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Welfare Benefits

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NEWS
March 12, 1992
Callers to SUNDIAL overwhelmingly back a state's right to limit welfare benefits to newcomers, as is done in a bill passed by the California Assembly. The bill limits welfare benefits in the first year to newcomers to the state to the same amount the person would have received from the state from which they moved. The state says it would remove the incentive to move to California for higher welfare benefits.Among 455 respondents, 420 (92 percent) said states should have the right to limit welfare benefits to newcomers, while 35 (8 percent)
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NEWS
August 19, 2013
There is no empirical support for the recent commentary claiming that welfare benefits are discouraging people from jobs ("In Maryland, it pays not to work," Aug. 14). The opinion piece is disingenuous and its recommendations are reckless. Tighten eligibility? Empirical data show that upward of 60 percent of all Maryland cash assistance applications are denied. Toughen work rules? Non-compliance with Maryland work rules stops cash grants. Reduce benefit levels? The maximum monthly cash grant for a Maryland family of three is $576, about 35 percent of the federal poverty level.
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NEWS
October 24, 2012
David L. Warnock, chairman of the Center for Urban Families, bemoans the fact that dads released from jail accrue thousands of dollars' worth of child-support debt and have no way ever to get square, having earned no income while incarcerated and having a bleak chance of being gainfully employed in the future ("Hurting dads, hurting kids," Oct. 21). Meanwhile, their children don't have the child support that has been awarded and live in poverty. He urges expansion and strengthening new programs that help these men reenter the workforce, and the lives of the children, in a way that allows them to work off their arrears and, eventually, to "have their arrears reduced to zero.
NEWS
By Michael Tanner | August 13, 2013
Contrary to stereotypes, there is no evidence that people on welfare are lazy. Indeed, surveys of welfare recipients consistently show their desire for a job. However, there is also evidence that many are reluctant to accept available employment opportunities. In fact, despite the work requirements included in the 1996 welfare reform, less than 13 percent of adult welfare recipients in Maryland are working in unsubsidized jobs, while roughly 45 percent are involved in the broader definition of work participation, which includes activities like job search and training.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
A Carroll Circuit judge sentenced a Westminster man to four years in prison last week for a welfare fraud scheme in which he and his girlfriend stole nearly $8,000.Michael David Schweiger, 30, of Westminster was convicted in October of conspiracy to commit theft and welfare fraud. The conviction was a result of Carroll's first major welfare fraud investigation.On Thursday, Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. gave Schweiger a seven-year sentence, with three years suspended. He also imposed five years of supervised probation to follow Schweiger's release.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | February 23, 1993
A radical plan designed to discourage welfare mothers from having more children won a weighty endorsement in Annapolis yesterday.House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., a Kent County Democrat, encouraged state delegates to approve a bill that would at first limit and then deny extra welfare benefits to women who keep having children. Only New Jersey has a similar plan in place.Although many legislators want to reform welfare, the idea of using welfare benefits to limit family size and reproductive choices is a highly emotional one.Supporters say the proposal will encourage welfare mothers to use birth control and enable them to get off the public dole sooner.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 8, 1995
MADISON, Wis. -- In its heyday of counterculture chic a generation ago, the streets of this Wisconsin capital pulsed with protesters demanding a fair share for America's poor people and its racial minorities.Now it is a magnet for a small but growing number of poor Chicagoans who are fleeing gang-torn neighborhoods and moving the 150 miles to Madison for better schools, safer streets -- and, some of the newcomers acknowledge -- more generous welfare benefits."It's not the only reason I came," said Austina Moore, 26, who moved here from Chicago last fall with her four young children, and later persuaded her mother, Hester Moore, who is also on welfare, to follow them.
NEWS
By Michael Tanner | August 13, 2013
Contrary to stereotypes, there is no evidence that people on welfare are lazy. Indeed, surveys of welfare recipients consistently show their desire for a job. However, there is also evidence that many are reluctant to accept available employment opportunities. In fact, despite the work requirements included in the 1996 welfare reform, less than 13 percent of adult welfare recipients in Maryland are working in unsubsidized jobs, while roughly 45 percent are involved in the broader definition of work participation, which includes activities like job search and training.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 4, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The highly charged question of what strings the government can attach to the use of federal money reached the Supreme Court again yesterday, this time in the context of legal services for the poor. The court agreed to decide whether Congress violated the First Amendment when it restricted the kinds of arguments that lawyers supported by the Legal Services Corp. can make on behalf of clients seeking welfare benefits. Under the restriction, the lawyers can help clients who are seeking to receive or restore specific welfare benefits but may not become involved in "an effort to amend or otherwise challenge existing law."
