systems, Gov. Parris N. Glendening's ambitious reform plan could be scaled back sharply in the Maryland General Assembly.Under pressure to prepare for a new federal law and major reductions in funding, Mr. Glendening asked the legislature to approve a five-year, lifetime limit on eligibility for cash payments, and a requirement that current recipients begin to seek work within two years.The bill proposes a system in which temporary cash relief and job placement services would be offered to head off long-term reliance on the public purse.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- At the stroke of midnight last night, 325 Connecticut residents peered into the dimness of their futures and saw something that many find truly frightening.For the first time, they're looking at a future without welfare.For these people, the first such group in the nation, the final bell has tolled. They came to the end of the line in one of the nation's boldest experiments in welfare reform: Connecticut's 21-month lifetime limit for receiving benefits.Both proponents and foes of welfare reform are watching Connecticut closely to see if the feared consequences of cutoffs -- homelessness, hunger, child abuse and neglect, interstate flight -- will materialize.
NEWS
By Melissa Healy and Melissa Healy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 20, 1998
WASHINGTON - Delaware, one of the first states to implement a comprehensive welfare reform plan, has reported that two years later, welfare clients in the new program had higher work rates, greater earnings and lower welfare payments than a small group allowed to continue in the old Aid to Families with Dependent Children program.In the report, independent analysts suggested that Delaware's "A Better Chance," or ABC, program has demonstrated the effectiveness of short time limits on welfare eligibility, a clear work-first orientation and, in particular, an unsparing use of sanctions.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 11, 1996
ANNAPOLIS -- As so many of us have learned to hate the poor in this country, Gov. Parris Glendening wins big political points with last week's announcement that he wishes to overhaul welfare and make those lowlifes find jobs like the rest of us.Oops.Did somebody mention jobs?On the very day legislation was introduced here designed to force half of Maryland's welfare recipients to work for a living, more than 400 people gathered at the Richlin Ballroom in Edgewood, where they stood in an unemployment line for hours.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | September 14, 1995
Washington. -- As the welfare-reform debate begins to boil, the place to begin is with an elemental fact: No child in America asked to be here.Each was summoned into existence by the acts of adults. And no child is going to be spiritually improved by being collateral damage in a bombardment of severities targeted at adults who may or may not deserve more severe treatment from the welfare system.Phil Gramm says welfare recipients are people ''in the wagon'' who ought to get out and ''help the rest of us pull.
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