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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 30, 2006
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, 65, is ready to serve Bill and Hillary Clinton the next time they want a meal at the Aspen, Colo., diner he owns. The former Merry-Go-Round retail empire honcho -- who was a character in the 1982 Barry Levinson film Diner -- presides over a stylish food and retail business known as Boogie's Diner. It's a must stop for Aspen's numerous celebrity visitors -- and the Clintons have been there several times. His staff serves about 1,000 patrons daily at the 1950s-style restaurant renowned for hot turkey sandwiches and milkshakes at his up-market shoe and denim departments.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 28, 2007
Albert Kilberg, a retired clothing manufacturing executive, died of a heart attack Monday at his home in Harper House in Cross Keys. He was 92. Mr. Kilberg, the son of Russian immigrant parents, was born in Baltimore and raised on Ann Street. One of seven siblings, he helped support his family by delivering Yiddish newspapers. He was a 1933 graduate of City College. During World War II, he served as a captain in the Army Supply Corps in the European theater of operations. Mr. Kilberg played a pivotal role in procuring and delivering supplies needed for the historic Yalta Conference that was held early in 1945.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1994
Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc. denied a report yesterday that said Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, the company's chairman, chief executive and co-founder, intends to leave day-to-day operations in December and move back to his home in Aspen, Colo.No decisions will be made on when Mr. Weinglass steps back from day-to-day management until Joppa-based Merry-Go-Round's operations are on a more even keel, Mr. Weinglass and company officials said.He may leave after the end of the year if results improve, but he doesn't have a firm schedule, Mr. Weinglass said in an interview.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 30, 2006
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, 65, is ready to serve Bill and Hillary Clinton the next time they want a meal at the Aspen, Colo., diner he owns. The former Merry-Go-Round retail empire honcho -- who was a character in the 1982 Barry Levinson film Diner -- presides over a stylish food and retail business known as Boogie's Diner. It's a must stop for Aspen's numerous celebrity visitors -- and the Clintons have been there several times. His staff serves about 1,000 patrons daily at the 1950s-style restaurant renowned for hot turkey sandwiches and milkshakes at his up-market shoe and denim departments.
NEWS
September 27, 1991
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, the chairman of Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc. who has been in the news for his attempts to buy the Orioles and obtain a new football franchise for Baltimore, has made a $25,000 contribution to the United Way of Central Maryland's 1991 campaign.Yesterday, United Way spokesman Mel Tansill announced the gift, which was made in the names of Weinglass and his wife, Pepper.The money will be used to help support more than 300 health and human services in Baltimore and the five surrounding counties, Tansill said.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | September 23, 1993
CHICAGO -- The Rhinos could be back.Representatives of the two prospective owners of a Baltimore NFL team met yesterday with the league's merchandisers, but did not deliver a name for the franchise should it be awarded to the city.The league has asked the potential owners, Florida-based investor Malcolm Glazer and a group led by retail executive Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, to try to agree on a name so merchandise can be prepared for sale immediately after the teams are announced Oct. 26.They initially agreed on Rhinos, but a public outburst led them to reconsider.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass has added two prominent local businessmen to his investment group seeking an NFL team for Baltimore.John Paterakis, owner of H&S Bakery in Baltimore, and Henry Rosenberg, head of Baltimore-based Crown Central Petroleum, have both joined in recent days, Weinglass said. A third, Louis J. Grasmick, head of Louis J. Grasmick Lumber Co. of Baltimore, might also join, he said.All three men have been mentioned as potential NFL investors in the past, and Grasmick, husband of state superintendent of schools Nancy S. Grasmick, was an investor in the aborted NFL bid of Maryland-based author Tom Clancy.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
Wearied by an intense bankruptcy process and largely unsuccessful in his attempts to fix the national retailer he founded, Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass will leave day-to-day management at Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc. this month, officials said yesterday.Mr. Weinglass, who parachuted back into daily operations a year ago after sales began plummeting at the fashion retailer, is expected to resign as chief executive officer by mid-November and rejoin his family at his home in Aspen, Colo., said Merry-Go-Round spokesman Michael W. Kempner.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass had dazzled the national media with one-liners during an afternoon news conference yesterday.But moments after the NFL had postponed a decision on Baltimore's expansion fate for another month, his one-liners weren't the funny kind."
