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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
A Baltimore man who is more than $17,000 behind in child support payments owes the money to the same state agency that has been his only means of support for the past 12 years.Since 1980, Calvin Thornton, a 39-year-old man whose only income is a welfare check, has failed to pay any child support to the Westminster woman who is his former wife and the mother of his 12-year-old child.But, court records show, the rights to the child were transferred from the mother to the Department of Social Services, which means that Thornton no longer owes the money to his former wife, but to the same agency that sends him a welfare check every month.
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NEWS
August 12, 2012
You know some things never change when the GOP presidential candidate starts criticizing his Democratic opponent for handing out checks to undeserving layabouts who are too lazy to work. Remember Ronald Reagan's "welfare queens" driving Cadillacs and eating sirloin steaks? Or Newt Gingrich's epithet for Barack Obama as the "food stamp president" during this year's GOP primaries? Apparently there's no stereotype too base, no innuendo too thinly disguised that some aspirant to high office claiming to represent the party of Lincoln won't use it to stir up the politics of racial and class resentment.
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NEWS
By Barbara Ransby | July 6, 1994
PRESIDENT Clinton may have been a Yale man and a Rhodes scholar, but his plan to "end welfare as we know it" shows he is a poor student of history and public policy.Nearly 30 years ago Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, then a member of President Johnson's administration, wrote a report entitled "The Negro Family: A Case for National Action." In it he described black female-headed households as pathological and symptomatic of urban decay. The report was criticized widely as being both racist and ill-informed.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
As Howard County's welfare caseload continues to dwindle, social service officials are stepping up efforts to keep people off welfare through a number of job training and mentor programs.Later this year, Howard's Department of Social Services will enact the second phase of its welfare reform initiative by offering on-the-job training classes designed to take former welfare recipients to a higher level and help them earn salary increases and promotions.Officials hope to build on the success of current initiatives such as the welfare avoidance grant program, a state effort to move people toward financial independence.
NEWS
November 20, 1995
ANNE ARUNDEL County is on the cutting edge of one of the most pressing national issues, welfare reform. The Department of Social Services, mainly a check-dispensing service not so long ago, now focuses on employment and empowerment. In the last two months, one-third of applicants for Aid to Families with Dependent Children found jobs. The key word here is flexibility. Local caseworkers have been tailoring assistance to an individual family's needs instead of handing out money based on rigid formulas.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | November 24, 1993
Washington. -- Alot of crazy ideas are now at large in America that, if codified and pursued, would create a social explosion beyond anything we've ever seen.Perhaps the most dangerous is the demagogic campaign by conservatives who throw out inflammatory statistics about illegitimate babies as a reason to abolish the entire American welfare system.Within this month you've seen a George Will column deploring the fact that the illegitimacy rate is now 68 per cent for blacks and a fast-rising 22 per cent for whites and that ''government now subsidizes such behavior.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
As Howard County's welfare caseload continues to dwindle, social service officials are stepping up efforts to keep people off welfare through a number of job training and mentor programs.Later this year, Howard's Department of Social Services will enact the second phase of its welfare reform initiative by offering on-the-job training classes designed to take former welfare recipients to a higher level and help them earn salary increases and promotions.Officials hope to build on the success of current initiatives such as the welfare avoidance grant program, a state effort to move people toward financial independence.
NEWS
August 12, 2012
You know some things never change when the GOP presidential candidate starts criticizing his Democratic opponent for handing out checks to undeserving layabouts who are too lazy to work. Remember Ronald Reagan's "welfare queens" driving Cadillacs and eating sirloin steaks? Or Newt Gingrich's epithet for Barack Obama as the "food stamp president" during this year's GOP primaries? Apparently there's no stereotype too base, no innuendo too thinly disguised that some aspirant to high office claiming to represent the party of Lincoln won't use it to stir up the politics of racial and class resentment.
NEWS
By CAROLYN W. COLVIN | February 20, 1994
Recently Connie Tolbert, a former welfare mother, recalled the day in 1990 when she first paid for groceries with her paycheck instead of food stamps. Ms. Tolbert had been off and on welfare for eight years. Unaccustomed to budgeting, she was suddenly stricken with fear that she wouldn't have enough money to feed her four kids and pay the rent.But those anxious moments in the supermarket checkout lasted only a few minutes. She presented her groceries and paid the bill. And she still had money in the bank.
NEWS
By James Lileks | December 9, 1993
EN ROUTE to the White House, Bill Clinton promised us he'd end welfare as we know it. This doesn't really say much. Dr. Jack Kevorkian could say the same thing; none of his clients ever show up clamoring for a government check.You have to ask for details -- specific goals, specific policies. As in, "Two years and you're out." (Or, in the case of Dr. Kevorkian, two whiffs and you're out.)Will Dr. Bill put the mask over the face of the welfare state, and ease it into dreamless oblivion? Let's consider the problem.
