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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
Despite opponents' concerns about cost and privacy, state lawmakers introduced a bill yesterday to require drug testing of welfare applicants who are suspected substance abusers and to reduce benefits of those who refuse "health screenings" and drug treatment.At the same time, members of the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Welfare Reform -- a bipartisan group -- proposed adding $10 million to the state budget to treat drug addicts who want public assistance.In December, the committee proposed mandatory drug testing for all welfare applicants and recommended withholding benefits from people who refused the test and drug treatment, but later expressed concern that such an action could hurt children and would pose constitutional problems.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 1999
DETROIT -- In an unusual effort to move more welfare recipients into the work force, Michigan plans a pilot program that would require thousands applying for aid to take drug tests to qualify for benefits.Starting in October, Michigan welfare applicants under 65 in three locations yet to be chosen will be required to take drug tests or forfeit their benefits. People already receiving benefits at those locations would be randomly tested.Those who test positive for illegal drugs would be required to get treatment to collect welfare money, and those who refuse treatment would be dropped from the welfare rolls.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 1999
DETROIT -- In an unusual effort to move more welfare recipients into the work force, Michigan plans a pilot program that would require thousands applying for aid to take drug tests to qualify for benefits.Starting in October, Michigan welfare applicants under 65 in three locations yet to be chosen will be required to take drug tests or forfeit their benefits. People already receiving benefits at those locations would be randomly tested.Those who test positive for illegal drugs would be required to get treatment to collect welfare money, and those who refuse treatment would be dropped from the welfare rolls.
NEWS
June 4, 1997
CHANGES IN FEDERAL welfare law have made it imperative that local governments change the way their social services departments operate.Most local welfare offices have served as check-dispensing agencies. But with new lifetime limits on cash benefits, local officials who do nothing but hand out money do the poor no favor. Helping them means helping them prepare for the day when they will have to be self-sufficient.In the Baltimore area, Anne Arundel County has been ahead of the pack on reform.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1996
A 2-month-old policy requiring welfare applicants to look for work or lose some benefits has at best met with mixed results, according to county social services officials.So far, three people have found work through the Up Front Job Search, but four have been penalized with reduced welfare payments for not making enough job applications.Since March 1, people seeking cash grants through Aid to Families With Dependent Children (AFDC) have been required to apply for five jobs a week while waiting for their aid applications to be processed, which may take up to a month.
NEWS
By From staff reports | March 15, 1997
Senate-approved bill would allow tax on tape, game rentalsThe state Senate approved a bill yesterday that would allow Baltimore and other Maryland cities to impose a 5 percent amusement tax on videotape and game cartridge rentals. The vote was 27-19.The bill is enabling legislation, which means that city governments would have to pass their own law before the tax could be levied. Baltimore and at least two other cities are interested in using the tax.The state legislation still must pass the House of Delegates and be signed by the governor to become law.House committee kills gangsta rap proposalThe House Appropriations Committee killed a bill yesterday that would have forced the state to divest pension funds from companies that produce music that advocates or glamorizes acts of sexual assault and other violence.
NEWS
June 4, 1997
CHANGES IN FEDERAL welfare law have made it imperative that local governments change the way their social services departments operate.Most local welfare offices have served as check-dispensing agencies. But with new lifetime limits on cash benefits, local officials who do nothing but hand out money do the poor no favor. Helping them means helping them prepare for the day when they will have to be self-sufficient.In the Baltimore area, Anne Arundel County has been ahead of the pack on reform.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has selected Anne Arundel County as one of eight welfare reform demonstration sites across the country. The designation puts the national spotlight on the county's 6-weel money to help welfare applicants with small emergencies or problems that may prevent them from finding or keeping jobs, said Vesta Kimble, deputy director of the county Department of Social Services.Applicants usually want to work, Ms. Kimble said. But they sometimes have a small crisis -- such as unexpected car repairs or day care emergencies -- that keep them from it. Caseworkers will use the money to help people through those crises, she said.
NEWS
May 7, 1996
WHEN ONLY THREE of 25 job seekers actually find work in two months, you might say it's a discouraging employment market. But the encouraging aspect is that these people were welfare applicants, pushed to find work under Carroll County's new Up Front Job Search program.Applicants have been told since March 1: Make five contacts each week to find a job, or lose full welfare benefits. That's been enough to motivate most eligible applicants -- 80 percent were exempt because they have children under 3 years old -- to at least make the required effort.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
In years past, most Maryland legislators would have scoffed at the notion that welfare applicants should submit to drug testing.They're not scoffing anymore.Instead, the proposal, already endorsed by a bipartisan panel, is stirring interest in Annapolis. Lawmakers from both parties say they like the concept -- if it can be made workable and affordable."I know a lot of people in my district are not going to like this idea of testing," said Del. Talmadge Branch, an East Baltimore Democrat. "But I have to keep the children in mind first.
