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Welfare Dependency

NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
When it comes to helping the homeless, students at St. Louis School say you've got to put your money where your math is.Not only did students from the Clarksville parochial school trudge door to door in the January chill to collect pledges of support for Churches Concerned for the Homeless, but they worked on 100 math problems in exchange for the money.The sum of their "Math-a-thon" was $6,517.61. That's $80.731716 squared, plus one one-hundredth of a cent on an eight-digit calculator."I was just overwhelmed with the amount of money raised, especially with the way the economy is today," said Sister Mary Catherine, the school's principal.
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NEWS
June 13, 1996
AMONG THE many disastrous legacies of the welfare dependency of the past three decades is the transformation of ** public housing from an accommodation of last resort to a permanent shelter for the poor. This changed the whole character of public housing. As poverty was concentrated and working poor moved elsewhere, formerly tidy high-rises became run-down warrens of crime and dysfunction.During his four years in Washington, President Clinton has taken decisive steps to reform public housing.
NEWS
March 26, 1993
Though the poverty gap between blacks and whites in Maryland narrowed significantly during the 1980s, the latest Census report shows blacks are still three times more likely to live in poverty than whites. The persistent economic gap between blacks and whites appears to be an intractable problem, affecting debate on issues from school funding and health care to welfare dependency, drug abuse and crime.No single factor is responsible for the gap. The loss of low-skill manufacturing jobs from urban areas, the increase in single-parent households over the last generation and the continuing legacy of racial discrimination all have contributed to the present crisis.
NEWS
July 25, 1996
IN THE LONG trek to welfare reform, the only thing harder to find than defenders of the status quo is consensus on how to change it. The goal of bills passed in recent days by the House and Senate is to increase self-sufficiency, but whether the measures will address the heart of the problem remains to be seen.No reform of welfare is worth the paper it is printed on unless it addresses the numbing dependency ingrained in families, especially over several generations. When Americans talk about the failures of the welfare system, they are not begrudging poor people food to eat or access to a doctor when sick.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Divorce and separation take a significant economic toll on American children, pushing many below the poverty line and increasing dependency on welfare programs, according to a Census Bureau report to be released today.The average income of the single-parent families created by divorce or separation falls by 37 percent within four months of the breakup, the study found, in almost all cases reflecting the financial impact of the father's departure from the family unit."This study is more dramatic confirmation of how far the standard of living falls after breakups," said Andrew J. Cherlin, a sociologist at the Johns Hopkins University and author of a book on divided families.
NEWS
September 17, 1993
Dr. Joycelyn Elders, the nation's new surgeon general, took office last week having made it clear that she intends to tackle some tough and controversial issues. At the top of her list is the country's epidemic of adolescent pregnancy, a problem Dr. Elders has targeted as a leading cause of poverty and a contributor to many other social ills, from infant mortality to welfare dependency. So far, however, the federal government has found no coherent or effective approach to the issue.One of the first challenges facing the new surgeon general is to define a national agenda for facing up to a problem that is putting increasing burdens on state and local governments.
NEWS
December 12, 1992
When Norplant first became available in this country in early 1991, family planning professionals hailed the implant as an important new contraceptive choice for women. And that's exactly the proper focus of the Baltimore City Norplant Consortium -- making it possible for women, in this case sexually active teen-aged girls, to consider a new contraceptive choice that otherwise would be too expensive.Formed recently by city Health Commissioner Peter Beilenson, the group of doctors, hospitals and foundations intends to provide information about Norplant to sexually active teen-agers, along with funding for those who choose to use it. The financial support is crucial, since the Norplant kit itself costs $365, plus the fee for insertion.
NEWS
April 14, 1996
MANY SUBURBAN residents are scared of what the impending relocation of up to 1,342 Baltimore public housing families will mean for them. The plan settles a racial discrimination suit by the American Civil Liberties Union against the Baltimore City Housing Authority.Some arguments against the relocation are rooted purely in prejudice and cannot be quelled with reason. Other opposition, however, is based on the genuine and rational fear that quality of life might be harmed by a well-intentioned but mismanaged program.
NEWS
February 8, 1994
In journeying to a junior high school in a beleaguered District of Columbia neighborhood, President Clinton struck a bigger blow against the universally reviled welfare system than a dozen detailed reform proposals.However you analyze the issue, you can't escape the fact that young, single mothers with no marketable skills will always need large doses of government help. The real challenge is not the pipe dream of designing the perfect welfare system, but finding ways to keep these precarious family units from being formed at all. That's a challenge better suited to the pulpit -- especially the bully pulpit of the presidency -- than to bureaucracy.
NEWS
May 19, 1996
FORGET ABOUT AFDC. There's a new acronym in town, FIP. Under a bill signed into law this week by Gov. Parris Glendening, Aid to Families with Dependent Children -- better known as "welfare" -- is being replaced by the Family Investment Program. The difference is stark. AFDC encourages dependency through welfare; FIP stresses self-sufficiency through work.Thus, Maryland joins 36 other states revamping their public assistance programs. So far, the nationwide movement away from traditional welfare seems to be working: Nearly 1.3 million Americans have left the rolls in just three years.
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