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NEWS
September 12, 1997
SEN. RICHARD G. LUGAR of Indiana was right to muster bipartisan support on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to force its chairman, Sen. Jesse Helms of North Carolina, to hold hearings on the fitness of William F. Weld to be Ambassador to Mexico. Only that way can the committee and then the full Senate decide that issue.President Clinton's probable motive for nominating the popular moderate Republican governor of Massachusetts has disappeared. It was to get him out of young Rep. Joseph Kennedy II's way. Mr. Kennedy is no longer running for governor next year, but Mr. Weld is no longer governor anyway, having resigned to focus on this confirmation.
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SPORTS
Compiled from Inside Lacrosse reports | November 26, 2013
Sophomore long-stick midfielder-defenseman Jack Welding of Southlake Carroll High in Southlake, Texas, has committed orally to Maryland. The 6-foot, 175-pound left-hander started all 13 games as a freshman, scooping up 47 ground balls and tallying three assists. This summer, he was an All-Star at T99, UNC Team Camp and Top 205, playing with Iron Horse and Stickstar; he will be attend Maverik Showtime in 2014. He also considered Denver, Marquette and High Point. Junior oral commitments Boys' Latin defenseman Matt Sacks has committed to Furman.
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FEATURES
By Maggie Gallagher and Maggie Gallagher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 1998
"Mackerel by Moonlight," by William Weld. Simon and Schuster. 238 pages. $23.Mackerel by Moonlight" is a hardboiled detective fiction, minus the detective. Instead, former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld offers us for the hero a former prosecutor turned politician Terry Mullaly - who likes to hunt big game: sometimes it's deer; Sometimes its crooks. And sometimes it's a dame.In today's climate, it's perhaps best to go straight to point: Judging by the way he writes about women (which admittedly may be an unfair measure)
NEWS
July 26, 2007
James Bronson Elmore, a retired welding supervisor and former Kingsville resident, died of heart failure July 18 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford, Del. He was 88. Mr. Elmore was born and raised in Ritchpatch, Va., and moved to Baltimore in the early 1940s. He served in the Navy as a seaman from 1944 to 1946. Mr. Elmore was a welder and later supervisor at Airco Welding in Baltimore from 1942 until retiring in 1983. He had been a member of the Industrial Management Club, the Parkville Post of the American Legion and Hiss United Methodist Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Nicol and By Charles Nicol,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2001
Stillwater, by William F. Weld. Simon and Schuster. 235 pages. $23. First we note that William Weld served as governor of Massachusetts before turning to writing fiction. This makes him an interesting curiosity, and anyway, he asked for it when his first novel, Mackerel by Moonlight, was about -- what else? --a clever political operative, Terry Mullally, who got himself elected senator from Massachusetts while covering up a few major blemishes on his past and falling in love as well. In a less popular sequel, he struggled with his first few months in Washington.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | July 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- On the face of it, the choice of Gov. William Weld of Massachusetts to be ambassador to Mexico is proving something of an embarrassment for President Clinton.But in the convoluted world of American politics today, it may not be that simple.Sen. Jesse Helms of North Carolina, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has announced he won't even allow hearings on the nomination. He considers fellow Republican Weld to be soft on drugs, which Senator Helms sees as a disqualifying flaw for anyone representing the United States in Mexico.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | December 15, 1997
BOSTON -- Former Gov. Bill Weld, asked the other day how old he was, thought for a second and pronounced that he was 52. Then he added, wryly: ''My wife says I'm playing with a full deck for the first time.''There are many in the political world who would agree that when Mr. Weld abruptly quit as governor of Massachusetts and then fought a predictably losing fight with Sen. Jesse Helms to become U.S. Ambassador to Mexico last summer, he wasn't playing with a full deck.False movesIndeed, his actions were widely construed to be quixotic and his motivations just as widely questioned and guessed at. The ambassadorial job itself, in a Democratic administration no less, did not seem to be a very promising path to a Republican presidential nomination in 2000, as it was generally assumed Mr. Weld was after.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | May 23, 1991
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A problem that could have destroyed a space shuttle in flight went undetected and then unreported for eight months while NASA launched five missions and almost launched a sixth.The problem -- cracks in one of nine fuel-line temperature sensors in Columbia -- could extend to these parts in all shuttles.The suspect sensor first spent four months with the wrong contractor before finding its way to the correct manufacturer in January. In the meantime, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched Columbia, which had a replacement part, Discovery and Atlantis.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 30, 1996
NEW BEDFORD, Mass. -- When Republican Gov. William F. Weld arrived here the other day to open a Senate campaign office, Joe Dunleavy -- "72 years of age and always a Democrat" -- slipped into the back of the room."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 8, 1995
BOSTON -- When another presidential campaign is starting up and a politician announces he's not going to run in it because he wants to spend more time with his family, as Republican Gov. Bill Weld did the other day, the wise guys in politics just grin. They immediately translate that reason into his fear of losing or not being able to raise enough money or being chased out of the race by some issue.In Weld's case, his decision not to seek the presidency in 1996 came shortly after the declaration by Ralph Reed, executive director of the anti-abortion Christian Coalition, that he would urge his followers to oppose any presidential or vice presidential nominee who defended abortion rights, as Weld does.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2006
Albert Collison Earlbeck, a nationally known welding expert and founder of Earlbeck Gases and Technologies Inc., died from complications of an infection Monday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 87 and lived in Timonium. Mr. Earlbeck, the son of a clothing cutter, was born and raised at his family's South Fleet Street home. He was a 1936 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he played varsity tennis and was vice president of the National Honor Society. While a student at Poly, Mr. Earlbeck learned welding at T. A. Canty Inc. and continued working there while attending the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN | March 19, 2006
A two-alarm fire burned for nearly three hours yesterday at a Baltimore County junkyard before firefighters from two counties controlled it, officials said. Dispatchers received a call at 2:06 p.m. of a fire, which investigators believe started at a mulch company in the 11200 block of Philadelphia Road in White Marsh. Sparks from a welding job there ignited the blaze, which quickly spread to the adjacent Vince's Auto Parts, according to Elise Armacost, a spokeswoman for the Baltimore County Fire Department.