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It is illegal for a company to contract out employees' jobs, and then fire the workers, in order to eliminate their health and welfare benefits, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously yesterday.Clearing up a dispute among lower courts, the justices said that health and welfare benefits receive as much protection under federal law from being terminated as do pension rights.The decision overturned a federal appeals court ruling that said that because vested pension rights are guaranteed but other benefits are not, the employer need not maintain those other benefits when it hires someone else to do the workers' jobs.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 7, 2013
Attempting to narrow America's immigration debate down to an easily understood set of issues is no easy task. But that's why The Sun pays me the big bucks. So, with no further caveats, I offer comprehensive immigration reform in 800 words, more or less. •The politics: Not too complicated here: It has become a post-Romney article of faith in GOP circles that the lopsided margin for the president among Hispanic (71 percent-27 percent) and Asian voters (73 percent-26 percent) was the result of perceived GOP indifference (and/or opposition)
NEWS
October 24, 2012
David L. Warnock, chairman of the Center for Urban Families, bemoans the fact that dads released from jail accrue thousands of dollars' worth of child-support debt and have no way ever to get square, having earned no income while incarcerated and having a bleak chance of being gainfully employed in the future ("Hurting dads, hurting kids," Oct. 21). Meanwhile, their children don't have the child support that has been awarded and live in poverty. He urges expansion and strengthening new programs that help these men reenter the workforce, and the lives of the children, in a way that allows them to work off their arrears and, eventually, to "have their arrears reduced to zero.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Tira Jones can recognize desperation in a caller's tone. When she was an unemployed single mother in need of a financial boost, her voice used to sound the same way. Now, in her full-time job processing online applications for food stamps for the state of Maryland, she is willing to share her story with other families looking for assistance — and put them at ease. "I've learned to have patience in dealing with things because I have a lot of empathy for people," Jones said. "A lot of customers are scared to apply because they've never done it before, or [they think]
TOPIC
By Andrew J. Cherlin and Andrew J. Cherlin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2003
Americans celebrate hard work. We love rags-to-riches stories. We tell welfare recipients that they must get off the rolls in five years because work builds character. But we have a blind spot: the millions of women and men who work for low wages, many in the growing service sector. The harried middle class relies on them to care for their children, cook their restaurant meals and attend to their elderly parents. Corporations hire them to park cars, sort mail, move office furniture and mop floors.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - More than 800,000 jobless Americans - about 7,900 of them in Maryland - stand to lose their unemployment benefits three days after Christmas because of a dispute that scuttled efforts yesterday to extend the aid before Congress adjourned for the year. As the Senate completed its work, prospects all but vanished for an agreement that could have saved the unemployment benefits from expiring. In addition to those whose benefits will run out Dec. 28, about 95,000 more jobless people are projected to lose their eligibility for aid each subsequent week.
NEWS
June 1, 2002
Question of the Month Have recent sexual abuse scandals heightened your concerns about the safety of children or caused changes in your children's lives? What steps should we take to protect kids against abuse? We are looking for 300 words or less; the deadline is June 24. Letters become the property of The Sun, which reserves the right to edit them. By submitting a letter, the author grants The Sun an irrevocable, non-exclusive right and license to use and republish the letter, in whole or in part, in all media and to authorize others to reprint it. Letters should include your name and address, along with a day and evening telephone number.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2000
The Maryland Department of Human Resources will offer more than 10,000 Baltimore families the opportunity to challenge the reduction or termination of their welfare benefits this month after a lawsuit contended they were not adequately informed of their appeal rights. The class action suit was filed in March against the state agency and the city Department of Social Services, claiming the agencies had effectively denied the appeal rights of thousands of families taken off welfare rolls.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 5, 2000
WASHINGTON - Examining the rights of the poor, the Supreme Court appeared deeply divided yesterday over the constitutionality of mandatory drug tests for pregnant women at public charity hospitals and over congressional curbs on families who sue to obtain welfare benefits. Holding hearings on two significant disputes, the justices seemed unsure of how to sort out conflicts between social policy goals and poor individuals' privacy and access to the courts. In the pregnant women's case, the court is reviewing the government's power to use criminal law to monitor the conduct of women during pregnancy.
NEWS
By Karen Czapanskiy | August 28, 2000
DEAR Mr. Gore: Congratulations on your acceptance speech. It was an impressive performance. I, for one, approve of a speech that contains details. As an advocate for welfare recipients in Baltimore, however, I have to tell you that many of your details about welfare reform were wrong. Welfare reform has had the salutary effect of focusing many welfare officials on helping recipients find work. Eager recipients have responded and many have found jobs. But even where recipients and welfare officials do their best, it is not enough.
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