NEWS
November 20, 1995
ANNE ARUNDEL County is on the cutting edge of one of the most pressing national issues, welfare reform. The Department of Social Services, mainly a check-dispensing service not so long ago, now focuses on employment and empowerment. In the last two months, one-third of applicants for Aid to Families with Dependent Children found jobs. The key word here is flexibility. Local caseworkers have been tailoring assistance to an individual family's needs instead of handing out money based on rigid formulas.
NEWS
By Barbara Ransby | July 6, 1994
PRESIDENT Clinton may have been a Yale man and a Rhodes scholar, but his plan to "end welfare as we know it" shows he is a poor student of history and public policy.Nearly 30 years ago Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, then a member of President Johnson's administration, wrote a report entitled "The Negro Family: A Case for National Action." In it he described black female-headed households as pathological and symptomatic of urban decay. The report was criticized widely as being both racist and ill-informed.
NEWS
By CAROLYN W. COLVIN | February 20, 1994
Recently Connie Tolbert, a former welfare mother, recalled the day in 1990 when she first paid for groceries with her paycheck instead of food stamps. Ms. Tolbert had been off and on welfare for eight years. Unaccustomed to budgeting, she was suddenly stricken with fear that she wouldn't have enough money to feed her four kids and pay the rent.But those anxious moments in the supermarket checkout lasted only a few minutes. She presented her groceries and paid the bill. And she still had money in the bank.
NEWS
By James Lileks | December 9, 1993
EN ROUTE to the White House, Bill Clinton promised us he'd end welfare as we know it. This doesn't really say much. Dr. Jack Kevorkian could say the same thing; none of his clients ever show up clamoring for a government check.You have to ask for details -- specific goals, specific policies. As in, "Two years and you're out." (Or, in the case of Dr. Kevorkian, two whiffs and you're out.)Will Dr. Bill put the mask over the face of the welfare state, and ease it into dreamless oblivion? Let's consider the problem.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | November 24, 1993
Washington. -- Alot of crazy ideas are now at large in America that, if codified and pursued, would create a social explosion beyond anything we've ever seen.Perhaps the most dangerous is the demagogic campaign by conservatives who throw out inflammatory statistics about illegitimate babies as a reason to abolish the entire American welfare system.Within this month you've seen a George Will column deploring the fact that the illegitimacy rate is now 68 per cent for blacks and a fast-rising 22 per cent for whites and that ''government now subsidizes such behavior.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
Al Thumel worked out simple sums on a blackboard in his office, showing over and over again how subtracting $18 a month from the typical welfare check adds up to more homeless families in Baltimore this winter.One woman, even with assistance through the state's rental allowance program, will have $1 left over after she pays rent and utilities, Mr. Thumel calculated. Others will be $10, $20, $50 shy of their housing costs, putting them at imminent risk for eviction."The real problem is going to start next month, when people start seeing these reduced checks," said Mr. Thumel, chief of Relocation Services for the city Housing Authority, where upward of 40 people seek help daily.
NEWS
By Don Terry and Don Terry,New York Times News Service | October 7, 1991
DETROIT -- For Ruth Williams, a middle-aged grandmother who says she has asthma, high-blood pressure and phlebitis, the welfare check for $87.50 she received twice a month from the state of Michigan "was like a life raft.""I'm poor, very poor," she said. "The check wasn't much, but it gave me a chance to feel like a human being."On Tuesday, the checks stopped coming.Faced with a budget deficit and hoping to end "welfare dependency," the state Legislature eliminated the general assistance welfare program for more than 80,000 adults who are so poor that they can typically have no more than a car worth $1,500.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
Al Thumel worked out simple sums on a blackboard in his office, showing over and over again how subtracting $18 a month from the typical welfare check adds up to more homeless families in Baltimore this winter.One woman, even with assistance through the state's rental allowance program, will have $1 left over after she pays rent and utilities, Mr. Thumel calculated. Others will be $10, $20, $50 shy of their housing costs, putting them at imminent risk for eviction."The real problem is going to start next month, when people start seeing these reduced checks," said Mr. Thumel, chief of Relocation Services for the city Housing Authority, where upward of 40 people seek help daily.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
A Baltimore man who is more than $17,000 behind in child support payments owes the money to the same state agency that has been his only means of support for the past 12 years.Since 1980, Calvin Thornton, a 39-year-old man whose only income is a welfare check, has failed to pay any child support to the Westminster woman who is his former wife and the mother of his 12-year-old child.But, court records show, the rights to the child were transferred from the mother to the Department of Social Services, which means that Thornton no longer owes the money to his former wife, but to the same agency that sends him a welfare check every month.
NEWS
By Don Terry and Don Terry,New York Times News Service | October 7, 1991
DETROIT -- For Ruth Williams, a middle-aged grandmother who says she has asthma, high-blood pressure and phlebitis, the welfare check for $87.50 she received twice a month from the state of Michigan "was like a life raft.""I'm poor, very poor," she said. "The check wasn't much, but it gave me a chance to feel like a human being."On Tuesday, the checks stopped coming.Faced with a budget deficit and hoping to end "welfare dependency," the state Legislature eliminated the general assistance welfare program for more than 80,000 adults who are so poor that they can typically have no more than a car worth $1,500.
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