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By Mickey Kaus | July 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Change the welfare system, and the underclass will change, too. This has been the great hope of radical welfare reformers, left and right. It was also the hope of Bill Clinton in 1992, when he pledged not simply to ''end welfare as we know it,'' but to use welfare reform to ''break the culture of poverty and dependence'' in the nation's ghettos.Mr. Clinton's welfare proposal, belatedly unveiled in 1994, would have required work, even of single mothers, after two or three years on the dole.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Half the Senate, including many Democrats, called on the majority leader yesterday to schedule a debate on re-authorizing the welfare program created by an innovative 1996 law that expires in three weeks. In a letter Democratic Sen. Tom Daschle of South Dakota, the senators said the program should be extended for five years, with more money for child care. In May, the House passed a welfare bill along the lines favored by President Bush. It would impose stricter work requirements on recipients and provide a modest increase in money for child care.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 27, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A dramatic overhaul of the welfare system, shaped in the House by the Republican "Contract with America," is likely to undergo some retooling in the Senate -- but many of the fundamental changes that have sparked an acrimonious national debate may well be retained."
NEWS
By Clarence Page | November 27, 2001
WASHINGTON -- When President Bush announced a record-breaking $1 billion in grants to help the homeless Nov. 20, he did not address a mystery that his announcement raises: Why, at a time when Washington is celebrating shrinking poverty and welfare rolls, have the needs of the hungry and homeless as measured by private food banks continued to grow? Blaming the terror events of 9-11 is not enough. Food banks, homeless shelters and the charity networks that serve them have been reporting growing demand in recent years, even when jobs, the economy and welfare reform were showing spectacular success.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Responding to Democratic criticism, House Republicans unveiled a revised welfare bill yesterday that abandons a proposed lifetime prohibition on cash payments to teen-age mothers but toughens work requirements for recipients.As the House Ways and Means Committee prepared to vote section by section today on the proposal, Democrats welcomed some of the changes proposed by the panel's Republican majority, but they remained opposed to the overall thrust of the measure."I think we made some progress," said Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Baltimore Democrat.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 23, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Maryland would lose nearly $1 billion in federal money over the next five years under the sweeping welfare bill that Republicans hope to push through the House this week, according to a Clinton administration analysis of the legislation.The figures surfaced as tempers flared on the House floor yesterday, soon after lawmakers began to consider amendments to the 396-page bill.A second analysis that focused on the immediate impact of some of the cuts for states, offered by a key Democrat in the welfare debate, Rep. Harold E. Ford of Tennessee, showed that Maryland's allocation for Aid to Families With Dependent Children (AFDC)
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton vowed when he ran for president to "end welfare as we know it," but when he got a gander at congressional Republicans' version of welfare overhaul yesterday he promptly promised to veto it."I am determined to work with Congress to achieve real, bipartisan welfare reform," the president said. "But this welfare bill includes deep cuts that are tough on children and at odds with my central goal of moving people from welfare to work."Mr. Clinton's decision has the practical effect of combining the welfare issue with the stalled budget talks.
NEWS
July 16, 1996
WHEN BILL CLINTON was elected president in 1992, welfare reform looked as certain as an overhaul of the nation's health care system. Wrong on both counts. In recent months, thepresident's promise to "end welfare as we know it" appeared headed into the same abyss as his health care plans.Caught between Republicans who have pushed harsher versions of reform and Democrats (including the president) who resist the most punitive approaches, congressional action was stalled. Meanwhile, the action shifted away from Washington, as federal waivers encouraged state governments to undertake their own experimental reforms.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Two top Clinton administration officials responsible for welfare policy resigned yesterday, saying they could not support the bill President Clinton signed.The resignations come as states struggle to sort out how to implement a bill that means more state control over welfare programs, less federal money and greater expectations to put people to work.They also add to the appearance of a liberal exodus from the Department of Health and Human Services as the administration moderates social policy.