NEWS
November 13, 2005
1795: The Post Road Harford County's Post Road has been in existence since the 1660s. Mostly following present day Route 7, the Post Road was a vital thoroughfare connecting the entire Eastern Seaboard. Though well used by all - from dignitaries such as George Washington to merchants and artists such as Charles Willson Peale - the Post Road was notorious for its deplorable conditions. By 1795, the road had not much improved when Irish-born Isaac Weld began his exploration of America. On Nov. 16, Weld, who wrote about and sketched scenes from his travels, left Philadelphia for Baltimore via stagecoach.
NEWS
February 13, 2005
Bunyan Tyrone "Ty" Thomas, a retired welding supervisor who also owned a Baltimore business that sold and repaired television sets, died of a heart attack Feb. 6 at Sinai Hospital. The West Baltimore resident was 82. Born and raised in Dothan, Ala., Mr. Thomas joined the Army's 92nd Infantry Division in 1941. He was honorably discharged in 1944 and moved to Baltimore to attend college. Mr. Thomas studied chemistry at Morgan State College and the Johns Hopkins University before going to work full time for the Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., where he was a welding supervisor.
NEWS
April 27, 2004
Robert Emerson DuVall, founder and president of Mobile Welding Service who also was a champion trapshooter and former motorcyclist, died of cancer Friday at Carroll Lutheran Village. He was 81. Mr. DuVall, who was born, raised and lived his entire life in Westminster, was a 1939 graduate of Westminster High School. During World War II, he served as a Marine marksman in the Pacific. After the war, he returned to Westminster, where he established Mobile Welding Service in 1948. The company, which is known for its fleet of yellow trucks, specialized in repairing heavy equipment and structural-steel construction.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2003
The long and bitter battle over the direction of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield ended last night when the Maryland General Assembly unanimously approved legislation that locks the insurer's nonprofit mission into law. The Senate vote was 46-0. The House of Delegates vote was 139-0. The legislation also gives state regulators the power to review pay and severance packages for executives and would force the replacement of CareFirst's Maryland board members. Both chambers of the General Assembly had been working on reform legislation since last month, when Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen rejected CareFirst's application to convert to for-profit operation and sell itself to California-based WellPoint Health Networks Inc. for $1.37 billion.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Escalating the conflict over the nomination of William Weld to be ambassador to Mexico, Richard G. Lugar threatened yesterday to use his own committee chairmanship to retaliate against his fellow Republican senator, Jesse Helms, for bottling up Weld's confirmation.Lugar, of Indiana, said that the Agriculture Committee, which he chairs, will hold hearings in September on the recent tobacco settlement, an issue of enormous concern to Helms and to the 100,000 tobacco farmers in his home state of North Carolina.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 6, 1996
BOSTON -- After a fierce campaign that was dubbed the "battle of the blue bloods," Democratic Sen. John F. Kerry won a third Senate term with surprising ease last night, defeating the state's popular Gov. William F. Weld, a moderate Republican.Polls had called the race a dead heat right down to election eve. But Kerry won by a wider margin than expected, 53 percent to 44 percent."I'm not stupid. I got the message," Weld said in an exuberant, gracious concession speech. "The message is: I'm a real good governor and I should stick to that."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Nicol and By Charles Nicol,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2001
Stillwater, by William F. Weld. Simon and Schuster. 235 pages. $23. First we note that William Weld served as governor of Massachusetts before turning to writing fiction. This makes him an interesting curiosity, and anyway, he asked for it when his first novel, Mackerel by Moonlight, was about -- what else? --a clever political operative, Terry Mullally, who got himself elected senator from Massachusetts while covering up a few major blemishes on his past and falling in love as well. In a less popular sequel, he struggled with his first few months in Washington.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1999
The small red-and-white candy-striped cottage on U.S. 40 in Ellicott City where Shirley Sause Massey and Pretty Boy, her spotted pony, once lived isn't long for this world, she expects.One of the last remnants of Maryland's mom and pop roadside commercial era on that stretch of highway, her old family homestead is up for lease and will likely be redeveloped -- leveled and replaced -- to fit the retail landscape near Rogers Avenue, she said."The buildings are 50 years old. They were never built with the idea of standing for posterity.
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