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Welfare Dependency

NEWS
April 14, 1996
MANY SUBURBAN residents are scared of what the impending relocation of up to 1,342 Baltimore public housing families will mean for them. The plan settles a racial discrimination suit by the American Civil Liberties Union against the Baltimore City Housing Authority.Some arguments against the relocation are rooted purely in prejudice and cannot be quelled with reason. Other opposition, however, is based on the genuine and rational fear that quality of life might be harmed by a well-intentioned but mismanaged program.
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NEWS
February 8, 1994
In journeying to a junior high school in a beleaguered District of Columbia neighborhood, President Clinton struck a bigger blow against the universally reviled welfare system than a dozen detailed reform proposals.However you analyze the issue, you can't escape the fact that young, single mothers with no marketable skills will always need large doses of government help. The real challenge is not the pipe dream of designing the perfect welfare system, but finding ways to keep these precarious family units from being formed at all. That's a challenge better suited to the pulpit -- especially the bully pulpit of the presidency -- than to bureaucracy.
NEWS
April 28, 1992
Can liberal and conservative views of crime, race and the deterioration of poor, inner-city communities over the last 20 years converge sufficiently to make possible a new policy consensus on addressing America's urban crisis? The urgency of such a consensus was dramatically underscored by a recent report which found that 42 percent of black men in the District of Columbia were somehow enmeshed in the criminal justice system on any given day in 1991 -- evidence of a social breakdown in the nation's center cities far more serious than previously acknowledged.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- With the debate over reducing the country's welfare rolls focusing renewed attention on the rising birthrate among unwed women, the Census Bureau reports that such births soared by more than 70 percent from 1983 to 1993.According to figures released by the bureau yesterday, 6.3 million children, or 27 percent of all children under the age of 18, lived in 1993 with a single parent who had never married, up from 3.7 million in 1983.The report showed that the annual increase in the number of children born out of wedlock slowed in the 1980s, but it also documented the sharp rise in these kinds of births over the past three decades.
NEWS
March 26, 1993
Though the poverty gap between blacks and whites in Maryland narrowed significantly during the 1980s, the latest Census report shows blacks are still three times more likely to live in poverty than whites. The persistent economic gap between blacks and whites appears to be an intractable problem, affecting debate on issues from school funding and health care to welfare dependency, drug abuse and crime.No single factor is responsible for the gap. The loss of low-skill manufacturing jobs from urban areas, the increase in single-parent households over the last generation and the continuing legacy of racial discrimination all have contributed to the present crisis.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Divorce and separation take a significant economic toll on American children, pushing many below the poverty line and increasing dependency on welfare programs, according to a Census Bureau report to be released today.The average income of the single-parent families created by divorce or separation falls by 37 percent within four months of the breakup, the study found, in almost all cases reflecting the financial impact of the father's departure from the family unit."This study is more dramatic confirmation of how far the standard of living falls after breakups," said Andrew J. Cherlin, a sociologist at the Johns Hopkins University and author of a book on divided families.
NEWS
June 13, 1996
AMONG THE many disastrous legacies of the welfare dependency of the past three decades is the transformation of ** public housing from an accommodation of last resort to a permanent shelter for the poor. This changed the whole character of public housing. As poverty was concentrated and working poor moved elsewhere, formerly tidy high-rises became run-down warrens of crime and dysfunction.During his four years in Washington, President Clinton has taken decisive steps to reform public housing.
NEWS
September 17, 1993
Dr. Joycelyn Elders, the nation's new surgeon general, took office last week having made it clear that she intends to tackle some tough and controversial issues. At the top of her list is the country's epidemic of adolescent pregnancy, a problem Dr. Elders has targeted as a leading cause of poverty and a contributor to many other social ills, from infant mortality to welfare dependency. So far, however, the federal government has found no coherent or effective approach to the issue.One of the first challenges facing the new surgeon general is to define a national agenda for facing up to a problem that is putting increasing burdens on state and local governments.
NEWS
May 19, 1996
FORGET ABOUT AFDC. There's a new acronym in town, FIP. Under a bill signed into law this week by Gov. Parris Glendening, Aid to Families with Dependent Children -- better known as "welfare" -- is being replaced by the Family Investment Program. The difference is stark. AFDC encourages dependency through welfare; FIP stresses self-sufficiency through work.Thus, Maryland joins 36 other states revamping their public assistance programs. So far, the nationwide movement away from traditional welfare seems to be working: Nearly 1.3 million Americans have left the rolls in just three years.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | May 10, 1992
The time may have come when the issue of race could benefit from a period of "benign neglect." The subject has been too much talked about. The forum has been too much taken over by hysterics, paranoids, and boodlers on all sides. We may need a period in which Negro progress continues and racial rhetoric fades.It has been 22 years since Daniel Patrick Moynihan's 1970 memo to President Richard Nixon mentioned the need for a cooling-off period in race relations, urging that deeds replace angry words.
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