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NEWS
February 27, 1999
WHAT IF physicians had ignored death rates that suggested bloodletting wasn't such a great cure? What if mapmakers kissed off sailors' stories that disproved the Earth is flat? What if astronomers had evidence that Pluto isn't really a planet but decided to keep calling it one anyway? Hold it, that's where we are.The International Astronomical Union says it will continue to list Pluto as our solar system's ninth planet even if it doesn't measure up. The IAU has gone medieval by placing tradition over science.
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SPORTS
February 18, 2008
This week, the NFL stages its annual scouting combine, the meat market where potential draft picks will be measured within an inch of their lives. Drafting might not be an exact science, but the NFL does its best to make it so. What goes on in Indianapolis will certainly have an impact on how teams make their selections in April. Maybe it will have too much of an impact. Add this to the list of things Mr. Flip just doesn't understand. After all the scouting that goes on when the college players are playing actual games, why should the stopwatch-fest this week carry much weight?
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Writer | January 19, 1994
Geraldo Rivera is coming to prime time, and he's got his sights set on Larry King's viewers.Cable channel CNBC yesterday announced it will launch a new weeknight talk show Feb. 7 called "Rivera Live." The program, which will go head-to- head with King six nights a week at 9, will feature Rivera reporting, interviewing and taking phone calls from around the country."If I had to describe it, probably the most simple way would be to say it's 'Larry King' meets 'Crossfire,' with a little 'Nightline' thrown in," Rivera told TV critics in Los Angeles.
NEWS
October 30, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Special wisdom needed Does the man who came up with the seven habits of highly effective people have any wisdom for one governor, 47 senators and 141 delegates as they head into one special session? Maryland baltimoresun.com/marbella The northern dynasty All of a sudden, the Boston Red Sox are taking on the role of their archrivals, the New York Yankees. Sports baltimoresun.com/schmuck OTHER VOICES Dan Thanh Dang on warranties -- Business Susan Reimer on slot dangers -- Today David Steele on the NBA -- Sports 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Weird science -- John Lepiarz and Trent Arterberry present an amusing take on science in the show "Super Scientific Circus."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 5, 1994
Except for the premiere of a new CBS drama series that reunites two producers and two stars of "St. Elsewhere," all the action tonight is on cable. Heading the list: a wild and delightfully mature cartoon series called "Duckman," and the TV premiere of a wild and delightfully immature movie called "Groundhog Day."* "Never Say Never Again." (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Actually, in this case, it wouldn't have been such a bad idea. Most of the plots and stunts seem purloined from previous Bond stories and movies, and Klaus Maria Brandauer, as the villain, lights up the screen a lot more than Sean Connery's female costar, Kim Basinger.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
Ah, just what we need for a relaxing weekend evening: contentious political debates! The lineup offers a couple of prime examples, both local and national. But movies and a Burt Reynolds guest spot may provide relief.* "Square Off" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Although re-scheduled to air only four times a year, the venerable argument show now offers a whole hour of conflict, with host Richard Sher moderating veteran panelists, including: Elane Stein, Tom Marr, Carl Snowden, Boyse Mosley, Arnold Weiner, St. George Crosse, Toni Keane, Ava Lias-Booker, Carter Clews and Bob Scherr.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1996
Missed "Pride and Prejudice" the first time around? Tonight, A&E offers you that rarest of rarities, a second chance. Don't mess up this time.* "World Professional Figure Skating Championships" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- This second night of taped highlights from last month's competition at Largo's USAir Arena features the longer artistic performances. Skaters include Nancy Kerrigan, Paul Wylie and the ice-dancing team of Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean. NBC.* "Malcolm X" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54)
NEWS
October 30, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Special wisdom needed Does the man who came up with the seven habits of highly effective people have any wisdom for one governor, 47 senators and 141 delegates as they head into one special session? Maryland baltimoresun.com/marbella The northern dynasty All of a sudden, the Boston Red Sox are taking on the role of their archrivals, the New York Yankees. Sports baltimoresun.com/schmuck OTHER VOICES Dan Thanh Dang on warranties -- Business Susan Reimer on slot dangers -- Today David Steele on the NBA -- Sports 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Weird science -- John Lepiarz and Trent Arterberry present an amusing take on science in the show "Super Scientific Circus."
