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Welfare Dependency

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NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | September 10, 1992
Clinton ad: "Second Chance"A 30-second spot produced by Great American Media Inc. began airing last night, according to Clinton aides, who refused to say where or divulge other details.Script: (Bill Clinton speaking) "For so long, government has failed us. And one of its worst failures has been welfare. I have a plan to end welfare as we know it -- to break the cycle of welfare dependency. We'll provide education, job training and child care, but then those who are able must go to work, either in the private sector or in public service.
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NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2000
When an ambushed car careened into William Henderson's cart in Harlem Park recently, it was the first time in five years there were no free hot dogs for the community's welfare-dependent children during their hungry last days of each month. For half a decade, hundreds of desperate children have flocked to Edmondson Avenue and North Carey Street to get a free hot dog and soda from Henderson when their parents' food stamps are depleted, leaving refrigerators empty. But last month, the droves of children, some walking a dozen blocks, came to the West Baltimore corner looking for the traditional meal, but instead found the hot dog cart gone.
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NEWS
October 15, 1993
Maryland's commission on welfare reform has presented a preliminary report recommending a number of welcome changes in the current system. Some of them, such as suggestions for holding absent fathers accountable for supporting their children, are long overdue. But other changes rest on questionable assumptions.Most everyone, including recipients, loathes the current system. Yet there is a lack of reliable data about welfare recipients -- who they are, why they need public assistance, how they supplement grants insufficient for minimal needs and what kinds of programs succeed in prodding them toward self-sufficiency.
NEWS
By George F. Will | August 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Conservatives in this summer of their discontent are suffering political hypochondria. They have a real problem, of which their hypochondria is symptomatic. They are not thinking clearly.And their somewhat surly bewilderment reveals conservative variants of two sins of this era -- self-pity, expressed in a sense of victimhood, and the entitlement mentality.Some conservatives feel victimized by various villains (the media, conservatives in office, etc.) and entitled to an unresisted sweep for their ideas.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | May 26, 1996
IN RECENT weeks, this column has taken a look at the failure of social-welfare programs to make much difference in the problems troubling our society. Despite enormous expenditures, most every gauge of social well-being suggests that the problems associated with poverty and dependency are only getting worse.We can't blame a lack of good intentions -- Americans love to solve problems and make things better.We can't blame stinginess. There's always a case to be made for spending more, but already this country has poured billions of dollars into improving the lives of poor people and gotten precious little progress for it.We can't blame lack of effort.
NEWS
By D.J. TICE | February 20, 1994
St. Paul, Minnesota.--Much of the enthusiasm for sweeping change is rooted in the conviction that we couldn't possibly do worse than our current welfare system, or health-care system, or educational system, or whatever.I take it to be a core conservative duty to remind one and all that things could always be worse.Welfare reform, in particular, seems propelled by the belief that the current system is a counterproductive shambles. Welfare is a trap for many recipients, we're told, while for others it is the great ''enabler'' of economic dependency, making single motherhood and non-work plausible if self-destructive lifestyles.
NEWS
By Frances F. Piven & Mimi Abramovitz | September 3, 1993
THE Clinton administration is making a grand show of touring the country and holding public hearings about "welfare reform."Women should be on guard.Johnnie Tillmon, leader of the National Welfare Rights Organization in the 1960s, used to call the welfare system "The Man" because, she said, it ruled women's lives.Unfortunately, the term still fits. Men are the welfare "experts," and the system they have designed is increasingly abusive of poor women struggling to raise children.For 20 years, a long line of male policy wonks have been complaining that welfare "dependency" is America's major problem.
NEWS
By JULIE ROVNER and JULIE ROVNER,Julie Rovner, a reporter for Congressional Quarterly, covered the inception of the Family Support Act.CHICAGO TRIBUNE/1983 | April 5, 1992
For those of you who haven't noticed, welfare reform is back on the national agenda.Both President Bush and Democratic front-runner Bill Clinton have been talking about welfare. The Senate last month voted to require states to have "workfare" programs for able-bodied recipients of state general assistance programs. (The amendment, to the tax bill, was dropped even before President Bush vetoed the measure.) And states across the country -- Maryland included -- are proposing fundamental changes to their welfare programs in an effort to alter the behavior of poor people.
NEWS
By George F. Will | August 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Conservatives in this summer of their discontent are suffering political hypochondria. They have a real problem, of which their hypochondria is symptomatic. They are not thinking clearly.And their somewhat surly bewilderment reveals conservative variants of two sins of this era -- self-pity, expressed in a sense of victimhood, and the entitlement mentality.Some conservatives feel victimized by various villains (the media, conservatives in office, etc.) and entitled to an unresisted sweep for their ideas.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Even more than finding a job or paying th rent, low-income Americans worry most about paying doctors and hospital bills, according to a new survey of families who make less than $20,000 a year.The study also found that the nation's poor embrace attitudes toward welfare very similar to those of wealthier Americans.Health-related concerns accounted for five of the 10 top problems that low-income Americans said they had faced in the previous 12 months, the study found. While 10.6 percent said they had worried about making rent or mortgage payments, 18.3 percent said they were most concerned about paying medical bills.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | May 26, 1996
IN RECENT weeks, this column has taken a look at the failure of social-welfare programs to make much difference in the problems troubling our society. Despite enormous expenditures, most every gauge of social well-being suggests that the problems associated with poverty and dependency are only getting worse.We can't blame a lack of good intentions -- Americans love to solve problems and make things better.We can't blame stinginess. There's always a case to be made for spending more, but already this country has poured billions of dollars into improving the lives of poor people and gotten precious little progress for it.We can't blame lack of effort.
