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Welfare Debate

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NEWS
January 4, 1995
With welfare reform at the top of the new Republican-dominated Congress' agenda in 1995, the debate is heating up over what "reform" really means and how to get there. This month, House Republicans will propose setting a five-year limit on welfare benefits. Last week, the Clinton administration blasted the GOP plan, charging it would shove some 5.3 million children -- more than half the 9.7 million children who benefit from Aid to Families With Dependent Children, the nation's main welfare program -- off the rolls.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
The big question facing Baltimore's National Aquarium - whether to keep Atlantic bottlenose dolphins in the amphitheater pool or release them to an ocean-side sanctuary - is the latest twist in the decades-long evolution of American zoos and aquatic attractions from circus-like menageries to portals into the natural environment. Much of the change is driven by emerging scientific evidence that shows the advanced intellect of marine mammals compared with species such as sharks and puffins.
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NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 24, 1995
WASHINGTON -- For Daniel Patrick Moynihan, a star in the Washington galaxy for three decades, these are strange and troubling times.Widely regarded as the foremost congressional expert on welfare, Senator Moynihan has seemed disengaged, almost isolated, as newly dominant Republicans prepare to make major changes in the nation's support system for the poor.True, the New York Democrat has criticized the GOP plan. He has his own proposal and is scheduled to lead the Democratic opposition during the floor debate, which has been delayed by squabbling among Republicans.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | September 25, 2006
State officials are moving forward with implementation of an embattled computer system to track child welfare cases despite warnings from child advocates and social workers who say dramatic improvements are needed before it is expanded to Baltimore. Members of the Coalition to Protect Maryland's Children are urging Department of Human Resources Secretary Christopher J. McCabe to roll back Baltimore's planned Nov. 13 start date to give technicians more time to correct glitches. "It's becoming difficult to determine what the situation with [the new system]
NEWS
June 24, 1994
"Anyone who can go to work must go to work," President Clinton said last week when he introduced his welfare reform plan. There's a lot to be said for the work ethic, but it's important to remember that in the context of the welfare debate, "anyone" refers to mothers, often mothers of young children. If they go to work, someone must watch the children -- and therein lies one of the toughest obstacles on the road to welfare reform.The day care dilemma encompasses a web of issues familiar to millions of American families at all economic levels.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, reinserting himself into the welfare debate, said yesterday that Republican reform plans were still too tough on innocent children and too soft on nonworking recipients and nonpaying parents.While praising Republicans for incorporating many of his suggestions in plans to toughen child-support enforcement, the president criticized their reluctance to revoke the professional and drivers' licenses of those with overdue child support."We've got to send a loud signal: No parent in America has a right to walk away from the responsibility to raise their children," Mr. Clinton said in a speech before the National Association of Counties.
NEWS
By LAURA LIPPMAN | March 21, 1993
What's the difference between a carrot and a stick? Well, under Maryland's welfare reform, the carrot is not getting hit with the stick.Carolyn Colvin, secretary for the Department of Human Resources, takes exception to any suggestion that Maryland's reform plan is punitive. But the rewards in the program are thin, when compared to the punishments -- sanctions that can reduce a typical welfare check by up to 18 percent.Since the program started in January, more than 9,000 women have lost money for not taking their children to doctors or for not making sure they attend school.
NEWS
May 26, 1995
Question of FactsJohn O'Donnell's May 16 article repeats the GOP propaganda line by quoting Sen. Lauch Faircloth: "The root cause of the problems in welfare . . . is children born out of wedlock. If we don't address this, we're simply never going to reduce welfare dependency."Mr. O'Donnell then goes on to quote Sen. Phil Gramm: "We have got to stop giving people more and more money to have more and more children."Why did not Mr. O'Donnell bother to mention that this line of reasoning is based on scholarship which was recanted by its author, Charles Murray, a year ago?
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 19, 1995
BOSTON -- In the rush to overhaul welfare, we must have missed the eulogy hidden in all the rhetoric. After all, this policy-making isn't just about ending welfare as we know it. It marks the end of a long cultural debate about motherhood as we knew it.Democrats and Republicans, Senate and House, left and right, are wrangling over the details. But they have already arrived at TC consensus as radical as it is unacknowledged. It's a consensus that says: A mother's place is in the work force.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton vowed when he ran for president to "end welfare as we know it," but when he got a gander at congressional Republicans' version of welfare overhaul yesterday he promptly promised to veto it."I am determined to work with Congress to achieve real, bipartisan welfare reform," the president said. "But this welfare bill includes deep cuts that are tough on children and at odds with my central goal of moving people from welfare to work."Mr. Clinton's decision has the practical effect of combining the welfare issue with the stalled budget talks.