NEWS
By From staff reports | March 15, 1997
Senate-approved bill would allow tax on tape, game rentalsThe state Senate approved a bill yesterday that would allow Baltimore and other Maryland cities to impose a 5 percent amusement tax on videotape and game cartridge rentals. The vote was 27-19.The bill is enabling legislation, which means that city governments would have to pass their own law before the tax could be levied. Baltimore and at least two other cities are interested in using the tax.The state legislation still must pass the House of Delegates and be signed by the governor to become law.House committee kills gangsta rap proposalThe House Appropriations Committee killed a bill yesterday that would have forced the state to divest pension funds from companies that produce music that advocates or glamorizes acts of sexual assault and other violence.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
Despite opponents' concerns about cost and privacy, state lawmakers introduced a bill yesterday to require drug testing of welfare applicants who are suspected substance abusers and to reduce benefits of those who refuse "health screenings" and drug treatment.At the same time, members of the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Welfare Reform -- a bipartisan group -- proposed adding $10 million to the state budget to treat drug addicts who want public assistance.In December, the committee proposed mandatory drug testing for all welfare applicants and recommended withholding benefits from people who refused the test and drug treatment, but later expressed concern that such an action could hurt children and would pose constitutional problems.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
In years past, most Maryland legislators would have scoffed at the notion that welfare applicants should submit to drug testing.They're not scoffing anymore.Instead, the proposal, already endorsed by a bipartisan panel, is stirring interest in Annapolis. Lawmakers from both parties say they like the concept -- if it can be made workable and affordable."I know a lot of people in my district are not going to like this idea of testing," said Del. Talmadge Branch, an East Baltimore Democrat. "But I have to keep the children in mind first.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Jonathan Bor and Kathy Lally and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
A legislative proposal to test welfare applicants for drugs has quickly encountered serious obstacles: Not only are treatment programs filled up, with long waiting lists, but the plan depends on the participation of religious leaders who are infuriated by it.As if that weren't trouble enough, the idea took state and city health and welfare officials by surprise. They first heard about it Tuesday, when the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Welfare Reform said it would recommend something no other state has done: testing all welfare applicants for drug use and denying them benefits if they refuse treatment or return to drugs.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | August 25, 1996
HARRIET -- SHE doesn't give her last name -- showed up at the Anne Arundel Department of Social Services on Annapolis' West Street last week, not to apply for benefits, but to look for work.Once she was a caretaker for disabled children. Then she became seriously ill with thyroid tumors. She lost her job, went on welfare, got off three months ago and does not wish to go back.She does not seem to realize exactly where she is. ''It says 'Job Center' out front,'' she says, scanning the classifieds.
NEWS
May 7, 1996
WHEN ONLY THREE of 25 job seekers actually find work in two months, you might say it's a discouraging employment market. But the encouraging aspect is that these people were welfare applicants, pushed to find work under Carroll County's new Up Front Job Search program.Applicants have been told since March 1: Make five contacts each week to find a job, or lose full welfare benefits. That's been enough to motivate most eligible applicants -- 80 percent were exempt because they have children under 3 years old -- to at least make the required effort.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | August 25, 1996
HARRIET -- SHE doesn't give her last name -- showed up at the Anne Arundel Department of Social Services on Annapolis' West Street last week, not to apply for benefits, but to look for work.Once she was a caretaker for disabled children. Then she became seriously ill with thyroid tumors. She lost her job, went on welfare, got off three months ago and does not wish to go back.She does not seem to realize exactly where she is. ''It says 'Job Center' out front,'' she says, scanning the classifieds.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Jonathan Bor and Kathy Lally and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
A legislative proposal to test welfare applicants for drugs has quickly encountered serious obstacles: Not only are treatment programs filled up, with long waiting lists, but the plan depends on the participation of religious leaders who are infuriated by it.As if that weren't trouble enough, the idea took state and city health and welfare officials by surprise. They first heard about it Tuesday, when the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Welfare Reform said it would recommend something no other state has done: testing all welfare applicants for drug use and denying them benefits if they refuse treatment or return to drugs.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1996
A 2-month-old policy requiring welfare applicants to look for work or lose some benefits has at best met with mixed results, according to county social services officials.So far, three people have found work through the Up Front Job Search, but four have been penalized with reduced welfare payments for not making enough job applications.Since March 1, people seeking cash grants through Aid to Families With Dependent Children (AFDC) have been required to apply for five jobs a week while waiting for their aid applications to be processed, which may take up to a month.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has selected Anne Arundel County as one of eight welfare reform demonstration sites across the country. The designation puts the national spotlight on the county's 6-weel money to help welfare applicants with small emergencies or problems that may prevent them from finding or keeping jobs, said Vesta Kimble, deputy director of the county Department of Social Services.Applicants usually want to work, Ms. Kimble said. But they sometimes have a small crisis -- such as unexpected car repairs or day care emergencies -- that keep them from it. Caseworkers will use the money to help people through those crises, she said.
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