NEWS
By D.J. TICE | February 20, 1994
St. Paul, Minnesota.--Much of the enthusiasm for sweeping change is rooted in the conviction that we couldn't possibly do worse than our current welfare system, or health-care system, or educational system, or whatever.I take it to be a core conservative duty to remind one and all that things could always be worse.Welfare reform, in particular, seems propelled by the belief that the current system is a counterproductive shambles. Welfare is a trap for many recipients, we're told, while for others it is the great ''enabler'' of economic dependency, making single motherhood and non-work plausible if self-destructive lifestyles.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | October 24, 1993
The preliminary report from the Governor's Commission on Welfare Reform raises more questions than it answers. The most important question is also the simplest and most vexing -- Why?What do we want to accomplish?Part of the answer is obvious. The safety net for our poorest citizens is inefficient, inadequate, degrading and roundly despised as much by those who depend on it as by those who pay for it. But press beyond the general loathing and you'll discover the reason welfare is such a mess in the first place.
NEWS
October 15, 1993
Maryland's commission on welfare reform has presented a preliminary report recommending a number of welcome changes in the current system. Some of them, such as suggestions for holding absent fathers accountable for supporting their children, are long overdue. But other changes rest on questionable assumptions.Most everyone, including recipients, loathes the current system. Yet there is a lack of reliable data about welfare recipients -- who they are, why they need public assistance, how they supplement grants insufficient for minimal needs and what kinds of programs succeed in prodding them toward self-sufficiency.
NEWS
By Frances F. Piven & Mimi Abramovitz | September 3, 1993
THE Clinton administration is making a grand show of touring the country and holding public hearings about "welfare reform."Women should be on guard.Johnnie Tillmon, leader of the National Welfare Rights Organization in the 1960s, used to call the welfare system "The Man" because, she said, it ruled women's lives.Unfortunately, the term still fits. Men are the welfare "experts," and the system they have designed is increasingly abusive of poor women struggling to raise children.For 20 years, a long line of male policy wonks have been complaining that welfare "dependency" is America's major problem.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Even more than finding a job or paying th rent, low-income Americans worry most about paying doctors and hospital bills, according to a new survey of families who make less than $20,000 a year.The study also found that the nation's poor embrace attitudes toward welfare very similar to those of wealthier Americans.Health-related concerns accounted for five of the 10 top problems that low-income Americans said they had faced in the previous 12 months, the study found. While 10.6 percent said they had worried about making rent or mortgage payments, 18.3 percent said they were most concerned about paying medical bills.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH NEUFFER | August 9, 1992
Struggling with strained budgets and frustrated by surging numbers of dependent poor, growing numbers of states are asking Washington to waive federal regulations so they may implement sweeping changes in their welfare systems.Last month, New Jersey became the fifth state this year to receive such a waiver, which allows the state to undertake experimental reforms for the next five years, including denying further benefits to mothers who have more children while on welfare.The state-by-state movement, which has spread like a brush fire from California to Maryland to New Jersey, has a common theme.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | October 24, 1993
The preliminary report from the Governor's Commission on Welfare Reform raises more questions than it answers. The most important question is also the simplest and most vexing -- Why?What do we want to accomplish?Part of the answer is obvious. The safety net for our poorest citizens is inefficient, inadequate, degrading and roundly despised as much by those who depend on it as by those who pay for it. But press beyond the general loathing and you'll discover the reason welfare is such a mess in the first place.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | September 10, 1992
Clinton ad: "Second Chance"A 30-second spot produced by Great American Media Inc. began airing last night, according to Clinton aides, who refused to say where or divulge other details.Script: (Bill Clinton speaking) "For so long, government has failed us. And one of its worst failures has been welfare. I have a plan to end welfare as we know it -- to break the cycle of welfare dependency. We'll provide education, job training and child care, but then those who are able must go to work, either in the private sector or in public service.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH NEUFFER | August 9, 1992
Struggling with strained budgets and frustrated by surging numbers of dependent poor, growing numbers of states are asking Washington to waive federal regulations so they may implement sweeping changes in their welfare systems.Last month, New Jersey became the fifth state this year to receive such a waiver, which allows the state to undertake experimental reforms for the next five years, including denying further benefits to mothers who have more children while on welfare.The state-by-state movement, which has spread like a brush fire from California to Maryland to New Jersey, has a common theme.
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