NEWS
July 30, 1996
WELFARE REFORM is the cat and immigration reform is the mouse. Provisions in welfare bills passed by the Senate and the House call for cuts in assistance for legal aliens that are so vast they overwhelm the more modest restrictions, especially on illegal aliens, that are included in a laboriously crafted immigration measure possibly nearing passage.Such are the vagaries of an election-year Congress now caught up in anti-terrorism legislation it thought it had been done with -- before Atlanta.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton delivers his State of the Union address tonight, he will do so to a joint session of Congress and to an audience of Americans who have given him the highest approval rating of his presidency.But the president and his aides suggested yesterday that Clinton has another important audience in mind: the nation's governors, particularly the Republicans who hold power in many of the populous and influential states."In the State of the Union address, I'm going to lay out the challenges that I see not only for the president and the Congress, but also for the states and local communities and private citizens," Clinton told the governors assembled at the White House yesterday under the auspices of the National Governors' Association.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | December 14, 1996
WHAT IS ''rational'' anyway? Well, several weeks ago around 8 a.m. anyone driving or walking along Baltimore Street, between Howard and Park, probably saw a naked man rather casually taking a stroll. He wasn't all nude. He wore a knit cap. That he didn't have anything else on, though, I believe constitutes irrational behavior. And not just because it was cold.Rational behavior would be to wear clothes while walking downtown. Similarly, rational behavior requires Congress to take the stripped version of welfare it passed as reform during its last session and add some essential elements that will keep it from becoming an embarrassment when its already obvious inadequacies become even more pronounced.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | September 30, 1996
HAILED AND dreaded as the most profound shift in federal social policy in six decades, the welfare bill of 1996 goes into effect tomorrow. Are we ready? Do we know what happens now?No. Uncertainties reign, and all states' situations differ. But a set of deep, tough issues will be getting attention.Number One: Are Americans, in their states and localities, up to forging a social contract determining what the privileged owe the poor? For decades issues of income redistribution, of equity in society, have been left to the federal government.
NEWS
September 20, 1996
WITH GOV. PARRIS N. Glendening's decision to use state dollars to fund nutrition and other welfare benefits for children of legal immigrants, Maryland has put itself in the forefront of states that are refusing to live with one of the most controversial provisions of the welfare reform bill passed by Congress and signed by President Clinton.For Maryland, doing the right thing was made easier by savings from lower caseloads that offset the projected $9 million annual cost. Even so, the decision affects only families with children, leaving many refugees and other adults adrift.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Two top Clinton administration officials responsible for welfare policy resigned yesterday, saying they could not support the bill President Clinton signed.The resignations come as states struggle to sort out how to implement a bill that means more state control over welfare programs, less federal money and greater expectations to put people to work.They also add to the appearance of a liberal exodus from the Department of Health and Human Services as the administration moderates social policy.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 1996
It's a new day for the National Urban League.The group will open its convention in New Orleans today with a newly aggressive stand on issues and a new openness toward linking arms with other civil rights groups.President Hugh Price's recent media campaign against the federal welfare bill, and his insistence that the government make jobs available for those cast off welfare, went against the league's traditional approach of offering job training.And the expected participation of National Association for the Advancement of Colored People chief Kweisi Mfume in the Urban League's convention symbolizes the groups' new commitment to working together.
NEWS
September 20, 1996
WITH GOV. PARRIS N. Glendening's decision to use state dollars to fund nutrition and other welfare benefits for children of legal immigrants, Maryland has put itself in the forefront of states that are refusing to live with one of the most controversial provisions of the welfare reform bill passed by Congress and signed by President Clinton.For Maryland, doing the right thing was made easier by savings from lower caseloads that offset the projected $9 million annual cost. Even so, the decision affects only families with children, leaving many refugees and other adults adrift.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
The House of Delegates voted yesterday to scrap two of the toughest provisions in Gov. Parris N. Glendening's welfare reform bill, deciding not to cut off recipients after five years or force them into community service programs after two years.The bill now moves to a conference committee, where differences between the Senate and House measures must be reconciled before the General Assembly ends its annual session at midnight tomorrow.But both houses already agree on a number of provisions, including:Providing cash assistance to a recipient only as a last resort.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1996
SOME MAY CALL HIM the last New Dealer, the last true Democrat.Others will look at Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes' vote against a welfare reform bill last week and say, "He's not running again."Not so, says his staff. He simply refuses to abandon his critical faculties in a vortex of ill political winds.His Democratic colleague from Maryland, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, joined 77 others in the Senate to support the bill -- 21 voted no. And all but one of Maryland's representatives in Congress -- newly elected Rep. Elijah E. Cummings of the 7th District -- were in the majority as the House measure passed 328-101.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 2, 1996
There is nothing wrong with Baltimore City schools that cannot be made worse by dividing authority over them.The welfare bill gives states broad powers to ship out, hide or bury their poor.Cheer up. The IRS will eliminate 5,000 jobs early next year. Nobody is going to audit your return.Bet on slots. Hizzoner says they are a sure thing no matter what the Gubner says.Pub Date: 8/02/96
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