SPORTS
February 18, 2008
This week, the NFL stages its annual scouting combine, the meat market where potential draft picks will be measured within an inch of their lives. Drafting might not be an exact science, but the NFL does its best to make it so. What goes on in Indianapolis will certainly have an impact on how teams make their selections in April. Maybe it will have too much of an impact. Add this to the list of things Mr. Flip just doesn't understand. After all the scouting that goes on when the college players are playing actual games, why should the stopwatch-fest this week carry much weight?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 24, 1994
Godel's Theorem of 1931 postulates that some principles of mathematics cannot be proven mathematically, but only by external methods of logic. The epistemological significance of this theorem appears to be that some things must be taken on faith.Oh, yeah? Hey, Kurt, I doubt if you'd be so big on faith if you'd seen what's been done to you and your cohorts in physics and higher math in the new low-Q "I.Q.," which opens tomorrow.In fact, the movie seems to offer a new theory of relativity: E (instein)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carole Goldberg and Carole Goldberg,HARTFORD COURANT | August 21, 2005
Has the Flying Spaghetti Monster touched you with His Noodly Appendage? Bobby Henderson hopes so. Henderson was honked off, to put it mildly, by those urging the teaching of Intelligent Design in high-school science courses (as is being considered in Kansas), a position recently supported by President Bush. After a 4 a.m. stroke of inspiration, the 25-year-old, who has a degree in physics from Oregon State University, conceived the Flying Spaghetti Monster as the fount of a new religion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Cool. That's what four kids at Federal Hill Preparatory School said when they learned they could leave school for a few hours last week for a sneak preview of the newly expanded Maryland Science Center. It would not be their last "cool" of the day. Fourth-graders Sydney Spann and Matt Ekey, both 9, and third-graders David Clark, 9, and Dominique Willis, 8, are what you might call budding science geeks. What better focus group, we thought, for a shakedown tour of the newly renovated (but still unfinished)
FEATURES
By Steve Rhodes and Steve Rhodes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 1998
Chicago -- Richard Seed is a busy man these days. Busy hatching plans. Out on the lecture circuit. Developing grand theories. Thinking.Or so he would have you believe.More likely, he is spending a lot of time at his home in Riverside, west of Chicago. He apparently has no job, and he isn't making any money from his much-discussed cloning lab. There is no cloning lab. Just the occasional call from a reporter wanting to know how it's going.But Seed will not be cloning anyone. The wild ride he's been on since December is over.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1996
Missed "Pride and Prejudice" the first time around? Tonight, A&E offers you that rarest of rarities, a second chance. Don't mess up this time.* "World Professional Figure Skating Championships" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- This second night of taped highlights from last month's competition at Largo's USAir Arena features the longer artistic performances. Skaters include Nancy Kerrigan, Paul Wylie and the ice-dancing team of Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean. NBC.* "Malcolm X" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
Ah, just what we need for a relaxing weekend evening: contentious political debates! The lineup offers a couple of prime examples, both local and national. But movies and a Burt Reynolds guest spot may provide relief.* "Square Off" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Although re-scheduled to air only four times a year, the venerable argument show now offers a whole hour of conflict, with host Richard Sher moderating veteran panelists, including: Elane Stein, Tom Marr, Carl Snowden, Boyse Mosley, Arnold Weiner, St. George Crosse, Toni Keane, Ava Lias-Booker, Carter Clews and Bob Scherr.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 24, 1994
Godel's Theorem of 1931 postulates that some principles of mathematics cannot be proven mathematically, but only by external methods of logic. The epistemological significance of this theorem appears to be that some things must be taken on faith.Oh, yeah? Hey, Kurt, I doubt if you'd be so big on faith if you'd seen what's been done to you and your cohorts in physics and higher math in the new low-Q "I.Q.," which opens tomorrow.In fact, the movie seems to offer a new theory of relativity: E (instein)
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | May 28, 1991
For years, Baltimore County high school students have been allowed to skip social studies, English and foreign language classes in the name of science.Six-period science courses, which enabled students to participate in a double period lab each week, were often held at the expense of a non-science class -- a class that students were permitted to cut, providing they made up any missed work.But years of difficulty with scheduling conflicts are causing a change in that policy, which doesn't sit well with some people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carole Goldberg and Carole Goldberg,HARTFORD COURANT | August 21, 2005
Has the Flying Spaghetti Monster touched you with His Noodly Appendage? Bobby Henderson hopes so. Henderson was honked off, to put it mildly, by those urging the teaching of Intelligent Design in high-school science courses (as is being considered in Kansas), a position recently supported by President Bush. After a 4 a.m. stroke of inspiration, the 25-year-old, who has a degree in physics from Oregon State University, conceived the Flying Spaghetti Monster as the fount of a new religion.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 5, 1994
Except for the premiere of a new CBS drama series that reunites two producers and two stars of "St. Elsewhere," all the action tonight is on cable. Heading the list: a wild and delightfully mature cartoon series called "Duckman," and the TV premiere of a wild and delightfully immature movie called "Groundhog Day."* "Never Say Never Again." (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Actually, in this case, it wouldn't have been such a bad idea. Most of the plots and stunts seem purloined from previous Bond stories and movies, and Klaus Maria Brandauer, as the villain, lights up the screen a lot more than Sean Connery's female costar, Kim Basinger.
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