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NEWS
September 6, 2012
By invoking executive privilege, President Obama has changed the welfare to work program that had been a rousing success and enabled many people to improve the quality of their lives. What Mr. Obama has done is unconstitutional and should be immediately overturned. This is just the latest example - the "Fast and Furious" cover-up, fighting states that want to have an "honest" election, etc. - of this administration's disregard and contempt for America. The economy is in the tank and well over 23 million Americans are either unemployed or underemployed.
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NEWS
August 2, 2014
Maryland families who are involved in low risk child maltreatment cases - such as leaving a child unattended - now have an option called Alternative Response that allows them to receive a social service response that is appropriately measured to suit their circumstances. In the past, families with children who experienced a rough patch had only option - to be investigated by the local Department of Social Services - no matter whether the incident was minor or severe. As a result, the relationship between families needing help and the caseworkers whose job it was to provide it was often adversarial.
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NEWS
February 17, 2014
If someone is on welfare, there is an excellent chance they were doing something wrong in their life that caused them to be in that position. In some cases, it's having a child out of wedlock and trying to support themselves and rear the child without support from the father. Other situations may include a poor attitude leading to an inadequate education, improper job interview skills, alcohol and drug addiction and an assortment of other problems. What I'm proposing is a solution to alleviate much of this problem to the individual and to the government.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
It didn't take Democrats much time to denounce Rep. Paul Ryan's latest plan for addressing poverty in this country. The main feature of the Republican's proposed "Opportunity Grant" would be to roll a lot of social welfare programs together and leave it mostly to states to decide how the money is spent, which sounds a great deal like the block grant proposals of the past. Critics included Maryland's own Rep. Chris Van Hollen, ranking member on the House Budget Committee, who said the former vice presidential nominee has used the mantra of "reform" as a cover to cut safety-net programs.
NEWS
December 4, 2009
The director of the Howard County Animal Welfare Society has been charged with stealing more than $50,000 of the private nonprofit group's funds. Robin Deltuva, 36, who lives at the longtime shelter compound next to the county government's separate animal facility in Ellicott City, is free on $20,000 bail. She's facing arraignment later this month, said Assistant State's Attorney Colleen McGuinn. Deltuva, whose mother, Michelle Deltuva, ran the private society for years, is charged with one count of a felony theft scheme.
NEWS
April 13, 2011
On April 13, in Readers Respond, John R. Baronas praised pro-life politicians and wrote "so too will 'safe' and legal abortions someday will be a thing of the past. " If he has his way, unsafe and illegal abortions will return from the past. What would victims of incest or rape, women too ill to bear children, or other women do then? This stance reveals how little value some place on the welfare, even the lives, of women. John T. Carey, Catonsville
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
Tira Jones can recognize desperation in a caller's tone. When she was an unemployed single mother in need of a financial boost, her voice used to sound the same way. Now, in her full-time job processing online applications for food stamps for the state of Maryland, she is willing to share her story with other families looking for assistance — and put them at ease. "I've learned to have patience in dealing with things because I have a lot of empathy for people," Jones said.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 13, 2014
This week marks the 50th anniversary of Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty," and as the joke goes, "Poverty won. " Five decades after a blizzard of programs began descending on the American people, the poverty rate remains essentially unchanged. That's a little unfair. What counts as poverty today would not have seemed so impoverished 50 years ago, when many of the poor lived without electricity and were no strangers to hunger. Today, the biggest health problems of the poor are more likely to stem from obesity than anything approaching starvation.
NEWS
By LUCINDA MOORE | November 24, 1992
Hampton, Virginia -- About a year ago I started working in an obstetric-gynecological clinic that treats many poor single women on welfare. Before that, I hadn't had the chance to observe up close the families we hear and talk so much about. I also had not realized there were so many white unwed mothers on welfare, the general media depiction being they're exclusively black and Hispanic. But in this southern city, in a section of town where poor whites outnumber blacks, the clinic's patients are about 70 percent white and 30 percent black.