NEWS
By Holloway Sparks | August 4, 2003
WELFARE "REFORM" is on the congressional agenda again, with the Senate poised to vote on proposed legislation reauthorizing Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). First enacted in 1996, TANF in its second version has already passed the House. Although this round of welfare legislation has generated far less attention than the 1996 reform effort, there is at least one disturbing similarity: The voices of low-income Americans are once again missing from public deliberations about welfare.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton vowed when he ran for president to "end welfare as we know it," but when he got a gander at congressional Republicans' version of welfare overhaul yesterday he promptly promised to veto it."I am determined to work with Congress to achieve real, bipartisan welfare reform," the president said. "But this welfare bill includes deep cuts that are tough on children and at odds with my central goal of moving people from welfare to work."Mr. Clinton's decision has the practical effect of combining the welfare issue with the stalled budget talks.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 19, 1995
BOSTON -- In the rush to overhaul welfare, we must have missed the eulogy hidden in all the rhetoric. After all, this policy-making isn't just about ending welfare as we know it. It marks the end of a long cultural debate about motherhood as we knew it.Democrats and Republicans, Senate and House, left and right, are wrangling over the details. But they have already arrived at TC consensus as radical as it is unacknowledged. It's a consensus that says: A mother's place is in the work force.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The debate over welfare reform is growing louder but not necessarily more enlightening. On the contrary, there is a conspicuous lack of candor on both sides.At the most simplistic level, there is obvious political appeal in the Republican notion of turning the welfare program over to the states by providing them with block grants and the freedom to design their own strategies. It is an article of faith in American politics that there is virtue in having local officials make the decisions that affect their own constituents most directly.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 24, 1995
WASHINGTON -- For Daniel Patrick Moynihan, a star in the Washington galaxy for three decades, these are strange and troubling times.Widely regarded as the foremost congressional expert on welfare, Senator Moynihan has seemed disengaged, almost isolated, as newly dominant Republicans prepare to make major changes in the nation's support system for the poor.True, the New York Democrat has criticized the GOP plan. He has his own proposal and is scheduled to lead the Democratic opposition during the floor debate, which has been delayed by squabbling among Republicans.
NEWS
May 26, 1995
Question of FactsJohn O'Donnell's May 16 article repeats the GOP propaganda line by quoting Sen. Lauch Faircloth: "The root cause of the problems in welfare . . . is children born out of wedlock. If we don't address this, we're simply never going to reduce welfare dependency."Mr. O'Donnell then goes on to quote Sen. Phil Gramm: "We have got to stop giving people more and more money to have more and more children."Why did not Mr. O'Donnell bother to mention that this line of reasoning is based on scholarship which was recanted by its author, Charles Murray, a year ago?
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 17, 1992
Boston. -- The photograph in the Maine newspaper showed a young, attractive mother and her two small children.''I'm a natural at motherhood,'' the woman had happily told the reporter. ''It's my job.''Nothing about these words or this job description would have stuck in my mind over the months since I first read them except for one decidedly non-traditional fact of her life.The 20-year-old and her children were living on welfare.The ''employers'' for her AFDC ''job'' are taxpayers. The people who contributed to her paycheck included other ''natural'' mothers who went to work every day when they too might have preferred staying home with their toddlers.
NEWS
By WILLIAM J. BENNETT and PETER WEHNER | February 6, 1994
Republicans should propose in this session of Congress legislation that would end welfare for anyone having a child out of wedlock. Our preference is to end, one year after the legislation is passed, all forms of economic support for single mothers who have new children.These would include an end to aid to families with dependent children, an end to subsidized housing, an end to food stamps, an end to all forms of assistance for those single mothers currently on welfare, an end to visitation rights for illegitimate fathers and a change in the tax codes to make them more favorable to marriage and children.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, reinserting himself into the welfare debate, said yesterday that Republican reform plans were still too tough on innocent children and too soft on nonworking recipients and nonpaying parents.While praising Republicans for incorporating many of his suggestions in plans to toughen child-support enforcement, the president criticized their reluctance to revoke the professional and drivers' licenses of those with overdue child support."We've got to send a loud signal: No parent in America has a right to walk away from the responsibility to raise their children," Mr. Clinton said in a speech before the National Association of Counties.
NEWS
January 4, 1995
With welfare reform at the top of the new Republican-dominated Congress' agenda in 1995, the debate is heating up over what "reform" really means and how to get there. This month, House Republicans will propose setting a five-year limit on welfare benefits. Last week, the Clinton administration blasted the GOP plan, charging it would shove some 5.3 million children -- more than half the 9.7 million children who benefit from Aid to Families With Dependent Children, the nation's main welfare program -- off the rolls.
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