SPORTS
June 21, 1991
Baltimore-born Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, founder an chairman of Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc., is trying to buy the Orioles. The 49-year-old wears jeans, his hair in a ponytail, is close friends with movie director Barry Levinson and is described as ferociously competitive.His friends and acquaintances think he would make a great owner because of his knowledge of baseball, his loyalty toBaltimore, ability to build winning business teams and willingness to spend money on the team.We'd like to know if you would like to see Weinglass buy the team.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2005
Baltimorean Howard "Chip" Silverman considers himself the "keeper of a legacy" - a tangible one located in Village of Cross Keys in North Baltimore. It is here, in his 1,300-square-foot residence in the high-rise Harper House condominiums, that he keeps an urban memory alive for himself and a very special group of friends. "You are about to enter the `Disco Condo,'" he remarked, turning the key deliberately in the lock. After the neutral decor of the unusually quiet 12th-floor hallway, the sights and sounds beyond the front door are a show-stopper.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | November 28, 2003
OVER LUNCH the other day, boxing legend Mack Lewis listened as the talk got around to elephants at the Baltimore Zoo. The city has no money to keep them. The state's broke, too. So hands now reach deep into private pockets to keep the big beasts here instead of somewhere else. "How come?' said Vince Johns, digging into a plate of gnocchi that could stagger a charging rhino, if not an elephant. "Yeah, how come?" said Alan Goldstein, the former Sun sportswriter, digging into a plate of spaghetti at Sabatino's Restaurant in Little Italy.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | January 9, 1997
Up and down the Rocky Mountains they go, riding the bus to the various outposts of the Western Slope League. Four of the trips take 3 1/2 hours; another takes six. For Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, assistant coach for the Aspen (Colo.) High School boys varsity basketball team, there's plenty of time to think.A little more than three years ago, he was a prospective owner for a Baltimore NFL expansion franchise, traveling to meetings, mingling with owners, the "Diner" guy selling himself and his city, trying to bring pro football back to his hometown.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
If the bidding goes his way at Merry-Go-Round's auction Saturday, Jim Hibler of Dundalk plans to take home a 1950s red Mobilgas pump for his living room.Richard Albersheim of Pikesville has his sights on a Stairmaster, and maybe even the framed "Blue Meanie" celluloid art from the Beatles' "Yellow Submarine" movie.And both men have looked longingly at the 1972 blue-and-white Harley-Davidson motorcycle that's included in the liquidation of thousands of the company's assets at its Harford County headquarters.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | June 25, 1995
Diner guys, made famous in Barry Levinson's "Diner," came from all over the country to attend summer camp last weekend at the Woods resort in Hedgesville, W. Va. The annual sports-camp idea was the brainchild of diner guy Danny Snyder, president of Corporate Sports Battle, which airs on ESPN. The first event was held five years ago in Oxford, Pa. It moved to Western Maryland College for a few years. Then the 50-something campers got smart and decided that comfort was becoming more of a necessity after strenuous physical activity, so the location was upgraded.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | February 9, 1995
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass wants to buy the three-store Boogie's Diner division from Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc., the national apparel retailer that he founded and presided over until three weeks ago, sources said yesterday.One of the more offbeat concepts ever served up by a retailer, Boogie's Diner sells burgers, fries, fur coats and snakeskin boots under the same roof."Eat heavy. Dress cool," is its motto, and the mustachioed, street-talking Mr. Weinglass is its apotheosis.So it makes sense for Boogie and Boogie's Diner to reunite, fashion experts said.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | July 31, 1993
A prospective Baltimore NFL football team owner is considering putting a dome on the city's proposed downtown stadium so that it could accommodate concerts, conventions and other money-making events.The Maryland Stadium Authority has never rejected the possibility of adding a dome, but has legislative approval for funding only an open-air facility. Adding a dome would cost an additional $100 million to the projected $150 million stadium price, and the money would have to be raised privately.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | June 18, 1991
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, a former Baltimorean, businessman and a model for a character in the movie "Diner," is exploring the possibility of buying the Orioles.NB Weinglass revealed his interest last night sports talk show onWCAO-AM radio hosted by Stan "The Fan" Charles."I think he would make a tremendous owner," Charles said this morning, though "it's at the very, very early stages."New York investor Eli S. Jacobs, who owns the controlling share of the Orioles, is considering selling the baseball team he bought in 1989.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | January 29, 1995
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, former boss of Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc., wore a pony tail, lived in blue jeans, skipped college and dated high school girls in his mid-30s.Thomas Shull, new boss of Joppa-based Merry-Go-Round, worked in the White House, went to Harvard Business School, used to jog with Oliver North and wears horn-rims and tassel loafers.The vibe has changed at Merry-Go-Round. Or, as Mr. Shull might say, the parameters have been adjusted.The company that sells bare-tummy T-shirts and leather miniskirts to teens is now in the hands of two of the most button-down, stand-up, blue-chip types outside the U.S. Army.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | January 19, 1995
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, the Baltimore street kid who built a billion-dollar fashion empire through the fickle tastes of U.S. teen-agers, retired yesterday from his now-faltering company, Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc.The pony-tailed local hero and one-time bidder for Baltimore sports franchises resigned as Merry-Go-Round chairman and director, saying he wanted to spend more time with his family. His ties to the Joppa-based retailer that he co-founded 26 years ago are now limited to a 9.5 percent block of stock, worth about $8 million at yesterday's prices.
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