NEWS
May 16, 1991
The welfare system was designed more than 50 years ago for a different America. To conclude that it isn't working may be the easy part. How to make it run smoother is another matter.The most imaginative idea comes from a pilot program in Baltimore city which will be expanded statewide by next fall, making Maryland the first state to fundamentally rebuild a benefits delivery system that has been discredited by waste, fraud and abuse.Under the new system welfare benefits, child support, food stamps and any other assistance will be rolled into one electronic bank account that the government will replenish every month.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
The Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation is out with its 25th Kids Count data book, measuring the wellbeing of children nationwide across a variety of health, economic, educational and community measures. In some ways, kids are much better off than they were in 1990, when the first book was published, and in some ways they are faring worse. For the good, we can credit a number of wise public policy efforts over the last generation, and for the ill, we can blame macroeconomic and social changes for which we have been unable - or unwilling - to mount a policy response.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
The big question facing Baltimore's National Aquarium - whether to keep Atlantic bottlenose dolphins in the amphitheater pool or release them to an ocean-side sanctuary - is the latest twist in the decades-long evolution of American zoos and aquatic attractions from circus-like menageries to portals into the natural environment. Much of the change is driven by emerging scientific evidence that shows the advanced intellect of marine mammals compared with species such as sharks and puffins.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
If someone is on welfare, there is an excellent chance they were doing something wrong in their life that caused them to be in that position. In some cases, it's having a child out of wedlock and trying to support themselves and rear the child without support from the father. Other situations may include a poor attitude leading to an inadequate education, improper job interview skills, alcohol and drug addiction and an assortment of other problems. What I'm proposing is a solution to alleviate much of this problem to the individual and to the government.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
The problem with giving poor people the choice to "cash out" of the welfare system is the number of opportunities it affords for even more abuses ( "Escaping the rat maze of the welfare state," Jan. 13). If recipients choose to take the cash, then lose it, they'll go right back on welfare, frustrating the purpose of giving them money in the first place. People could just take the money, spend it on whatever they like, and end up back on welfare. If we decide to not allow them back on welfare, then some people could die as a result of their poor financial planning.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 13, 2014
This week marks the 50th anniversary of Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty," and as the joke goes, "Poverty won. " Five decades after a blizzard of programs began descending on the American people, the poverty rate remains essentially unchanged. That's a little unfair. What counts as poverty today would not have seemed so impoverished 50 years ago, when many of the poor lived without electricity and were no strangers to hunger. Today, the biggest health problems of the poor are more likely to stem from obesity than anything approaching starvation.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Olivia Griffin gets to her job at Johns Hopkins Hospital an hour early each work day just to make sure she isn't late. It's not an easy feat for the 25-year-old mother of two who relies on the bus and subway for transportation from her West Baltimore home to the East Baltimore campus. But she doesn't mind because she loves her work and hopes to spend her career in health care at Hopkins. "I had training as a medical assistant but I couldn't find a job opportunity," said Griffin, who began work in patient transportation in October but plans on becoming a registered nurse.
NEWS
February 21, 1991
Could the state have avoided the current $40 million cost overrun in its Aid to Families with Dependant Children program? A study from the University of Baltimore's Center for Business and Economic Studies might serve as a guidepost for realistic AFDC estimates in the future.The report was commissioned by the Department of Human Resources to shed light on last year's puzzling surge in welfare applicants. What it found was a strong correlation between economic indicators and rising welfare rolls.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
I would like to add some points to former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich's column "How the welfare state has grown" (April 7). Mr. Ehrlich fails to mention the fact that every president since Lyndon Johnson, beginning in 1964, has raided the Social Security Trust Fund and transferred the money to the government's general fund to pay for the country's wars and for the campaign promises they made to their constituents in order to get re-elected. He also failed to mention that President Ronald Reagan called upon Congress in the early 1980s to increase Social Security contributions because he claimed the system was going broke.
NEWS
December 12, 2013
Democratic gubernatorial candidates Helen Mizeur, Anthony Brown and Doug Gansler are now campaigning in our neighborhoods. I thank them for their service to Maryland and the country even though they do not see things the way I do. However, I do understand the value system of the Democratic Party. I used to be a Democrat. I would ask the candidates to please keep connected with the hundreds of thousands of Marylanders who disagree with their basic political and social values and policies.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
Some of the biggest political contributors in recent elections don't appear on any list of the usual suspects; they are neither corporations, unions nor extremely wealthy individuals. Instead, they are new nonprofit organizations that have been granted tax-exempt status by the Internal Revenue Service because of the ostensible "social welfare" activities they engage in. In truth, however, these groups have morphed into some of the nation's most powerful backstage political actors, shelling out millions of dollars to support candidates for office without ever having to disclose where their money is coming from or who is trying to influence the outcome on an election.
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